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  1. #1
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    Anyone running a Rohloff hub on their Turner?

    Various threads suggest quite a few people have intermittent drivetrain problems. Me too - it's called mud. It's quite popular in the UK, especially the really sticky stuff that doesn't just fly off but builds up nicely, ruining shifting & generally promoting the perversion of singlespeeding (half the time I run a 27 gear drivetrain as a SS because it won't change gear). So a Rohloff hub looks like a good thing, if a tad expensive.

    i've seen a few pictures of full sussers with a Rohloff, but has anyone done it successfully with a Turner? Any pictures? Any do's & don't's?

    Ta muchly.

  2. #2
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    There is also a lightweight Speedhub is the works. Don't know much about it and Rohloff won't return emails asking about it.

  3. #3
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    Seems to me that Mtn Bike Fiction reviewed a bike with a Rohloff a year ago or so. They liked it, but maybe felt the drag in a few of the gears. Probably less drag than the mud you're describing.

    They are very tempting. Anything that can get rid of two derailers, one shifter, a chain tensioner, bash guard (for us light duty riders), etc. is tempting to me! The problem is cost and weight, not to mention the hassle of switching in the spare rear wheel along with derailers, etc. if a problem arises with the Rohloff.

    Today's conspiracy theory: Having seen the intricate beauty of Shimano fishing reels, I'm certain that they could make a near perfect Rohloff-style hub at a much lower weight, but why would they want to? So that they could sell fewer of the high priced components we go through like the blazes now? That would kind of be like Gillette developing a $20 razor blade that lasted 10 years.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  4. #4
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    With the Rohloff, as far as the chain cares, you're riding a single speed. Good for mud, bad for Turners. It needs an unchanging BB to axle length (aka hardtail or BB-concentric main pivot), or a chain tensioner.

  5. #5
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    How do Nicolais with the Rohloff options get around it?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suicider
    or a chain tensioner.
    exactamundo. there's pics on the rohloff site of this. did mucho research back when I had the scratch to get one, but didn't.
    Taking it easy for all you sinners.

  7. #7
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    Nope, Suicider, there are a few full sussers around running Rohloffs (I've seen pictures of an Intense 5.5 & a Giant Reign). Rohloff do a chain tensioner that looks like a very robust & small rear mech.

    Seems to me it needs the Rohloff with the speedbone bit instead of the torque arm & cables zip tied to the hydraulic line. There's a great guide to what you need here and here (oo er, I hope those linky things worked).

  8. #8
    on a routine expedition
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    How do Nicolais with the Rohloff options get around it?
    The swingarm pivots around the front chainring, so the distance from the front chainring to rear sprocket doesn't change.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
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    Not a Turner, but here's a Ventana X5 with a Rolhoff:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?p=254374#post254374

  10. #10
    northern soul
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    In the Flux-Setup-Database is one bike with a Rohloff pictured...
    good night, good ride ...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkullCrack
    The swingarm pivots around the front chainring, so the distance from the front chainring to rear sprocket doesn't change.
    No, all models are Rohloffable from the factory, including the FSR linked models.

  12. #12
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    So is it fair to say that DT has "Okayed" the use of the rear disc mount for fixing the torque arm used by the Speedhub?

    I ask because the Rohloff site makes it clear that the stresses from the torque arm may not be within the design spec of the average disc tab. Of course, the tab on my Spot looks plenty beefy to me, but what the hell do I know?

    I too am becoming increasingly tempted by the benefits of the Speedhub.

  13. #13
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    Flux with Rohloff, but no pic or weight:

    Flux Setups (Data Base)

  14. #14
    No, that's not phonetic
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    I just bought a used Rohloff off a friend for $300, barely used (the hub, not the friend), but I have yet to build it into a wheel. I actually got it to mate with a Large Marge rim for the FrankenSnowTurner that I want to put together for Barny. Can you imagine how much that wheel is going to weigh?????
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farticus
    Nope, Suicider, there are a few full sussers around running Rohloffs (I've seen pictures of an Intense 5.5 & a Giant Reign). Rohloff do a chain tensioner that looks like a very robust & small rear mech.
    Hence my mention of the chain tensioner.

