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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Suspension setup for new Fuel EX 9.8

    My Superfly is getting a roommate today...my Fuel Ex 9.8 is being built and ready for pick up later today

    I will read the setup info on their site, etc but hoping to get in a ride early tomorrow and could use some real world experience on proper pressures.

    Weigh around 165, no big air typical SoCal trails. As I've been on a hardtail for a few months, anything will seem plush. Prior to the Superfly it was a Blur XC. I ran the shock at my weight, and the fox fork around 75 lbs. pressure. Typically run tires around 38psi.

    Anyand all tips appreciated!

    btw...it's an '09, 15.5". Putting xtr pedals and a 105mm stem on it. Otherwise will leave as is for awhile.

    Mark

  2. #2
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    I weigh 145 and am running about 130 pounds of pressure in my rear shock--and it is still a plush ride (especially if you ride with the shock in the "open" position--which is still too plush for me so that I only use that for technical descents when in the mountains). That is a lot more air pressure than suggested by Fox, but it is working for me. If you are used to riding a hardtail and like that hardtail feel, I'd say pump that shock up higher than the recommended starting pressures.

  3. #3
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    thanks gatorback. I've got mine now at 150 and the sag is about 11mm. they recommend 12 mm sag, but give no pressure info anywhere (that I could find on the fox site). The trek site for '08 recommends 110 psi, which was ridiculously soft, and not accurate for the '09 shock imo.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark16q
    thanks gatorback. I've got mine now at 150 and the sag is about 11mm. they recommend 12 mm sag, but give no pressure info anywhere (that I could find on the fox site). The trek site for '08 recommends 110 psi, which was ridiculously soft, and not accurate for the '09 shock imo.
    I thought Trek was recommending something like 20-25 mm of sag. That was way too much for me. I want the bike to perform a little more like an XC race bike--something in between a pure trail bike and a pure XC bike.

    The Fox site also gives you info on the recommended PSI, but it is very low as well. The recommended pressure for me was something like 70 or 75 pounds.

    I think you are starting in the right place.

    By the way, I saw you other thread on some problems--I'd take it back to the shop to fix anything that isn't performing correctly after your first couple of rides. That is usually included as part of the sale so you shouldn't have to pay for necessary adjustments in say the first 30 days.

    With the XT components, I think you'll find they work just fine. I have older bikes with XT stuff on them and have never had problems with those components.

    On your cranks, I've got a set of 175mm XT cranks on my old bike. I am considering selling some of the parts on that bike, in addition to the Bontrager Rythm wheels that came with my EX 9.9. Let me know if you have an interest. I'm going to try to rise money for a singlespeed.

  5. #5
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    105mm stem is LONNGG

    Try a 70-80mm stem with slightly wider bars and you'll get better handling imo. Much shorter and it doesn't put you in a great position for XC race, you're too upright, but you'll get better handling and trail capabilities with a shorter stem and wider bars.

    As far as suspension setup, it used to be the case that xc sag setups were "run 10-15%" - bikes have changed these days and they're built to have the anti squat kick in deeper in the travel. You can run more sag and have it pedal well now, rather then just having it be super stiff. I think trek recommends around 20% for that bike. I'd start there.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gatorback
    I thought Trek was recommending something like 20-25 mm of sag. That was way too much for me. I want the bike to perform a little more like an XC race bike--something in between a pure trail bike and a pure XC bike.
    I think they recommend 25-30% sag - which equates to something like 12mm. 25mm of sag would be huge.

    I weigh 147ish and am running about 120lbs which is about 27% sag. Only one ride so far but it felt about right. Might add another 5lbs for the next ride.

  7. #7
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    150 psi at 160 pounds right now, and it was too stiff. Bike felt like it was a stink bug. But the forks at 75 were amazing. So I'll try about 135 or 140 to get the bike balanced and should be good to go.

    Ended up with a 110 stem and it's perfect for how I'm built....short legs and long torso.

    Thanks for the info and input,

    Mark

  8. #8
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    Did a thorough ride today with 130 psi. I measured at least five times and had about 11mm sag everytime, and figured with water etc should be close to 12.

    Anywho, the back was performing amazingly well downhill. Predictable, smooth and if anything felt it could be a bit softer. For climbing, I used the pro pedal that definitely helped with bouncing, but even without it not bad. I'll carry the pump for a few rides but think the 30psi spread is about where I like it.

    btw, the bike was amazing

    Mark

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