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  1. #3601
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    Yeah, it says on Manitou's site that the Machete 120 is convertible to 110.

  2. #3602
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    Yeah, it says on Manitou's site that the Machete 120 is convertible to 110.
    They have a 140mm spring avail that may have worked, but after taking it apart, its just not well built enough compared to the Magnum for me to push its boundaries, my wife will never reach that forks limit....
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  3. #3603
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    I have a trek stache 9.6 with line plus wheels, stock chupacabra tires, considering the maxxis minion DHR2 and DHF tires. Any impressions on how these feel compared to the chupacabras? Would they be better in winter? I'm a little concerned the added weight may make the bike feel less fun and responsive. Looking at 29x3.0 by the way, since there's someone selling a front and rear for a lot cheaper than lbs.

  4. #3604
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    You're looking at adding a full pound of rotating weight, so yeah, the first few rides will let the wind out of your sails for sure, but if the Chups are slowing you down because of traction, then Minions will be faster. Reviews on them are positive, but they'll be harder to push for sure.

    It all depends on your terrain. They're a bit of Overkill for my trails. The Chup or Ranger is perfect.

    I'm thinking if you have an area where gravity will help you out, then they'd be wonderful.

  5. #3605
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    You're looking at adding a full pound of rotating weight, so yeah, the first few rides will let the wind out of your sails for sure, but if the Chups are slowing you down because of traction, then Minions will be faster. Reviews on them are positive, but they'll be harder to push for sure.

    It all depends on your terrain. They're a bit of Overkill for my trails. The Chup or Ranger is perfect.

    I'm thinking if you have an area where gravity will help you out, then they'd be wonderful.
    Chelboed nailed it.

    The minions are awesome, mainly when the trail points down though. It takes a little more leg to get them going.
    Too Many .

  6. #3606
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    The Chupacabras are pretty light for what they are, but they are also relatively slow rolling tires.

    Rangers (in both 'light/fast', and 'tough/fast') are noticeably faster rolling than the Chupacabras. I, and many others have found that the light/fast Rangers are susceptible to cuts in harsher conditions. I have had good luck with the tough/fast Rangers as far as durability is concerned. I don't find them to be particularly slow when climbing, although I do find myself to be particularly slow when climbing. The Rangers do not wear as well as the Chupacabras, but they do cost less. Name your poison.For now, I prefer the Rangers in tough/fast form, but I have not tried the Minions.

  7. #3607
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    Thanks for the feedback on the tires. I was getting a little cautious when I noticed a couple sets of the maxis minions for sale locally with almost no use, from Stache's. The terrain I ride I don't need the stiction they provide with the compromise of being much heavier. The wtb's sound like a good way to go as I don't ride super rocky stuff typically.

  9. #3609
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barman1 View Post
    Hard to say really.
    What would be the difference on a rear wheel locking up on dirt with a 203mm vs stock sizing?
    Sure it would lock easier, but a locked wheel is a locked wheel.
    That was probably the reason he smirked. I've ridden with him a few times and he's maybe 160lbs but rides and crashes like a pro.
    Some folks are just rough on things.
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    I have been running a 203mm rear (and front) rotor for over a year on my Stache 9, and I am north of 250 lbs. Not saying it can't happen, but it's not guaranteed to happen. I smoked a few IceTech 180mm rotors, so I don't have much choice.
    This is a double edge topic of sorts. I'm not a skidder. I don't lock my rear wheel up. I have slowed down fast enough to cause my 180mm rotor to warp from heat deformation. I know because after I stopped, I spun the wheel and the rotor intermittently rubbed until it cooled down. A big rider on 29x3" tires will create a lot of traction. You can make use of a 203mm rotor based on heat dissipation alone.

    But take into consideration a full on downhill rig running 27.5x2.5 wheelset. You can easily assume that since you're pointing downhill, most of your brake power will be utilized up front. You could likely lock up the rear with one finger very easily. But most DH rigs run big rotors.

    Why do they even make a 203 rotor then? Your saying that because it doesn't apply to you, then it doesn't help anyone. But I've been in situations where just aggressive trail riding would be better served on a Stache with larger rotors.

    Maybe I don't wanna squeeze my finger that hard. Maybe I want to keep my rotors cooler.


    I guess that's why I think that a 200# plus rider running 29x3" which creates more leverage against brakes with it's extra large diameter and has more traction than most trail bike with it's extra wide footprint...would benefit from a larger rotor.

    Anyone can death grip a brake and skid, but experienced, controlled braking is better for the trail and better for my expensive tires.

  10. #3610
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    I've ridden down Lower Wilsons Creek in Pisgah, 1800' descent, fast fast and flowy on the brakes lots with the 180mm RT76 ice tech rotors with 0 issues from heat buildup, where 2 friends with sram rotors that had issues at the bottom of the hill.
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  11. #3611
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    Mine are Ice Tech 180's.

    Not saying I "need" 203, but there's a reason they're made. I think it would be fun to have that much braking power.

  12. #3612
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    I'm running Hope Tech E4 with 180 f&r on my '16 Stache 9 at 200lbs and my frame is fine after a season and a half.
    Also installed a 140mm Machete to help on the steep quick descents around here. No issues on the head tube, and I had no face plants this season! Unlike the last one...

