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  1. #1
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    Navigator Rebuild

    I am a new member here and this is my first post on this forum. I have a 2005 Trek Navigator 100 that I bought new for $300.00 that has approximately 9,600 miles on it. For the first two years I had it I rode it about 100 miles or so. For the most part it sat in my livingroom collecting dust. Then I had a major health scare (I'm diabetic and almost died) and for the past three years I rode it an average of 10 to 15 miles a day, nearly every day. Weather and life issues permitting, of course.

    To make a long story short, riding this bike saved my life. So as you may guess, it means a lot to me. As you may also have guessed after nearly 10,000 miles, it was just about worn out. I debated whether to buy a new bike or not. Whether I do or not I planned to keep this bike anyway. But all the new bikes I looked at has something I didn't like about them. For my purposes, which are primarily street riding on nice quiet back streets, I like this bike. So after discussing it with my wife and the guys at my local bike shop I decided to rebuild it.

    I bought all Shimano Deore components (M-590 series I think) and a set of Sun Rhyno Lite double wall eyelet Rims with Shimano Deore 6-bolt disc brake mount hubs. Some stuff was replaced earlier, but including that I've replaced everything except the frame, the fork, and the headset. Between the components, new tires, etc., and labor I spent about $750.00, or about two and a half times what I originally paid for the bike to have the bike rebuilt.

    My question for you is this... Considering the sentimental value and all that, do you think I over did it?

  2. #2
    I hate that name.
    Reputation: blunderbuss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axel Slingerland
    do you think I over did it?
    Yes, but thats ok
    Worked at Trek/Fisher dealer 2008-2013. Only a little biased.

  3. #3
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    Whatever the case, she sure rides nice now. Smoooooth...

  4. #4
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    If the money spent keeps you from reverting back to your old lifestyle then NO! It's the best 750 bucks you'll ever spend!

    My congrats on doing something for your health that most americans never do: Take Responsibility!

  5. #5
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    Riding a lot was my old lifestyle until I retired. I was a working musician nearly all of my life, except for a few years working as a computer bench tech right before I retired. I had a bike that I rode about 5 to 10 miles at least three or four days a week when I was on the road. It seemed like that was the only time I ever had any time to myself.

    Then when I retired I became a homebody. I rented a house and never went anywhere. I spent most of my time sitting in front of my computer and my health started to decline. I did more harm to myself in 7 years of doing that than I did in almost 30 years on the road, staying in a different hotel practically every night, eating nothing but restaurant food, smoking three packs of cigarettes a day, and about a QP of herb a month...

    In 1998 I quit smoking herb, then cigarettes in 2006, and now I rarely ever go to restaurants anymore. I can't say I've become a health nut, but I sure am more aware of what I do to myself now days. Now that I've "got with the program" I'm an "educated diabetic" I practice tight glycemic control, and have kept my glucose levels under control for almost three years now. If you know what an A1c test is, a blood test that tells you what your average glucose control has been for the past 2 to 3 months, that was the "major health scare" I mentioned.

    My A1c was 12.6% in March of 2005, which is horrible. With meds and small improvements in my diet I lowered it to an average of about 8% to 9%. Then in December of 2007 it was up again to 10.4%, and my Doctor said "It's been nice knowing you" and that was the wake up call. I started riding every day again and within 6 months I had lost 75 pounds and got my A1c down to 7%. Now after three years of daily riding my average is about 5.5%.

    So yes, it has been worth it. My riding habits most likely will not change, unless I ride more. My bike is keeping me alive. And I am enjoying every minute of it...

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