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Thread: No more Trek!!

  1. #1
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    New question here. No more Trek!!

    My carbon frame (pro Issue) broke 5 months ago and where is the LIFETIME WARRANTY??
    Im a only xc rider,no jumps ,no bunny-hops..
    Trek said :
    An "outside" force does not by imply the customer damaged the bicycle during an accident, nor does it imply the bicycle has been ridden violently. The frame may have been damaged while it was ridden without the customer noticing the damage. The frame may have been damaged during storage, that is to say it may have been hit by something without the owner's knowledge. The frame may have been damaged during transit without the owner's knowledge. There are a number of possibilities as to what may have happened to the frame.


    you can see my pics..







    Trek evaluated my warranty by this pics..sending on an email..
    I live Canary Island (Spain) and what about powerfull Trek..they decide by email..??

    I repeat..the frame broke climbing a hill on a road..no abuses or similar..

    I will not buy Trek never!! and some friends too..
    Im a active member of one of the most Mtb forums in Spanish

    you can ask for me there..

    Best regards from Spain
    Carbonboy..

    P.S. Sorry about my poor English

  2. #2
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    How about a shot of the whole frame?

  3. #3
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    I'm no engineer but I do know that carbon is subject to stress and will eventually fail. Seems to me that your frame just broke due to stress and not by an actual crash or hit. Please post a pic of the whole frame to see where it broke, to me seems like a chainstay but can tell for sure.

    Was the bike a hardtail, softtail or full suspension? Trek's F/S desing specially on the Fuel and Liquid lines depends on flex and it's not unusual to see frames break because of that.

    Recommendations? Take the frame to your Trek dealer and have it sent to Trek, this way they can inspect the damage and determine if warranty applies or not. Pics aren't the best way to approach a manufacturer for warranties.

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  5. #5
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    The break

    A couple of questions spring to mind when I am looking at your photos. Was the damage found before or after the chainstay protector was removed. If you removed the protector and then the damage occoured then you are in part responsible. In that carbon fiber is very prone to failure from notch propogation it would be importand to know what happened. In addition that vintage of Trek had chain suck issues that caused many failures that were proximal to the bottom bracket. If the bike had chainsucked and the chani had gone slack the contack point for the chain would be near your failure point. This is one of the downsides to CF and is not specific to Trek.

  6. #6
    Steep Hill
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    Trek Warranty

    Good advice to take it to a Trek dealer.

    I have broken (4) fuel ZR9000, (1) fuel98 OCLV carbon rear triangle, and (1) Fuel30 all-mountain frame, and Trek has certainly delivered on the Lifetime Warranty. This is key, (I'm not yelling).....EVERY INSTANCE TREK REQUIRES THE DEALER TO SEND THE ENTIRE BIKE IN FOR TREK EVALUATION. Doesn't sound like the same company to evaluate *.jpg pics.

    Side note: My Trek dealers hate to see me come in because they always try to charge me "re-building" fees. I always refuse to pay, until they send me home with the new frame. Shipping and rebuilding should also be covered under Trek's warranty.

    Good Luck,

    Steven in Scottsdale, AZ USA

  7. #7
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    undefinedtimes new roman
    Quote Originally Posted by AZClydesdale
    Good advice to take it to a Trek dealer.

    I have broken (4) fuel ZR9000, (1) fuel98 OCLV carbon rear triangle, and (1) Fuel30 all-mountain frame, and Trek has certainly delivered on the Lifetime Warranty. This is key, (I'm not yelling).....EVERY INSTANCE TREK REQUIRES THE DEALER TO SEND THE ENTIRE BIKE IN FOR TREK EVALUATION. Doesn't sound like the same company to evaluate *.jpg pics.

    Side note: My Trek dealers hate to see me come in because they always try to charge me "re-building" fees. I always refuse to pay, until they send me home with the new frame. Shipping and rebuilding should also be covered under Trek's warranty.

    Good Luck,

    Steven in Scottsdale, AZ USA

  8. #8
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    brib if i'm not mistaken...............

    isn't your frame very old?
    and i'm sure that it was made in the early days of manufacturing carbon frames when most manufacturers had breakages problems with carbon although now the process has been perfected and oclv frames are very strong,i'm surprised your frame has lasted intact for so long!

  9. #9
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    Trek will need a copy of your proof of purchace or a filled out warranty card for any warranty work to be done. Just so you know...

    Good luck, looks like you'll need it

  10. #10
    jcw
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    Steven just so you know...