  13. #3613
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barman1 View Post
    I'm running Hope Tech E4 with 180 f&r on my '16 Stache 9 at 200lbs and my frame is fine after a season and a half.
    Also installed a 140mm Machete to help on the steep quick descents around here. No issues on the head tube, and I had no face plants this season! Unlike the last one...
    Pics on the machete 140! I've run mine with a 140mm Magnum Comp in 27.5 + mode before, lots of fun
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  14. #3614
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Don't Surf View Post
    Pics on the machete 140! I've run mine with a 140mm Magnum Comp in 27.5 + mode before, lots of fun
    I don't really have a profile view to show but this should give you an impression.
    This is an XL frame and the dropouts are almost at the farthest forward and this thing still climbs like a goat with the taller fork.
    Oh, and the Minions don't hurt either. Best tire out of the 4 different brands I've used.
    No dropper, Thomson setback post, 50mm stem, and the rear wheel was popping a spoke per ride so installed the straight pull Duroc.
    Now the front wheel is making funny noises.
    Never thought I could stress out a front Mulefut enough to pop a spoke but it'll happen soon.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  15. #3615
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    High rise bars rule!

  16. #3616
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    High rise bars rule!
    At my height, definitely.

  17. #3617
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    Here is my XL winter mode on.
    Lets see your Stache official thread-img_20171210_124950399.jpg

  18. #3618
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barman1 View Post
    At my height, definitely.
    How tall are you, and what's your inseam?

    I'm only around 6'1"-6'1.5" but I've got a short torso and long inseam for my height 44.5-45". Thus I run a Large frame, but with 180mm crankset and a bit of stack b/c I like to sit more upright.

    I ordered a Shadow Conspiracy conical spacer and run 4x2mm and 3x5mm under my 70x7deg stem and a 1" rise bar. I'd rather run a 45mm rise bar and lose some of that extra spacer under the stem, but they didn't have the right rise SQLabs 12deg sweep bar for me at the time, so I left myself a bit of extra room to play when I installed the Yari. My steerer is 10mm longer than my stock Machete was.

    In all honesty, I'd likely be better off running an XL frame with 30-40mm rise bars, b/c the reach is:
    2017 Aluminum: 436mm
    2018 Large:445
    2018 XL:464

    So I'm looking at a 28mm longer cockpit with a 24mm increase in stack. That would drop my bar stack spacers down an inch and drop my stem length down to 40mm. (which would be a tough size to find)


    Only real issue with that is the HTA. My 2017 aluminum is a great match to the 140mm fork and I love how it sits. Moving to the new geo, I'd be sitting at 66.4deg HTA on the Stache which could possibly push it too slack for a trail bike given it's intended design.

    If I ever find an old model aluminum geo in XL, I may try to snag it, but for now I like the how the Lg is fitting so I'm sticking widdit. It's hell being right on the edge of one size or another.

  19. #3619
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    Stock + 60mm stem and 1"rise bars
    Lets see your Stache official thread-screenshot_20171202-121906.jpg


    This was my first conical spacer, but it looked weird to me, so I switched to black and back to a 70mm stem to open up the cockpit a hair:
    Lets see your Stache official thread-img_20171118_1004500i52-picsay.jpg


    This is where I'm at now:
    Lets see your Stache official thread-img_20171208_170057272-picsay.jpg

    The black looks like it's more seemless to the frame so it doesn't look so crazy stacked.



    It feels perfect now.

  20. #3620
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    How tall are you, and what's your inseam?

    I'm only around 6'1"-6'1.5" but I've got a short torso and long inseam for my height 44.5-45". Thus I run a Large frame, but with 180mm crankset and a bit of stack b/c I like to sit more upright.

    I ordered a Shadow Conspiracy conical spacer and run 4x2mm and 3x5mm under my 70x7deg stem and a 1" rise bar. I'd rather run a 45mm rise bar and lose some of that extra spacer under the stem, but they didn't have the right rise SQLabs 12deg sweep bar for me at the time, so I left myself a bit of extra room to play when I installed the Yari. My steerer is 10mm longer than my stock Machete was.

    In all honesty, I'd likely be better off running an XL frame with 30-40mm rise bars, b/c the reach is:
    2017 Aluminum: 436mm
    2018 Large:445
    2018 XL:464

    So I'm looking at a 28mm longer cockpit with a 24mm increase in stack. That would drop my bar stack spacers down an inch and drop my stem length down to 40mm. (which would be a tough size to find)


    Only real issue with that is the HTA. My 2017 aluminum is a great match to the 140mm fork and I love how it sits. Moving to the new geo, I'd be sitting at 66.4deg HTA on the Stache which could possibly push it too slack for a trail bike given it's intended design.