  16. #16
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    Yeah ,my rohloff wheel came out over 5 lbs

    My advice is not to try and save weight on the tire either, I was running a thin walled 2.5 nevegal and got an amazing amount of pinch flats no matter what pressure I was running ,even running heavy DH innertubes did not help. Moving to a tire with beefier sidewalls seems to have solved the problem.

    All in all after a year of running a rohloff on my rfx (see thread here) I'd have to say the speedhub is a very nice system but it also has its downsides. The heavy rear wheel has a some effect on the handling of the bike and it does ruin with the tracking of the rear suspension somewhat, especially at high speeds.

  17. #17
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    it's not for everyone, but in the right conditions they're great...

    I've got a couple of 29'ers equipped with Rohloffs (been using them for over six years on a variety of bikes) and have recently been experimenting with running a 26' rim with an agressive 3" downhill tyre for winter/mud riding and it's working out really well.

    I've been running the tyre about 10lb and the traction is formidible. The big tyre, rohloff et al amounts to a lot of weight but it's still rideable up hill, although you can feel the substantial weight, but you make up for that minus with astonishing traction which allows you to go way further than you should be allowed to. Also great mud clearance given the 26' wheel in a 29' hole.

    I'd recommend running a torque arm, I've broken three frames over the years with the Speedbone, so I would get an ironclad assurance from the framebuilder before putting one of those on again. I know of others that have broken the chainstays with their Rohloffs/speedbones as well, so be warned!

    I personally think the torque arm looks cool, kinda retro and it's a breeze to use, and probably no extra weight over the Speedbone anyway, so I'm back with it for good.

    You can feel the difference between a Rohloff equipped/non Rohloff bike on the move, and especially on long slow ascents. I definetely wouldn't be using one unless I lived where there is likely to be a lot mud or snow. It's extra weight and drag in the dry and dust, but worth it's weight in gold in adverse conditions such as mud, glug, bog and snow.

    My 2.(NZ)cents worth...hope it helps...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bryceb
    I've got a couple of 29'ers equipped with Rohloffs (been using them for over six years on a variety of bikes) and have recently been experimenting with running a 26' rim with an agressive 3" downhill tyre for winter/mud riding and it's working out really well.

    Also great mud clearance given the 26' wheel in a 29' hole.
    I'd like to see a photo of that.
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    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  19. #19
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    Wink no drivetrain troubles anymore!

    hi

    I'm running a Rohloff hub in a 2002 XCE for 3 years now after destroying rear derailleur after derailleur (XTs) and gnawling my frame with chain sucks... (in Switzerland we have plenty of wet/muddy conditions and lots of branches just waiting to tear off your expensive RD). One month ago I built up my new RFX with the bomb proof Rohloff wheel, and it works just fine.

    benefits (IMHO):
    + NO maintenance, except for an oil change once a year (easy)
    + chain lasts much longer thanks to the perfect alignment
    + ability to shift many gears in one twist and to shift gears in steep technical sections (of even while waiting at traffic lights)
    + just ride (forget chainsuck; chain slamming your frame; mud-stuck or frozen gears -> fully winter approved)
    + very fast gear shifts

    drawbacks:
    - appr. 1 pound heavier than the classical XT drivetrain
    - unsprung weight may cause a (very) small impact on suspension performance or an additional snake bite now and then (I run 26-27 psi for my featherweight 198lbs with gear on)
    - efficiency barely noticeable lower compared to an XT drivetrain under perfect conditions: new cogs, new chain, no dirt (shouldn't you consider road cycling...?)
    - no gear shifting under full load (I quickly got used to relieve the chain for the blink of an eye)
    - expensive (still: the many RDs and chains I replaced...)

    well, maybe it's just all about my biking attitude: I like to ride, not to screw (fix)

    I did not have any problems at all using the Speedbone or the disc brake mount only. Seems like the Turner frame is beefy enough to take the torque (anyone doubted?). It's worth spending some time on good cable routing though. You need the Rohloff chain tensioner on a Turner (I prefer the shorter DH type).

    It may not be the prefered solution for weight weenies (http://weightweenies.starbike.com/) or XC racers but for all the rest of us its just great to concentrate on riding, not on fixing problems.

    [ end of commercial ]

    regards
    manu

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