    Quote Originally Posted by AZClydesdale
    Good advice to take it to a Trek dealer.

    I have broken (4) fuel ZR9000, (1) fuel98 OCLV carbon rear triangle, and (1) Fuel30 all-mountain frame, and Trek has certainly delivered on the Lifetime Warranty. This is key, (I'm not yelling).....EVERY INSTANCE TREK REQUIRES THE DEALER TO SEND THE ENTIRE BIKE IN FOR TREK EVALUATION. Doesn't sound like the same company to evaluate *.jpg pics.

    Side note: My Trek dealers hate to see me come in because they always try to charge me "re-building" fees. I always refuse to pay, until they send me home with the new frame. Shipping and rebuilding should also be covered under Trek's warranty.

    Good Luck,

    Steven in Scottsdale, AZ USA
    Trek does not cover the shipping and rebuilding fees for frame warranties, that's eaten by your dealer. Also Trek now usually only requires the broken portion of the frame to be sent in, not the whole frame, so shipping cost is reduced.
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

  11. #11
    Steep Hill
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    Jcw,

    Thanks JCW, I did not know that.

    On this lastest break, the dealer told me Trek requires the entire bike and they even need the seatpost I took off before they can ship it to Wisconsin. The Trek dealers covered all the costs on the first couple frame breaks then started charging me on the 4th and latest break. As a Trek customer it upsets me that the dealer sold me the Fuel when I first started riding and said, "This is the bike you should have for your size!", then breaks occur and Liquid Fuel comes along and they said, "Here is the bike you should have!", and now I ask to be bought out (for frame only) or traded into a sturdier brand and they won't do it. And now want to charge me for continuing to break frames. Btw, I paid $700 to be upgraded to the Liquid30. If I had a stock interest in Trek doing business this way, I'd certainly be rich...considering the Liquid Fuel costs about $300-400 to produce.

    Thanks JCW, and sorry to rant...I'm still a little sore about risking my safety.

    Steven

    Quote Originally Posted by jcw
    Trek does not cover the shipping and rebuilding fees for frame warranties, that's eaten by your dealer. Also Trek now usually only requires the broken portion of the frame to be sent in, not the whole frame, so shipping cost is reduced.

  12. #12
    Steep Hill
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    clarification....meant the frame only.

    Frame only of course. "$300-400 to produce a Liquid Fuel frame" is what I've heard from other shop owners.

    S

  13. #13
    jcw
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    Wow, I'd be sore too...

    Quote Originally Posted by AZClydesdale
    Thanks JCW, I did not know that.

    On this lastest break, the dealer told me Trek requires the entire bike and they even need the seatpost I took off before they can ship it to Wisconsin. The Trek dealers covered all the costs on the first couple frame breaks then started charging me on the 4th and latest break. As a Trek customer it upsets me that the dealer sold me the Fuel when I first started riding and said, "This is the bike you should have for your size!", then breaks occur and Liquid Fuel comes along and they said, "Here is the bike you should have!", and now I ask to be bought out (for frame only) or traded into a sturdier brand and they won't do it. And now want to charge me for continuing to break frames. Btw, I paid $700 to be upgraded to the Liquid30. If I had a stock interest in Trek doing business this way, I'd certainly be rich...considering the Liquid Fuel costs about $300-400 to produce.

    Thanks JCW, and sorry to rant...I'm still a little sore about risking my safety.

    Steven
    certainly sucks to have one broken frame, let alone 3 or 4 in a relatively short period. I agree, Trek should have treated you better, as it sounds like you've followed the dealers advice in choosing bikes. For the record, our shop never charges the customer for shipping or rebuilding costs related to warranty work, provided or course that the bike was purchased through us. But that's the dealers decision to make, and as I understand, most shops do charge for those things. I guess that perhaps we're lucky in that we have a great inside rep at Trek who's very easy to work with and always going the extra mile for us. I'm sure all rep's are not created equal. Anyway, in this instance, again Trek, I'm sure, would replace the broken frame with one of their own, but if you want a different brand, then it's the dealer that will wind up taking it in the shorts. I can understand your reluctance to accept another Trek, but that's the way the system works, and that's pretty much what you're stuck with unless you want to foot the bill. BTW, where did your Liquid break?
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

  14. #14
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    [SIZE=7]never buy a trek fullstop[/SIZE]

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by KleinAttitude
    [size=7]never buy a trek fullstop[/size]
    Ummmm....is that a new model or something ??? Haven't heard of the Trek fullstop....