    If I ever find an old model aluminum geo in XL, I may try to snag it, but for now I like the how the Lg is fitting so I'm sticking widdit. It's hell being right on the edge of one size or another.
    I'm at 78" with a 36" inseam. (I'm thinking you meant 34-35" for yours?)
    I wouldn't be too concerned about the hta when the bike is static.
    With sag and varied riding positions that's going to change with a tall fork as it compresses.
    I don't find that it has much of an influence on handling, just puts the front end up enough to keep my face from planting when negotiating the nasty stuff.
    The 110mm stock fork was close to hazardous when fully compressed on rock face drops and while I can't put all the blame on the equipment it did put me over the bars (and the E-room once) a few times.
    I kept the cockpit pretty much the same by shortening the stem to 40 or 50mm (can't recall exactly) and installing the setback post.
    180mm cranks would be unwise on my trails due to conditions but I know I'd enjoy the longer crankset.
    I remember years ago I went from a 170mm to 175mm and it was a revelation.

  21. #3621
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug_ID View Post
    Was your CF frame cracked? Was it the bike shop denying claim or Trek HQ?
    I responded again not remembering your nick. I tried to delete this but can't seem to find the button. Ignore me. Move along.

  22. #3622
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    2016 Stache 5 modified with 11 speed drivetrain, Magnum 120 fork, XT brakes and other personal items changed.
    I have worn out several sets of tires and tried quite a few.
    Chupacabras 3.0
    Vee trax fatty 3.0
    Nobby Nics Addix compound in 2.6 width
    Maxxis Minion DHF 3.0
    Duro Crux 3.25 up front
    Vittoria Bomboloni 3.0

    Tire Synopsis.
    1. Vee Trax Fatty 3.0 Self steers up front. Good price and decent back tire. Probably wouldn't get again.
    2. Chuacabras 3.0 Overall good tire but a little spendy. Don't know if I would get again.
    3. Nobby Nics 2.6 Addix compound. Great tire. Rolls well but really too small for the Stache. They now live on my 29er ti bike.
    4. Maxxis Minion 3.0. Tire really impressed me after replacing the Chupacabra. More confidence inspiring but kind of a pig. Don't know if I would buy again. I have run it front and rear. Still good amount of tread on it but it now just sits as a spare.
    5. Vittoria Bombolini 3.0. Not a true 3 inch tire. I measure around 2.8 inches wide and not nearly the volume as some of the others. Sort of reminds me of a smaller Chupacabra. I bought a pair but both wobbled. Vittoria stepped up to the plate and sent me a new pair that are dead on straight. Kind of pricey. Got a good deal on the pair but wouldn't pay full price for sure. One now sits on the back of my Stache and the other one on the front of my Ti 29er.
    6. Duro Crux 3.25. Blows all the others away! Good traction, super amount of volume and they roll very nice. I really want one in the back and I know very soon I will somehow justify buying another tire! Turns the Stache into a monster truck!

    I have thousands of miles on my Stache and it is my favorite bike ever. Use it for trail riding and also lots of bikepacking.

    Hate the one by gearing range so I slapped a double up front and shift by hand.

    Lets see your Stache official thread-404.jpg

    Lets see your Stache official thread-403.jpg

    Lets see your Stache official thread-10.jpg
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  23. #3623
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    6. Duro Crux 3.25. Blows all the others away! Good traction, super amount of volume and they roll very nice. I really want one in the back and I know very soon I will somehow justify buying another tire! Turns the Stache into a monster truck!
    Does the Stache have enough clearance for this one in the back?

  24. #3624
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    Did you set up the Duro Crux 3.25's tubeless? Any problems with that?

    I see you can get them at Jones Bikes for $85? - or here for less: https://www.unicycle.uk.com/duro-cru...roducts_tabbed

    At unicycle they are listed at 1.2KG +/- Do you know what they weigh?

  25. #3625
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    Quote Originally Posted by revdandom View Post
    Does the Stache have enough clearance for this one in the back?
    One guy put one on the back of his Stache with studs so I assume yes.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  26. #3626
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    Quote Originally Posted by gchapman View Post
    Did you set up the Duro Crux 3.25's tubeless? Any problems with that?

    I see you can get them at Jones Bikes for $85? - or here for less: https://www.unicycle.uk.com/duro-cru...roducts_tabbed

    At unicycle they are listed at 1.2KG +/- Do you know what they weigh?
    I got mine from Jones. Probably 1100 to 1200 grams.

    They are not tubeless rated but I am running mine tubeless.
    Had to use a tube initially, then cracked one side to take out tube and put in valve stem then it aired up easily tubeless. Wouldn't hold air for a while but added more sealant, laid on both sides and then after a couple days no problem keeping them aired up. I think I am running around 4 ounces of sealant.

    Not a weight weenie tire for sure. My bike is not light after adding front shock, leather saddle, dropper post, mirror, lights, bags, water in the frame bag, food and some layers. It is much heavier than when it came stock rigid but the only thing I notice is that it is faster and more capable.

    If weight was such a big deal I would have stuck to rigid 26ers!
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  27. #3627
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    I looked at the UK website. By the time you add shipping to the US I think it is more.

    I had no problem ordering from Jones. Only took a couple of days to get it. From Oregon to So Cal.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  28. #3628
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    That's a great tire report man, thanks!! I can't imagine going from an 870g Chup to a 1200g Crux. That's stinkin' 330g. That's 3/4# rotating weight per tire. My legs hurt just thinking about it.

