Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,768

    Is my Superfly ok for all mountain use?

    I have a 2013 Trek Superfly 100 AL Pro. When I bought it, I didn't think I would use it for more than CX. But lately, I'm finding that all mountain/trail riding is way more fun.

    I'm just concerned that the fact that I'm 240 lbs is already stressing the bike and now I'm putting additional strain on the bike by going on harder trails. I'm not bottoming out my suspension or even getting air on these trails and I do no ride very hard or fast (yet--relatively new to this), but I'm a cautious person.

    I JUST got the bike to where I want it (tubeless, dropper, 1x10 conversion) so I don't want to get a different bike unless it's a hazard to my safety to use this bike in this manner.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    1,603
    You might switch the rims to the wider rhythms or another brand, but other than that, the bike should be fine.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,768
    Good to hear. I'm using about 90% of my travel at most and it's as plush as I need it to be. My next bike will be 120-150mm for sure but I'm hoping to push that off a year or two.

  4. #4
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
    Reputation: Zachariah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,319
    My 2012 SF 100 Pro carbon does 100% Trail/All-Mountain use. Granted, I had to change a few things; stronger brakes, wider wheels and tires. The bike absolutely RIPS the rough stuff now. At just under 24 pounds(with pedals) I now have a bike that keeps me smiling all-day long, instead of grimacing...
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  5. #5
    Trail Ninja
    Reputation: Varaxis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    2,798
    I used my 2010 SF 100 for trail riding and doing some chair lift assisted riding at Big Bear and Mammoth until all the parts started wearing out and I decided to buy a bigger bike. Great memories on it! Just a wheel, tire, front rotor, and dropper post change and it was solid. I used i9 Enduro wheels on it... not light, but it held up admirably and the instant engagement enabled me to ride some techy stuff. I'm 140 lbs though... not so sure about 240. My heavier buddy was surprised I could do so much on it and attributed it to my weight.

    The bigger bikes (plural) I got after it haven't been ridden much. I much prefer a versatile short travel trail bike that's more XC oriented, but can handle bike park stuff. Tough finding an affordable one that looks good and is stout as I like, yet doesn't make things too easy.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    357
    A 100mm bicycle isn't obviously AM oriented (as a AM bicycle isn't XC) but this doesn't mean that it can't handle AM stuff. So if you mainly do XC and occasionally AM and some gravity you should be fine. But if it is ths opposite then you should look for a ΑΜ bicycle instead.

    In any case stronger rims and brakes and more AM tires should help. For example I do almost anything with my 130mm Fuel but I have changed my rims to Fulcrum Red Zone, my tires to tubeless Bontrager XR4 and my groupset to 2x10 XT plus XT brakes. And I also added a dropper post.

    So now I have a bicycle that can do almost anything except of course for some gravity stuff.

    PS. Considering the cost I could have bought a more AM bicycle in the first place but I do 50% uphill and 50% downhill (not hardcore) so the Fuel is almost perfect for this. I also had the opportunity to choose the components I wanted instead of the ones included in a ready bicycle.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,768
    Thanks for the input. I'm already tubeless with an AM tire up front (Purgatory 29x2.3), dropper post, and XT brakes.

    I do 90% AM (but again--no jumping and "air" would be no more than 1 foot off the ground), and 10% XC but the AM trails aren't that intense.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    357
    Then you are OK. Enjoy!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,768
    If I can find a frame/shock/fork for $1,500 or less (or frame/shock @ $1,000 and buy fork separately) with 120-160mm travel I'll probably do that and swap my parts over and sell what I have for a slight out of pocket expense.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    357
    That would also make sense if you can afford it. Just make sure that you really need it.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,768
    I don't feel like I need it... I just don't want to crack the frame or something and end up hurt!

    I usually get more tool than I need for a job so I never break things but this time I feel like I'm using less tool than I should have.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    357
    Unless you do gravity stuff you should be fine. Frames don't brake with regular trial and all mountain use. However if you feel better having more bicycle than you need it is up to you. Just make sure you won't result in just carrying around unnecessary weight for your type of riding.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,366
    Small air and 1ft drops are well within the bounds of what a XC bike's design spec is. A longer travel bike may well allow you to get more confident doing any bigger stuff which you come across.
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

  14. #14
    J79
    J79 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    97
    Hi there, how did you route the cable for your dropper on the SF frame?

    I'm looking to fit a (thomsom) dropper post myself, having a hard time to decide wether or not I should get a stealth dropper or not...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,768
    I can take a pic if you want but I have 3 zip ties. There's 2 spots maybe 6" apart right where the top tube reaches the down tube and headset area then I tied another one to part of the rear shock bracket. Works perfectly.

    different years may be different though...

  16. #16
    J79
    J79 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    97
    Ok, think I got the Idea. My SF frame has got an opening near the top of the shock, for the shock remote, which I do not use. I can route an external remote cable into that opening and have the remote coming out near the headset.
    An external cable seems easier serviceable than an complete internal routing. Now to figure out which post, thomson has got the looks, gravity the reputation....

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,768
    Loving my Fox DOSS

Similar Threads

  1. 2013 Superfly Elite SL vs. Superfly Comp.
    By ghostchili in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-29-2012, 09:36 AM
  2. 2012 Superfly 100 Elite vs. Superfly 100 (base)
    By Andy13 in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-12-2012, 04:38 AM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-02-2012, 08:15 AM
  4. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-12-2012, 01:02 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-19-2011, 06:12 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •