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  1. #1
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    After Burner DH Frame?

    I have been searching for a good used frame, to build a 6" travel all-mountain/freeride bike. I came across an inexpensive Turner After Burner DH frame that is in need of new bushing and a derailleur hanger. How does this frameset perform as an all-mountain frame? My riding experience is mostly on road and cross-country, so I am new to such extensive travel; I am building a 4" travel Santa Cruz Superlight. What is the frame weight? Will it be a decent all-mountain/freeride bike, in comparison to a Mountain Cycle San Andreas or Ellsworth Moment?

  2. #2
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
    Reputation: cactuscorn's Avatar
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    the afterburner was a excellent dh bike and would make a fine fr rig too but yer pretty much limited to a single ring setup. theres no cable stop for the f der. i think they were in the 9 or 10 lb range and didnt suffer from poor ride, flex and/or breakage issues of the other 2 bikes mentioned. a used 6 pack or rfx might be a better choice and worth the bigger investment. shaheeb has a rfx on the block as we speak.
    No, I'm NOT back!

  3. #3
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    If you can pick one up for cheap, it would be worth it, imo. If the deal is not that good, then I would drop a little more $ to pick up something a little newer and with possibly more life left in it.

    I'm currently riding one but it has an 02 rfx rear tri on it. I use it for AM/light FR stuff. I'm light (140lbs.) and I don't drop anything over 7' (with good transitions) so it has held up fine.

    You can run a front der. if you use a clamp on cable stop. I think Problem Solver makes one. I'm not sure of the weight of the frame. I did roughly weigh the whole bike once on a bathroom scale and it came out to around 34lbs. Incredibly accurate, I know! It's not super light, but it can still climb and the weight feels stable in the air.
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  4. #4
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    I had no idea that the After Burner was not setup for a front derailleur; I guess I don't think like a DH rider. That alone, is a turn-off as I intend to run a double chainring setup. This will be a 6" all-mountain bike, not a downhill bike. I ride mostly cross country however, my friends take me out on some more "hardcore" rides. This bike will be for use when my 4" superlight won't cut it. I suppose it is back to the drawing board. Maybe I will opt for the Ellsworth Moment or a Mountain Cycle San Andreas.

  5. #5
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    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...=203&category=


    You can use this and then ziptie the derailleur housing to your rear brake. it works without any problems
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  6. #6
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    Reputation: airwreck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beefmagic
    You can use this and then ziptie the derailleur housing to your rear brake. it works without any problems
    isn't there interference problems with the front deraileur and the old style/straight chainstays?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by airwreck
    isn't there interference problems with the front deraileur and the old style/straight chainstays?
    That I don't know for sure, but yes, it looks like it might be a problem. I forgot that the original Afterburner setups had straight chainstays on both sides. Thanks for pointing that out. It could be an expensive mistake if it didn't work. The OP may be able to trade in the old one or find a newer rear tri. Unless, the AfterBurner is reeaally cheap, it's probably not worth the trouble.

  8. #8
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    Are you looking at the Afterburner frame on the Bay at the moment? (Would grab it myself, but no postage outside US). Its an early one with the cable routing is on the downtube which presents a few other minor issues.

    An old RFX would be a better option in my opinion.

  9. #9
    aka baycat
    Reputation: Ryan G.'s Avatar
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    Just found one near me!

    asking 250

    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik/350762865.html

  10. #10
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    Team Bike

    I am pretty sure that is a team bike. The rockers do not look black, and the rear disc mount looks to be a handmade item. That was probably made in the spring of 1996. We quickly went to a Turner specific universal disc mount for all production bikes, at the time there was Hope, Magura, Hayes and Formula bolt patterns. So we made 4 different adapters that would fit our universal. The Magura with a slight change in offset became the 'standard' 51mm IS that is common today. For 250 that is a cheap way to get a thrasher, the 2006 RFX rear end would fit right on and offer front derailer clearance, but with cable routing going 2 ways it would be funky unless you were handy with the dremel and had it repainted.

    DT

  11. #11
    aka baycat
    Reputation: Ryan G.'s Avatar
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    And a '99 XCE, a bunch of old Turners popping up.

    *not me selling happy with my RFX*

    http://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/bik/350753836.html

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