    But then there's all that roll over and the fact you can go lower psi.

    Hmm...

  29. #3629
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    Great tire report as well, thanks for the info. For me the chupas still seem like the best way to go for me for my local trails and still keep the bike light and lively. The Duro Crux do sound enticing though for a little extra squish, must almost feel like mini fat-bike at that point.

  30. #3630
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    I would almost say that it's worth a thought to put a Crux on the rear and a Chup or Ranger up front so you can run lower psi in the rear and smooth out the ride whereas the front has a suspension fork to smooth out the ride. As Ryawesome stated...you're getting close to fat bike territory, may as well run a Farley with 27.5x4"...thought this changes the whole geometry of the ride.


    If any of you are old enough to remember back in the day when people ran a 24x3" Gaza on the rear and a 26x2.35 / 2.5 up front. The OD wasn't terribly different, but you could run a lower psi out back and still not pinch flat.


    Ideally, the most similar corresponding setup to what we used to do would be a 27.5x4" rear and a 29x3" front, giving you the same diameter circle, but with more rubber on the rear and more rim on the front.

  31. #3631
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    I would almost say that it's worth a thought to put a Crux on the rear and a Chup or Ranger up front so you can run lower psi in the rear and smooth out the ride whereas the front has a suspension fork to smooth out the ride. As Ryawesome stated...you're getting close to fat bike territory, may as well run a Farley with 27.5x4"...thought this changes the whole geometry of the ride.


    If any of you are old enough to remember back in the day when people ran a 24x3" Gaza on the rear and a 26x2.35 / 2.5 up front. The OD wasn't terribly different, but you could run a lower psi out back and still not pinch flat.


    Ideally, the most similar corresponding setup to what we used to do would be a 27.5x4" rear and a 29x3" front, giving you the same diameter circle, but with more rubber on the rear and more rim on the front.
    I have always been from the school of thought that the bigger wider tire should go up front to keep the front tire from washing out before the back one does. I now run a 29 by 3.0 (really 2.8) Bomboloni in the back. However it won't be long (hopefully some Christmas money!) before I put a Crux on the back.

    I know how a fat bike handles and pedals because I had one years ago. Never liked it as much as I tried. Even though the tire was only 3.8 inches wide it self steered badly, was bouncy and did not feel very precise handling.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  32. #3632
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    This is true, depending on your riding style and desired purpose. If you're just traversing trail and want more cushion, then wider in back. If you're riding aggressively, then most people these days put a same or smaller tire on the back.

    Look at Motocross. Shorter rear wheel, wider fatter tire on the back. Taller wheel, narrower tire in front. That was our school of thought back then with running a fat 24 on back with a normal 26 up front. (This was on hardtails) I feel like the Chupacabra gets plenty of traction. I wouldn't mind a tad more squish in the back though.

  33. #3633
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ Freightrain View Post
    ok,its been done !! completed the upgrades on my 2018 Stache 7..have about 80 miles on her now and completely surprised and happy with the ride..Upgrades ...Chromag Squarewave XL grips,Hope Pro4 orange hubs,Raceface Arc 40 wheels,carbon seat post,Raceface 800 mm orange bars and 70mm bontrager line stemAttachment 1155115Attachment 1155116Attachment 1155117
    How are you liking your 2018 stache7? I was looking at the 9.7 but cant get past the orange color scheme so now im considering the 7. Does the bike still ride pretty comfy with the 3 inch tires even though its an aluminum frame?

  34. #3634
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    Quote Originally Posted by DTL View Post
    How are you liking your 2018 stache7? I was looking at the 9.7 but cant get past the orange color scheme so now im considering the 7. Does the bike still ride pretty comfy with the 3 inch tires even though its an aluminum frame?
    I wonder if you were to do a blind test if you could really feel the difference between an alloy frame and a carbon frame? Particularly when we are running such large tires at lower pressures. In fact I would suggest even a little bit lower tire pressure makes a bigger difference in feel vs. frame material.

    I know my stache rides smoother than my ti 29er hardtail bike which I mostly attribute to bigger tires with less pressure. I know my identical ti 29er bike with a rigid fork and 44 c road tires is much harsher than the ti 29er hardtail.

    Sheldon Brown (RIP) claims that bike geometry has a lot more to do with comfort than frame material.

    Peronally I prefer aluminum over carbon particularly in the rough and tumble world of mountain biking where I tend to scrape the crap out of my frame in HAB and ride lots of miles.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  35. #3635
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    Quote Originally Posted by DTL View Post
    How are you liking your 2018 stache7? I was looking at the 9.7 but cant get past the orange color scheme so now im considering the 7. Does the bike still ride pretty comfy with the 3 inch tires even though its an aluminum frame?
    I have riden both frame types now and think the ride quaility differences are pretty minimal.

  36. #3636
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    Ordered up a Duro Crux from Jeff Jones on Wednesday and they were in my mail box Saturday. Mounted them up today and took them out for a good test ride.

    Unlike the front one the rear aired up without having to resort to using a tube initially and much to my surprise and delight they hold air without having to go through the gyrations that I had to with the front one.

    Great rear tire. These tires make the bike feel very predictable and planted. They seem to handle the loose over hard and loose off camber much better than all the other tires I have had on my Stache.