  16. #16
    Steep Hill
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    Jcw,

    I would certainly love the Liquids if I could only loose a few more pounds! I ate a salad for lunch...so I'm on my way! haha

    I have frame breakage nightmares on certain descents or situations that would be detrimental to health. I appreciate your insight and comments JCW. Happy to say I've found a shop who is very supportive like your shop. Upon future breaks, they will take my warranty frame and cut me a deal on the next contender which at this time would be S.C Heckler. btw and unrelated that this shop is not a Trek dealer. Trek is a fine brand...I believe I am outside of the customer profile R&D.

    I believe in supporting shops like yours, as they are there to help us riders out.

    Notice the break on top tube and just below the front derailure. I inspect the frame frequently, but this crack got by me as did any telltale creaking. Ride on,

    Steven
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
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    That is a terrible break. The welds seem to be ok so the welds are not poor. It just looks like the material trek make the frames from are weak or a poor grade.

    What bike company makes xc and downhill bikes that take 65kg adult riders into consideration. The average adult rider should be between 80-110kg on large frame sizes.

    Infact where that break is there should have been heavy butting to reinforce the stress points.

    XC and downhill buy

    Mountain Cycles
    Yeti
    Turner
    Cannondale.

    All solid makes and mainly handbuilt in us with grade material.

  18. #18
    Steep Hill
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    Al-uminu-nu-nu-m

    The Liquid line uses Trek's ZR9000 aluminum with "Black Magic" flex stays included on the rear triangle. I am not an engineer nor expert on aluminums, but my guess is that a larger top and seat tube combined with a reinforcement of the stress area would add significant protection for the frame and rider. My $.02. Thanks for the future ride suggestions. Steven

  19. #19
    Virus
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    Quote Originally Posted by KleinAttitude
    What bike company makes xc and downhill bikes that take 65kg adult riders into consideration. The average adult rider should be between 80-110kg on large frame sizes.
    Are you suggesting that the Liquid is a downhill bike? I certainly hope not. . . . It's not even a freerider: It's a longer travel XC bike.

  20. #20
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    I just got a liquid 25

    I am very worried after seeing posts like these that my frame is going to brake the first time I use it. I don't do freeriding, but I do very challenging downhills. I've never done a drop over 3'+, but I may try it only if there is a downslope landing. I weigh about 68kg... should I have serious reservations about this bike? I bought it for XC, but I want to have confidence that if a 3' drop happens to be on the course I will feel safe hopping down it. That's another issue.. should I worry about hopping over logs.. I can hope around 14 inches now and hope to get up to 2'... should I worry about breaking the bike frame simply by hopping?

  21. #21
    Steep Hill
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    Recommend Liquid riders <91 kg

    Ride in confidence 'Busey!

    You match the rider profile Trek built the Fuels for, and certainly the sturdier Liquids. I love the handling of my Liquid, I torche it hard most all the time. I just cut out some of the more challenging descents. Keep in mind as mentioned above, Liquid is strictly XC and should never be ridden as DH.

    I recommend with great confidence the Fuel to a XC rider weighing less than 170 lbs (77 kgs). I recommend Liquid Fuel to any XC rider less than 200 lbs. (91 kgs). Any rider above this weight risks increasing catastrophic frame failure. I weigh 235lbs (106 kg) which I believe to be outside the Liquid strength-to-weight frame ratio.

    Don't be too hard on me. I didn't know any better in 2000 when I bought into Trek....and I trusted the dealer staff knew what they were talking about. As for you, enjoy that Liquid!

    PS - Please verify my lb/kg conversions...I'm exhausted!

    Steven


    Quote Originally Posted by ImWithBusey
    I am very worried after seeing posts like these that my frame is going to brake the first time I use it. I don't do freeriding, but I do very challenging downhills. I've never done a drop over 3'+, but I may try it only if there is a downslope landing. I weigh about 68kg... should I have serious reservations about this bike? I bought it for XC, but I want to have confidence that if a 3' drop happens to be on the course I will feel safe hopping down it. That's another issue.. should I worry about hopping over logs.. I can hope around 14 inches now and hope to get up to 2'... should I worry about breaking the bike frame simply by hopping?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZClydesdale
    Ride in confidence 'Busey!

    You match the rider profile Trek built the Fuels for, and certainly the sturdier Liquids. I love the handling of my Liquid, I torche it hard most all the time. I just cut out some of the more challenging descents. Keep in mind as mentioned above, Liquid is strictly XC and should never be ridden as DH.

