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  1. #1
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    Anyone using this tool or similiar

    http://pricepoint.com/detail/15157-3...ube-Cutter.htm


    I'm looking at picking on up to make my cuts a little straighter.
    "And I shout that your all fakes and you should have seen the look on your face"

  2. #2
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    For steerer tubes you want one of the Park Tool saw guides. That other tool is basically a plumbers pipe cutter. You can find them at hardware stores for about $6. Fine for trimming handlebars or seat posts, but too flimsy IMO for steerers.
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  3. #3
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    Tube Cutter

    That looks like a tubing cutter you can get at your local home store for around the same price. I have used one to cut steerer tubes and it works pretty well although the tube gets slightly compressed at the cut area which makes insertion of the star nut a little difficult.

  4. #4
    Lay off the Levers
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    I've used a tube cutter on several steerers. You have to have a good one that doesn't wander and spiral, and you have to take your time or you will mushroom the outside edge of the cut area. You still have to file the outer edge down to get something like a CK headset cap over the end.

    It's probably the easiest physical way to cut a tube it but requires some finishing.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  5. #5
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    FWIW, if I don't feel like running down to the shop, I just wrap a piece of blue masking tape around any tube I want to cut, then follow the edge around lightly with the hacksaw, then make the cut. The light scoring seems to guide the blade during the actual cut. Not usually quite as perfect as using the shop guide, but really close.
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  6. #6
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    Thanks, I went with the Park Tool

    Quote Originally Posted by cutthroat
    For steerer tubes you want one of the Park Tool saw guides. That other tool is basically a plumbers pipe cutter. You can find them at hardware stores for about $6. Fine for trimming handlebars or seat posts, but too flimsy IMO for steerers.

    I remebered I tried the Pie Cutter with my Reba and it wasn't pretty. Getting Ready for my new 66 SL ATA
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  7. #7
    MK_
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpenglow
    http://pricepoint.com/detail/15157-3...ube-Cutter.htm


    I'm looking at picking on up to make my cuts a little straighter.
    That tool there is a standard pipe cutter. The price seems decent. Go to your local hardware store and look at pipe cutters. Get one that can cut at least 1 1/8th tube. I've been using one for a long time. I've cut aluminum and steel. The cut is very smooth, much smoother than a typical saw cut. The only downside is that it will actually thicken the outer diameter of the steerer tube near the cut and will require you to file a little bit.

    _MK
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  8. #8
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    I use the pipe cutter all the time. Actually with practice you can make an extremely clean cut. Just use a plumbers pipe file/deburring tool/reamer for a couple of bucks and use it to file off the steerer tube afterwards. I did the hacksaw thing and couldn't cut a strait line even though I had a mitre box, plus it's a lot more elbow grease.

  9. #9
    t66
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    If you do it carefully, that tool makes a straighter cut than the Park guide. Got mine at Lowes. I cleaned it up with a Dremell, a file would work too. I've used it on aluminum, haven't tried on steal.

  10. #10
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    i've actually used a dremel and it's worked fine.

  11. #11
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    man, i cant believe no ones mentioned that its a pipe cutter and it will work fine but youll need to do some finish work with a cpl files. i reccomend a flat on the od and a rat tail on the id. also you can grab on for less than $10 at the local nascar sponsorship depot. common! get with it guys! ya bunch of slackers!
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  12. #12
    trail fairy
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    I just use a hacksaw and a good eye oh the file is mandatory

    I like to have a tiny spacer on top of my stem for the top cap to rest on it gives allows for a good hold for the stem 2 to the fork
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  13. #13
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    What's a good length to leave the steerer tube above the headset? Should the top of the tube be even with the top of the seat or do you guys leave some extra?

  14. #14
    MK_
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    Quote Originally Posted by burker
    What's a good length to leave the steerer tube above the headset? Should the top of the tube be even with the top of the seat or do you guys leave some extra?
    The minimum is the length of your head tube + the stack height of your stem + stack height of your headset. Leave also as much length as is necessary for all the spacers you want to put under the stem.

    If you're not sure about your handlebar position, leave an inch or more extra to have room to play around,

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  15. #15
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    The top of the steerer tube needs to sit at least 3mm below the top of the stem, or the top of your spacer above the stem, to allow room for the headset topcap to drop in and seat properly. If the topcap touches the top of the steerer tube you won't be able to load the headset bearings.
    When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. ~H.G. Wells

  16. #16
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    I have cut several steerer tubes with the pipe cutter and it works fine. Just make sure you start off with light pressure to get a good score all the way around the steerer. Once it's scored, keep tightening in small increments and running the tool around until it cuts completely through.

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