    Weight?? Well ya they are heavier than some but seem to roll as well or better than all the others.

    On a steep uphill that alway tests me they climbed with aplomb and I recorded my 3rd best time ever and that is without giving it my all.

    On the downhills they just rock and feel much more secure than the others including the 3.0 minion I had up front.

    Tire clearance is good side to side but tighter towards the seat tube. I have my strangleholds all the way back (the way they came).

    Great Christmas gift!

    Lets see your Stache official thread-2.jpg

    Lets see your Stache official thread-1.jpg
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  37. #3637
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    Ordered up a Duro Crux from Jeff Jones on Wednesday and they were in my mail box Saturday. Mounted them up today and took them out for a good test ride.

    Unlike the front one the rear aired up without having to resort to using a tube initially and much to my surprise and delight they hold air without having to go through the gyrations that I had to with the front one.

    Great rear tire. These tires make the bike feel very predictable and planted. They seem to handle the loose over hard and loose off camber much better than all the other tires I have had on my Stache.

    Weight?? Well ya they are heavier than some but seem to roll as well or better than all the others.

    On a steep uphill that alway tests me they climbed with aplomb and I recorded my 3rd best time ever and that is without giving it my all.

    On the downhills they just rock and feel much more secure than the others including the 3.0 minion I had up front.

    Tire clearance is good side to side but tighter towards the seat tube. I have my strangleholds all the way back (the way they came).

    Great Christmas gift!

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    Very tempted to order those tires. Do you think they would for with the dropout at the half way postion? Still have life left in my chupas, so going to wait till those wear, hopefully by then the xr4s will be available and I will have a choice between those and the crux

  38. #3638
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libikerdad View Post
    Very tempted to order those tires. Do you think they would for with the dropout at the half way postion? Still have life left in my chupas, so going to wait till those wear, hopefully by then the xr4s will be available and I will have a choice between those and the crux
    I wouldn't bring the drops any further forward. Just order one and try it before you do the full on commitment.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  39. #3639
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    I wouldn't bring the drops any further forward. Just order one and try it before you do the full on commitment.
    I hear you, I already have them at the half way point and enjoy how it rides like that for my local trails. May just have to order them to try them out though, at least for the winter months

  40. #3640
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    I wonder if you were to do a blind test if you could really feel the difference between an alloy frame and a carbon frame? Particularly when we are running such large tires at lower pressures. In fact I would suggest even a little bit lower tire pressure makes a bigger difference in feel vs. frame material.

    I know my stache rides smoother than my ti 29er hardtail bike which I mostly attribute to bigger tires with less pressure. I know my identical ti 29er bike with a rigid fork and 44 c road tires is much harsher than the ti 29er hardtail.

    Sheldon Brown (RIP) claims that bike geometry has a lot more to do with comfort than frame material.

    Peronally I prefer aluminum over carbon particularly in the rough and tumble world of mountain biking where I tend to scrape the crap out of my frame in HAB and ride lots of miles.
    I went from an aluminum to a carbon frame and can definitely tell the difference. Even though you're on larger squishy tires, the amount of compliance and vibration damping are noticeably improved and I am very confident I could tell the difference on any trail.

  41. #3641
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    Quote Originally Posted by tgent13 View Post
    I went from an aluminum to a carbon frame and can definitely tell the difference. Even though you're on larger squishy tires, the amount of compliance and vibration damping are noticeably improved and I am very confident I could tell the difference on any trail.
    Gotta agree here as well. Went to carbon stache from aluminum stache and this was my experience as well. Same trails yet my body doesnt feel as beat up. Some trails I feel better after riding the carbon stache than I do on the full sus.

    Sent from my SM-T900 using Tapatalk

  42. #3642
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    Out for a dash in a little snow.
    Lets see your Stache official thread-stache.jpg

  43. #3643
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    Here is my current stable. Both frame up builds.

    - '16 Stache 29+ with Rockshox Yari and SRAM GX Eagle

    - '17 Domane SL Disc with SRAM Rival 1x11 Hydro Disc.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  44. #3644
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    Nice!! I really like the Yari so far on my '17 set at 140mm. Shipped with 3x tokens, I added one and dropped it to 80psi for my 215-220 riding weight. Plenty of low speed sensitivity and I haven't bottomed it out yet.

    I was able to sell my Duroc wheelset and Machete fork to fund my Yari completely, so I'm not out any coin on it.


    I'm not running Eagle, but I'm XT 1x11 with a 30t NW front and only 11-40 rear. I could bump that all the way to 46, but I really don't feel like I need it. 30:40 has been ample so far.


    Wouldn't mind dropping a few lbs, but I'd have to go back to the drawing board on the entire build to save 50g here / 100g there, etc...and it's just not worth it.


    I'm sitting at 29lbs even and it's a good strong build that will last a long time, I hope.

  45. #3645
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    Carbon Stache / Rango frame on eBay: sub $500
    Lets see your Stache official thread-capture.jpg


    Makes me wonder if Trek is actually sourcing their frames from iCan in China, slapping their logos on there and marking them up 300%..

