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  1. #1
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    Trek Fuel owners

    I have a Fuel 80 that cracked the rear triangle. (you know the place.... )

    In any case, I got the shop to ship me the triangle directly and just let me put it on myself. When I took the old one off, I couldnt believe the shape the bushings were in, they were horrible!! I dont understand how Trek can say not to put any tube of lube or grease or anything on the pivot bushings. Its just a real hard plastic rubbing against the metal frame.

    So, I put the new triangle on, which is quite different btw, and when I was reassembling I put a little bit of grease on the bushings. Let me tell you, its a HUGE difference! I had to put 15psi more in the shock because it was so plush and moving so easily, its literally a new bike.

    I just cant understand why Trek says not to lube up the pivot bushings and linkage bushings when its obvious that something is needed there. The ONLY thing I can figure is that they dont want dirt trapped in there, but if you take care of the bike and clean it up after you ride, it shouldnt be a problem. Not to mention a slight bit of grease helps repel the water and resists corrosion.

    Anyway, just thought I'd share.

  2. #2
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    I thought you were supposed to glue the bushings into the rear triangle with a special green loctite? I don't have my service instructions in front of me to reference, but thats what I remember, maybe someone else can chime in. IIRC the only movement should be between the metal sleeve in the center of the bushing and the bushing itself. The bushing is supposed to be impregnated with lube, that's why Trek says no grease. IMO having the bushing rub against the triangle eyelet can only cause wear!

  3. #3
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    I dont see how they're impregnanted w/ lube.. the bushings are hard as a rock plastic.

    Regardless, its obvious that the bushing rubs on the frame and it needs something there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thrak
    I dont see how they're impregnanted w/ lube.. the bushings are hard as a rock plastic.

    Regardless, its obvious that the bushing rubs on the frame and it needs something there.
    Milt K is right, you are wrong, unfortunately (you can contact your local Trek dealer to verify this info). The bushings are to be LocTited into place (green, don't have the # handy).... and NO lube is to ever be applied - the bushings are Teflon impregnated (Teflon acting as the "lube") . A bit of advice - don't work on your equipment unless you know what the heck you're doing.....

  5. #5
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    its a "self lubricating" plastic, think teflon.

  6. #6
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    I just have in front of me email print where it says that main pivot pushings are aluminium
    and to be glued in chaintays. Bushings in seatstays and saddle tube pivot are plastic and my information is that they are pregreased, if one puts grease in them, bushings will swell!

  7. #7
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    then explain how the bushings I took out are grinded down, grooved and notched...

    I'll take my chances. The bike rides 100x better than before.

    Fuelish, I guess you listen to everything every manufacturer says huh? Stock components are good enough, right? Might as well pay your LBS hundreds of dollars because they know best eh?

    I wonder how many people have actually taken them out and checked them... here's your rolling eyes back.


    peace out folks...

  8. #8
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    Um, not sure but I thought the bushings were supposed to wear over time since it is a contact / pivot point. They wear out so the aluminum / frame doesn't. Replacing your bushings or bearings is a part of routine maintanance. Something it seems some people forget or just do not know about. They are cheaper and easier than bearings when it comes to replacing.
    If you did not you should have gotten new ones when you had the shop ship your rear triangle.
    Trek certainly is not the only bike company to use bushings and bikes are not the only machines to use them either.

  9. #9
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    You are correct fudy, but the bushings are bonded to the aluminum with the Loctite so there is no movement, and no wear where the bushings contact the aluminum. The wear point is the inside diameter of the bushing where the bolt goes through. That's how I understand it anyway. I got my Fuel 12/03 and the only thing I have done to the pivots is to loctite the bolts and torque them often as called out in the owners manual. Never had it apart.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by thrak
    then explain how the bushings I took out are grinded down, grooved and notched...

    I'll take my chances. The bike rides 100x better than before.

    Fuelish, I guess you listen to everything every manufacturer says huh? Stock components are good enough, right? Might as well pay your LBS hundreds of dollars because they know best eh?

    I wonder how many people have actually taken them out and checked them... here's your rolling eyes back.


    peace out folks...
    It sounds more like you think you are an engineer for Trek.

  11. #11
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    Thrak- What year is your bike? I was going to mention if it was an mid 2004 or later the main pivot bushing on the non-drive side is eccentric so you can align the rear triangle to the front. They may have given you the adjustable bushing kit as it is an upgrade for the older models. Part# was 243109. You can tell because the washer that is visible between the rear triangle and the frame has two small flats so you can put a special thin wrench on it to turn it.

  12. #12
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    #1 Reason not to use grease- it WILL disbond the loctite 680.......... and you don't need it.
    Anyone who rides a bike is a friend of mine.
    My favorite bike is whatever I am riding.
    My favorite trail is where ever I am.
    Bikes and equipment are replaceable, friends and trails are not.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by thrak

    Fuelish, I guess you listen to everything every manufacturer says huh? Stock components are good enough, right? Might as well pay your LBS hundreds of dollars because they know best eh?

    I wonder how many people have actually taken them out and checked them... here's your rolling eyes back.


    peace out folks...
    Peace up yer arse, jitbag. Yeah, I DO listen to manufacturers' reccomendations for maintenance of the very things they've designed/spec'ed. You, obviously, in your infinite wisdom, must somehow know better than the folks who engineered the thing in the first place (and I still stand by my original statements, at least as it applies to bushings on my '01 Fuel 90). More power to you, brother....now roll them eyes right back up your arse with the rest of your head...jitbag.
    Seems everyone else who's responded to you is wrong, and you're right... LMAO. I have the service procedure for the rear bushings, as e-mailed to my by Trek customer service scanned out of their tech manual. Lubing is a no-no, loctite is go. Good luck with your new rear triangle - sounds like you'll need it soon enough. Remember, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing........ I'd offer to e-mail you my files, but .... you apparently know better than Trek anyway, so .... nm

  14. #14
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    Personal assaults aside, as has allready been said: Bushing lube on this bike will cause them to attract crap and wear quickly (~~~something like petro lube on rubber). Also, may contribute to breaking 680 retaining compound. Then, the bushings pivot on, and ovalize the bores...

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