    I recommend with great confidence the Fuel to a XC rider weighing less than 170 lbs (77 kgs). I recommend Liquid Fuel to any XC rider less than 200 lbs. (91 kgs). Any rider above this weight risks increasing catastrophic frame failure. I weigh 235lbs (106 kg) which I believe to be outside the Liquid strength-to-weight frame ratio.

    Don't be too hard on me. I didn't know any better in 2000 when I bought into Trek....and I trusted the dealer staff knew what they were talking about. As for you, enjoy that Liquid!

    PS - Please verify my lb/kg conversions...I'm exhausted!

    Steven
    What sort of drops should I avoid? How many feet would you say? Can I still hop in confidence? I enjoy jumping over logs and down steps on trails.

  23. #23
    Steep Hill
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    what not to do....

    Get a good feel for your new shock. Do this using the rubber ring. Check shock air pressure and tuck the ring tight up against the shock. After your ride visually note how far the shock extension went down. Adjust air pressure if needed and repeat on next ride. Eventually find the right pressure level keeping the shock a good distance away from bottoming out. You don't want to ride higher pressure than necessary, otherwise it will be more like a hardtail. When riding, do increasingly bigger drops over time. If you bottom out the shock on a jump and break the frame, it would likely be considered User Error for obvious reasons. Don't worry, just check it every ride. (quick way is to tuck the ring again, get on/off softly, then inspect the ring...it should be aprox 25-33% max of the total shock travel.

    What to do: Ride fearless on your Liquid! You could do 3' drops with a downward slope. This is no problem considering your weight. And various hops, logs, and stairs are no problem if you have the balance. With the shock dialed in to your weight, I bet you could do some awfully mighty drops and never have a problem. Knock yourself out. If the worst case happens and your frame breaks, Trek has excellent warranty service.

    What not to do: Fast DH speeds down a rocky trail with 1-3' steps. Big-air jumps, any stress that would cause the shock to fully compress and bottom out.

    (I have never bottomed out, by the way).

    Steven

  24. #24
    jcw
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    Don't be scared by the Trek bashers...

    Quote Originally Posted by ImWithBusey
    I am very worried after seeing posts like these that my frame is going to brake the first time I use it. I don't do freeriding, but I do very challenging downhills. I've never done a drop over 3'+, but I may try it only if there is a downslope landing. I weigh about 68kg... should I have serious reservations about this bike? I bought it for XC, but I want to have confidence that if a 3' drop happens to be on the course I will feel safe hopping down it. That's another issue.. should I worry about hopping over logs.. I can hope around 14 inches now and hope to get up to 2'... should I worry about breaking the bike frame simply by hopping?
    Trek's frames are very good quality. In 2002 (the most recent year I have figures for) Trek sold 1,235,560 bikes. A very small percentage had problems due to manufacturing defects. That's to be expected. Heck, even if their defect rate is as low as 0.5%, that's still over 6,000 bikes. But of course that also means that 99.5% (1,229,382) are fine. The Liquid is a very strudy frame and is designed for abusive riding - what would be considered light freeriding, you should have no problems. I do the same type of riding as you on a Scalpel - the lightest FS frame out there - with no problems. If you were doing 10' drops to flats, then you'd probably be better served by a true heavy FR/Downhill bike in the 40+ pound range, but it doesn't sound like that's in you future. Ride you bike hard and have fun!
    "The question before the human race is, whether the God of nature shall govern the world by his own laws, or whether priests and kings shall rule by fictitious miracles."
    John Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1815

  25. #25
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    AZ clydesdale about the 4 fuel zr9000 frames......

    Quote Originally Posted by AZClydesdale
    Good advice to take it to a Trek dealer.

    I have broken (4) fuel ZR9000, (1) fuel98 OCLV carbon rear triangle, and (1) Fuel30 all-mountain frame, and Trek has certainly delivered on the Lifetime Warranty. This is key, (I'm not yelling).....EVERY INSTANCE TREK REQUIRES THE DEALER TO SEND THE ENTIRE BIKE IN FOR TREK EVALUATION. Doesn't sound like the same company to evaluate *.jpg pics.

    Side note: My Trek dealers hate to see me come in because they always try to charge me "re-building" fees. I always refuse to pay, until they send me home with the new frame. Shipping and rebuilding should also be covered under Trek's warranty.

    Good Luck,

    Steven in Scottsdale, AZ USA
    az clydesdale can you tell me precisely where these breakages are located on the fuels?

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