  46. #3646
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    Trek carbon is produced at the Giant factory last I knew. Those knock off frames have different rear dropouts, and much higher rear Chain stay angle by memory
    ------------------------------------------------------
    "Loud hubs save lives!"

  47. #3647
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    Looks just like the Rango dropout. I wonder if they outsourced the Rango.

  48. #3648
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    Carbon Stache / Rango frame on eBay: sub $500
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    Makes me wonder if Trek is actually sourcing their frames from iCan in China, slapping their logos on there and marking them up 300%..
    It's a copy of the Stache, the company making the knock off do this with a variety of frames and clearly can do it cheaper since they don't have to design the frame nor support it afterwards.
    2014 Trek Fuel Ex 8
    2015 Trek Farley 6
    2016 Trek Stache 7

  49. #3649
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    Recently got a 2017 Stache 5 at a discount (possibly the last one here in Oz), but it didn't come with a manual for the Manitou Machete fork; the dealer had lost it, if one was ever supplied. I tried Googling and looking at the Manitou site but nada on setup or controls. They have a "Danger, Will Robinson!" thing with no useful info, and a service manual but I couldn't find anything else.

    If anyone has a link, that would really help, as would some idea of what PSI to start with for a 150 lb rider, or what % sag to try. Thanks!

  50. #3650
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    Just like any suspension fork, it's going to be personal preference. Anywhere between 25-30% sag to start out with should be a good jumping-off point. I'd say in the neighborhood of 75-80psi'ish maybe?

    Use a somewhat loose zip-tie on the stanchion to mark the sag. If you take it out at 25% and it feels too harsh, try dropping some air to 30%. If you try at 30% and bottom out too much, add some air.

    I found myself running less psi than recommended on this fork b/c I didn't shred the gnar on it really hard. It was a pretty plush ride.

  51. #3651
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    Thanks. The problem is that I didn't get any documentation, and couldn't find anything online; I actually *like* to RTFM. :-)

  52. #3652
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    Recently got a 2017 Stache 5 at a discount (possibly the last one here in Oz), but it didn't come with a manual for the Manitou Machete fork; the dealer had lost it, if one was ever supplied. I tried Googling and looking at the Manitou site but nada on setup or controls. They have a "Danger, Will Robinson!" thing with no useful info, and a service manual but I couldn't find anything else.

    If anyone has a link, that would really help, as would some idea of what PSI to start with for a 150 lb rider, or what % sag to try. Thanks!
    There should be a decal affixed to the stanchion with some general psi guidelines to get you started

  53. #3653
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    ^ There is! Now I feel dumb, but previous forks didn't have this; they came with a manual though. So the only adjustments are PSI, lockout and rebound damping, right? (Without changing oil level, etc.)

  54. #3654
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barman1 View Post
    There should be a decal affixed to the stanchion with some general psi guidelines to get you started
    That's funny...I assumed that it had been removed, hehehehe.

  55. #3655
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    Set sag, then rebound, then compression. Should be no need to mess with oil "level"...you can change viscosity if you ride in really cold weather, but the level should remain static.

  56. #3656
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    Thanks again. :-)

    AFAIK, there's no compression adjustment, so it's just air pressure/sag and rebound damping. As I'm in Sydney, AU, really cold weather means ~50įF, so probably not an issue.

  57. #3657
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    Hey all, I've got my 14 stache 7 for sale in the classifieds if you are up in the Northern Utah area. Only had like 2 rides on it last summer so I'm having a hard time justifying keeping it.

  58. #3658
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    When you re-tape your shitty Mulefuts and one of them loses air overnight

    29+ Stache

  59. #3659
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    Quote Originally Posted by bataleon View Post
    When you re-tape your shitty Mulefuts and one of them loses air overnight

    I concur that mulefuts are stupid. Let's put a bunch more holes in a rim that is meant to be tubeless and airtight!

    That said I have had my standard mulefuts on my Stache for almost 2 years running now and see no need to replace them until I have to.

    The problem is the strip they put in is almost as wide as the internal width of the rim giving precious little area for the layer of tubeless tape to stick to. Now air and stans gets underneath that sticky strip and it won't keep sealed.

    What I did is to cut down the non adhesive rim strip width to just slightly larger than the width of the cut outs. This gave plenty of area for the sticky strip to adhere to. Haven't had a problem since.

    Now if I were to ever get a new rim or rims it would be without the stupid cutouts.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

    "When you seek revenge, be prepared to dig 2 graves"

  60. #3660
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    The trick to Mulefuts is Gorilla tape.

  61. #3661
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    I concur that mulefuts are stupid. Let's put a bunch more holes in a rim that is meant to be tubeless and airtight!

    That said I have had my standard mulefuts on my Stache for almost 2 years running now and see no need to replace them until I have to.

    The problem is the strip they put in is almost as wide as the internal width of the rim giving precious little area for the layer of tubeless tape to stick to. Now air and stans gets underneath that sticky strip and it won't keep sealed.

    What I did is to cut down the non adhesive rim strip width to just slightly larger than the width of the cut outs. This gave plenty of area for the sticky strip to adhere to. Haven't had a problem since.

