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Thread: 6 pack Vs 6.6

  1. #1
    BSG
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    6 pack Vs 6.6

    Well Im getting ahead of myself but my five spot has been abused and next year Im looking to to get another frame. I love the idea of more travel and a slightly burlyer frame. Its still going to be a trail bike that needs to climb well( I live in colorado where the climbs are long and steep) I will be using all the parts from my 5 spot except fork(juicy 7, kings on 3.1, xt cranks) The 6.6 looks sweet but the 6 pack also looks great. I know the 6.6 is not out yet but with interbike come and gone I figure people could give there opinion. Im hoeing the bike weighs around 30-31 lbs. Id probable go for the dhx air rear and rc2 talas front. Any opinions would be great.
    BSG

  2. #2
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    Don't mention id's over here
    Most people will say Six Pack on here as it is tried and tested.
    Try before you buy.
    Then post a review.

  3. #3
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    PS.
    Built up a Large Last month with RC 2 and DHX air and those wheels, Shwalbe 2.35 Fat alberts, Mono M6 and that came to 32lbs

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    BSG, I just noticed that you live in Telluride; cool. My wife's parents live there, just uphill from the airport. Yes, you need a bike that climbs if you're going to ride locally; I've left many a lung cell on the Telluride trails.
    I don't know anything about the 6.6 and neither do most folk. I believe the frame is supposed to be a little lighter than the pack. I ride an RFX, predecessor of the pack.
    To get a pack to the 30/31 pound mark, you're going to need to spend money on light components. Scan the six pack set up database for references, look at the squeaky wheel's six pack set up. He's approaching that weight.
    Don't skimp on your fork; those steep secret trails might require some bolt -on bravery!

  5. #5
    No, that's not phonetic
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    As I ran around the IBike floor show pulling people's displays apart to weigh everything, I happened across the Intense booth. Hmmm... 6.6s with XTR.... let's weigh it, thinks I. 29# (sans pedals), not too shabby:





    As for the original poster's question, I'd say either one. Get the 6.6 if you want to run a 1.5 Sherman, stand up and have a sorry pedaling technique on climbs, and aren't afraid of bearings. Get the 6-Pack if you want something which has been on the market for a while and is proven totally solid, if you are afraid of bearings (like me), and want totally active and plush suspension all the time. I rode both and would have to say it comes down to fit and what details you are looking for in a frame.
    Last edited by tscheezy; 10-03-2005 at 05:25 PM.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

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    Wow, thats almost an endorsement, thanx tscheezy
    Although the 6.6 has a 1.5 head tube, none of the forks we have run has been with a 1.5 steerer. We use a reducer headset the FSA Orbit X 1.5R which is 1.5 outside to 1.125 inside. This setup allows a very "low stack height" which means a lower front end or low effective bar height.

    And yes I am trolling the T board cuz of all the "tnt" hubub I heard about at Ibike.

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    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Simple beauty.
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    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by n10'sGuy
    And yes I am trolling the T board cuz of all the "tnt" hubub I heard about at Ibike.
    Well while we're all being honest, I troll the Intense board cuz of all the travel issues I heard about.

  9. #9
    BSG
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    Thanks

    Thanks for all the info. Ill probably end up with the 6 pack because of the turner trade in program. Im not sure if my frame is worth 600 because it has some small dents near the bottom bracket. For those who know Telluride type ridding(steeper then your avarage rockymountain trail all above 9000 feet) is the 6 pack going to kill me on the uphill. I figure I can back off alittle bit and probable climb fine. I also spend a decent amount of time in Utah and sedona were I figure the six will be perfect.
    Thanks again
    BSG

  10. #10
    Roy
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    Quote Originally Posted by BSG
    For those who know Telluride type ridding(steeper then your avarage rockymountain trail all above 9000 feet) is the 6 pack going to kill me on the uphill. I figure I can back off alittle bit and probable climb fine.
    It'll be fine, just a bit more weight to get used to. The downhills will be incredible.

  11. #11
    Amphibious Technologies
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    Quote Originally Posted by n10'sGuy
    n10's Guy sez: This setup allows a very "low stack height" which means a lower front end or low effective bar height.
    Why would this be desirable on a long travel bike like one with 6.6" of travel? Wouldn't you want a relatively higher effective bar height (e.g. bar height approx level with seat height)?

    The way that 6.6 is set-up, looks like the bar is lower than the seat which makes it more of a cross country bike. Why would one want to have a 6.6" travel cross country bike? If you want that, why not get a 5.4 or Flux instead?
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BSG
    For those who know Telluride type ridding(steeper then your avarage rockymountain trail all above 9000 feet) is the 6 pack going to kill me on the uphill.
    nothing short of a 20 pound bike and the fitness of a twenty year old will make a difference on the telluride climbs! Go for the pack!

