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  1. #1
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    Thomson Elite Setback Seatpost

    I have a 2001 Trek 6700. How do I figure out which size and weight to choose? Thanks.

    http://www.lhthomson.com/elite_sizes.asp

  2. #2
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    pull your existing seatpost

    The diameter should be stamped right on there, typically below the minimum insertion line. I'm assuming that by weight, you actually mean length. Is your current post too short? Too long? MTB posts are typically 330 to 400 mm long, but again, I would measure your existing seatpost and go from there. If you find that you have a lot more post inserted into your seat tube than is necessary (you have it inserted well below the minimum insertion line), you could buy a post that is that much shorter than your current one.

  3. #3
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    kdiddy,

    Thanks for the reply. I actually meant weight cause the Thomson website has the weight listed. To be honest, I don't know if the my current post is too long or short? I was just thinking of upgradring with a setback post so I can sit farther away from the handle bar and lean more to take some weight of my ass.

    Quote Originally Posted by kdiddy
    The diameter should be stamped right on there, typically below the minimum insertion line. I'm assuming that by weight, you actually mean length. Is your current post too short? Too long? MTB posts are typically 330 to 400 mm long, but again, I would measure your existing seatpost and go from there. If you find that you have a lot more post inserted into your seat tube than is necessary (you have it inserted well below the minimum insertion line), you could buy a post that is that much shorter than your current one.

  4. #4
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    From your description of what you are trying to acheive, it sounds like a longer stem might be what you're after. In general, the rule for bike fit is usually to set the seat height, then the seat fore and aft position, then set your reach by swapping stems. Start by placing one crank arm parallel with your seat tube (almost the six o'clock position), sit on your seat and place you heal on your pedal, above the spindle. You leg should be straight to slightly bent. This sets up your seat height. If it's too high, you will rock side to side when you pedal. Your post is too short if you see the minimum insertion line when you raise it to the proper height. You stress your frame if you raise it above this mark. The only reason to go with a shorter post would be to save some weight.
    Next set the pedals to the 3 and 9 position and place your feet so that the ball of your forward foot is above the axel of the pedal (or you are clipped in). If you drop a plumb line from the front of your knee while seated, it should go straight to the pedal spindle. Slide your seat forward or back on the post to set this up. If you can't slide it back far enough, then you could use a set back post or another post that has set back built into the clamp - usually a single bolt style clamp. After that, you set your handlebar height and distance by swapping stems or spacers under / above the stem. This is all stuff your LBS should have done when you bought the bike. If you lower the stem and increass its length (within reason), you will take weight off your butt and put it on you hands - like a road bike. You will also increase the tendency to go over the bars, so watch out.
    Last edited by kdiddy; 07-05-2006 at 01:25 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdiddy
    ...This is all stuff your LBS should have done when you bought the bike...
    thanks kdiddy. i went to a LBS and got measured. they adjusted the height of the handle bar and recommended a 30mm setback seatpost. what brand makes a 30mm setback seatpost.

  6. #6
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    They didnt just replace your stem? They should be able to do that.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kylejohn4543
    They didnt just replace your stem? They should be able to do that.
    did you mean, like swapping stems? i'm not sure if they'll do that since i didn't buy the bike from them. they did suggest changing the stem but decided to see how adjusting the spacers would work for now.

  8. #8
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    Swapping stems

    Swapping stems could be what you are really after, and they don't have to be that expensive either. I know my LBS has 20 or more stems hanging on the wall near the bike fitting area, to be swapped out during fitting sessions. Did you buy the bike from a local bike shop? If so, take it there and they should swap the stem for next to nothing. As far as posts go, most single bolt style posts will have an offset. Titecs come to mind, but there are lots and lots of others from cheap to expensive carbon models like an Easton EC70. If you want comfort, look into a Cane Creek Thudbuster. It has set back and suspension.

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