    Now if I were to ever get a new rim or rims it would be without the stupid cutouts.
    I had to replace the Mulefuts on my '16 Stache 9 after replacing spoke...after spoke...after spoke.
    Would lose 1 or 2 a ride, every ride.
    Went with straight pull Durocs and haven't had an issue.
    No holes either.
    Mulefuts hang in the garage as spares.

  62. #3662
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    Hi
    Has anyone trying putting more standard width 29er wheels and tyres e.g. 2.3s on the carbon Stache to use a xc bike, I know Trek don't advise this , but just wondered if anyone has? i'm looking at the Kona Honzo also, but a Stache that i could switch wheels & tyres from 29+ to 29 as a 2 in 1 bike option appeals to me.
    Any thoughts?

  63. #3663
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    Quote Originally Posted by goffy View Post
    Hi
    Has anyone trying putting more standard width 29er wheels and tyres e.g. 2.3s on the carbon Stache to use a xc bike, I know Trek don't advise this , but just wondered if anyone has? i'm looking at the Kona Honzo also, but a Stache that i could switch wheels & tyres from 29+ to 29 as a 2 in 1 bike option appeals to me.
    Any thoughts?
    I put nobby nic 29 by 2.6 tires on my mulefut rims. Worked pretty well. I did it for a bikepacking race where I thought I needed lighter tires but I am over that now. But tinkering is fun and I get that part of it.

    Downside is that you will lose BB height so pedal strikes will go up.

    Trek used to say you could run 29 plus, regular 29 and 27.5 tires on their stache. Why did they change their minds?? I am sure it has nothing to do with anything other than the fact that when you design a frame around one wheel and tire size then it won't work so well with other sizes.

    I would say if you are going with a plus bike then keep plus size tires on it. If you want to run 27.5 plus tires then go with a 27.5 plus bike.

    Just watch out for bikes that are supposed to do it all. When 27.5 plus bikes came out many manufacturers just repurposed their 29er bikes into 27.5 plus bikes. With the trend towards lower BB's and more suspension travel many of them are pedal strike machines.

    The stache was designed around the 29 by 3.0 tires so I wouldn't stray too far from that. I put 3.25 inch tires on my Stache which raised the BB, but I like a higher BB plus how insane these tires are for traction, control and stability.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

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  64. #3664
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    Quote Originally Posted by josh8 View Post
    The trick to Mulefuts is Gorilla tape.
    I use gorilla tape and the wide non adhesive rim strip was the culprit in my case.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

    "When you seek revenge, be prepared to dig 2 graves"

  65. #3665
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    I put 3.25 inch tires on my Stache which raised the BB, but I like a higher BB plus how insane these tires are for traction, control and stability.
    What tires were these? thx

    Moving from 2016 alum to CF stache I have noticed more pedal strikes due to the 15mm bb drop.

  66. #3666
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug_ID View Post
    What tires were these? thx

    Moving from 2016 alum to CF stache I have noticed more pedal strikes due to the 15mm bb drop.
    3.25 duro crux available through Jones bicycles. Like em!

    I think if you scroll up you will see my bike with them front and rear.

    They are tall tires too so they raise your BB up.

    I don't quite get this low BB craze.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

    "When you seek revenge, be prepared to dig 2 graves"

  67. #3667
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    I like this bike. Was thinking to get 29+ wheels for fatty but ended up getting 2018 stache deal, no regrets. Having good time on local wood trails, even if its rainy winter with no snow.


    Sent from my SM-G955F using Tapatalk

  68. #3668
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    I put nobby nic 29 by 2.6 tires on my mulefut rims. Worked pretty well. I did it for a bikepacking race where I thought I needed lighter tires but I am over that now. But tinkering is fun and I get that part of it.

    Downside is that you will lose BB height so pedal strikes will go up.

    Trek used to say you could run 29 plus, regular 29 and 27.5 tires on their stache. Why did they change their minds?? I am sure it has nothing to do with anything other than the fact that when you design a frame around one wheel and tire size then it won't work so well with other sizes.

    I would say if you are going with a plus bike then keep plus size tires on it. If you want to run 27.5 plus tires then go with a 27.5 plus bike.

    Just watch out for bikes that are supposed to do it all. When 27.5 plus bikes came out many manufacturers just repurposed their 29er bikes into 27.5 plus bikes. With the trend towards lower BB's and more suspension travel many of them are pedal strike machines.

    The stache was designed around the 29 by 3.0 tires so I wouldn't stray too far from that. I put 3.25 inch tires on my Stache which raised the BB, but I like a higher BB plus how insane these tires are for traction, control and stability.
    The 2016 were able to run all 3 sizes. 27.5+ they wanted you o up the frok to 140mm travel,
    2017 Carbon was 29+ only, Alum was ok for the other sizes.
    2018 Only 29+ due to the geo now matching the carbon frames.
    Too Many .

  69. #3669
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    Quote Originally Posted by goffy View Post
    Hi
    Has anyone trying putting more standard width 29er wheels and tyres e.g. 2.3s on the carbon Stache to use a xc bike, I know Trek don't advise this , but just wondered if anyone has? i'm looking at the Kona Honzo also, but a Stache that i could switch wheels & tyres from 29+ to 29 as a 2 in 1 bike option appeals to me.
    Any thoughts?
    a 2.4" tire on the stock rims will have a odd profile.