  13. #13
    Now with flavor!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by SCUBAPRO
    Why would this be desirable on a long travel bike like one with 6.6" of travel? Wouldn't you want a relatively higher effective bar height (e.g. bar height approx level with seat height)?

    The way that 6.6 is set-up, looks like the bar is lower than the seat which makes it more of a cross country bike. Why would one want to have a 6.6" travel cross country bike? If you want that, why not get a 5.4 or Flux instead?
    For riding straight over really steep sections, sure a higher bar height does some good. But even long travel bikes have to turn. Getting weight over the front wheel to dig into soft/loose turns is universal, regardless of travel. If anything, the shorter stems and/or rear weight bias of longer travel bikes would even more so justifiy a lower hand position. My 8/8 dh bike has the same handlebar rise as my xc bike. I've also got the front end as low as possible with the fork without the tire/lowers hitting the crown.
    STRAVA: Enabling dorks everywhere to get trails shut down........ all for the sake of a race on the internet.

  14. #14
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    The 6 pack won't kill you, but trail heads starting above 9000 feet might.

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    Quote Originally Posted by string
    The 6 pack won't kill you, but trail heads starting above 9000 feet might.
    LOL - I was just in Durango this last weekend (on my 37lb RFX - which rocked Moab, but didn't like Durango so much - 5 Spot for the next trip - with maybe a rental Nomad or RF6 for Moab)

    2 days of riding trails starting (yes, I shuttled to the top, I hope I don't get banned from Colorado for admiting it) at 10,500' or so - even with the ride up, the climbs on the trails left this sea-level dweller gasping for air...it was pretty sad to walk not-that-steep sections of the Colorado Trail because I couldn't catch my breath....but man was it beautiful there...






  16. #16
    Flyin Canine
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    Quote Originally Posted by BSG
    Thanks for all the info. Ill probably end up with the 6 pack because of the turner trade in program. Im not sure if my frame is worth 600 because it has some small dents near the bottom bracket. For those who know Telluride type ridding(steeper then your avarage rockymountain trail all above 9000 feet) is the 6 pack going to kill me on the uphill. I figure I can back off alittle bit and probable climb fine. I also spend a decent amount of time in Utah and sedona were I figure the six will be perfect.
    Thanks again
    BSG
    Yeah, I'd say if you go DHX-air and TALAS in the front you'll be suprised at the climbing after a short period of getting used to the weight. I ride a 37-40 pound RFX and I can do most of the same climbs that I can on my 28 pound HH100. I climb slower for sure but no dying involved. The Talas will be big on that type of terrain. I have ETA on the front of my RFX and a 125mm Talas on my hh100. If I had a 36 on my rfx I think I could make more techy climbs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rroeder
    Hey macrider, great shots, is that the CT off the top of Kennebec pass? That is some great singletrack back to Durango, definitely one of my favs in the area.
    You nailed it in one - I have to say, it was the most beautiful stretch of singletrack I have ever ridden (although a BC helidrop was pretty damn good too) - we just got lucky on the Aspens changing - the climb up after the bridge was hell on my unadapted lungs though...saw a Pine Marten too - never seen one before...

  18. #18
    rr
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    Quote Originally Posted by macrider

    2 days of riding trails starting (yes, I shuttled to the top, I hope I don't get banned from Colorado for admiting it) at 10,500' or so - even with the ride up, the climbs on the trails left this sea-level dweller gasping for air...it was pretty sad to walk not-that-steep sections of the Colorado Trail because I couldn't catch my breath....but man was it beautiful there...
    Hey macrider, great shots, is that the CT off the top of Kennebec pass? That is some great singletrack back to Durango, definitely one of my favs in the area.

  19. #19
    rr
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    Quote Originally Posted by macrider
    You nailed it in one - I have to say, it was the most beautiful stretch of singletrack I have ever ridden (although a BC helidrop was pretty damn good too) - we just got lucky on the Aspens changing - the climb up after the bridge was hell on my unadapted lungs though...saw a Pine Marten too - never seen one before...
    My guess is the first pic was taken right after the talas field before the switchbacks, next time take your xc bike and do the fireroad up, I think it's 5000ft in 10 miles or something like that, that climb after the bridge will make you cry for mama

  20. #20
    Knomer
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    These bikes are very similar in many ways.....price, travel, weight, geomtery, intended use, etc.

    It really comes down to what kind of suspension design you'd like to ride. The RFX will be a modified single pivot(aka faux bar), and the 6.6 will be a modified 4 bar(aka VPP). I'm sure they both ride nice.
    Global Director of Sales: Knolly Bikes

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