    I know a few people runing 2.4" on normal 29er rims. like 26-30mm ID and love it
    Too Many .

  70. #3670
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barman1 View Post
    I had to replace the Mulefuts on my '16 Stache 9 after replacing spoke...after spoke...after spoke.
    Would lose 1 or 2 a ride, every ride.
    Went with straight pull Durocs and haven't had an issue.
    No holes either.
    Mulefuts hang in the garage as spares.
    That was the spoke's fault (all 28 of them), not the rim. At the one year mark, I relaced mine with DT Swiss Competition (2.0/1.8/2.0) spokes. No problems since. On the originals, I had one spoke break, so I replaced it. I then went around giving them all a 1/4 or so, and while I was sitting there admiring my handiwork, another spoke popped. All I was doing was looking at them. Ordered the new spokes that night.

  71. #3671
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    That was the spoke's fault (all 28 of them), not the rim. At the one year mark, I relaced mine with DT Swiss Competition (2.0/1.8/2.0) spokes. No problems since. On the originals, I had one spoke break, so I replaced it. I then went around giving them all a 1/4 or so, and while I was sitting there admiring my handiwork, another spoke popped. All I was doing was looking at them. Ordered the new spokes that night.
    IMO it's the side pull.
    The Durocs have straight pull.
    As soom as those side pull spoke start groaning, and they will, they'll start breaking.

  72. #3672
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    FWIW, I can't see any reason why a Stache shouldn't work fine with narrower 29" rims and tyres, for things like marathon racing perhaps. However, the BB will come down a little, probably a good thing for handling on non-technical terrain (with small pedals). If you spend lots of time ratcheting through technical stuff and/or use large platform pedals it could get old real fast though.

    Of course, Trek would rather folks bought a dedicated XC bike (or two). ;-)

  73. #3673
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    I concur that mulefuts are stupid. Let's put a bunch more holes in a rim that is meant to be tubeless and airtight!

    That said I have had my standard mulefuts on my Stache for almost 2 years running now and see no need to replace them until I have to.

    The problem is the strip they put in is almost as wide as the internal width of the rim giving precious little area for the layer of tubeless tape to stick to. Now air and stans gets underneath that sticky strip and it won't keep sealed.

    What I did is to cut down the non adhesive rim strip width to just slightly larger than the width of the cut outs. This gave plenty of area for the sticky strip to adhere to. Haven't had a problem since.

    Now if I were to ever get a new rim or rims it would be without the stupid cutouts.
    Thanks mate, yeah I did the same and trimmed mine slightly larger than the cutouts too.

    I think my issue was that I didn't go for I ride straight away, which isn't crucial obviously but it would've helped in getting the sealant into every little space around the bead area properly. Instead I gave the wheels a half-arsed shake n spin and left it at that.

    To the Mulefuts credit they are still running true after 2 years of pretty hard use, but man I wish the cutouts weren't there. My last tubeless setup lasted about 12 months before sealant managed to find it's way under the tape and out through the holes.

    This time I left a tube in overnight before removing and adding sealant, which I didn't do last time. Hopefully in doing so it'll get me longer than 12 months this time around.


    Quote Originally Posted by josh8 View Post
    The trick to Mulefuts is Gorilla tape.
    Yeah, I've been using the Gorilla clear. It's been good, there aren't any fibers like the regular Gorilla tape. It's still a huge mission to get the old adhesive residue off though so I just cleaned the rim as best I could with alcohol and put new tape over it...
    29+ Stache

  74. #3674
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    I'm not convinced straight pull spokes do anything except reduce your options for replacements, and increase their cost. Normal J-bend spokes work fine and often hold up for decades, provided that:

    1. You use decent quality spokes
    2. The heads fit well in the hub flanges, not usually a problem with decent hubs
    3. The builder does a good job (the most important factor)
    4. You don't crash heavily and write the wheel off

    Straight pull spokes and hubs have a bit of a "gee whiz" factor though, and I suspect may be easier and thus cheaper for machine lacing, plus there's lock-in for spares, all of which are better for manufacturers than riders. Note that I'm not saying they are worse, just that they're not necessarily any better or more reliable.

  75. #3675
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    [
    QUOTE=goffy;13486156]Hi
    Has anyone trying putting more standard width 29er wheels and tyres e.g. 2.3s on the carbon Stache to use a xc bike, I know Trek don't advise this , but just wondered if anyone has? i'm looking at the Kona Honzo also, but a Stache that i could switch wheels & tyres from 29+ to 29 as a 2 in 1 bike option appeals to me.
    Any thoughts?[/QUOTE]



    Quote Originally Posted by brent701 View Post
    a 2.4" tire on the stock rims will have a odd profile.

    I know a few people runing 2.4" on normal 29er rims. like 26-30mm ID and love it



    He wasn't suggesting a stock rim with narrow tire.




    I don't have a problem running 180mm crankset on the Stache with 29+ tires. I've seen others running 27.5+ on it as well. I don't see any reason whatsoever why you couldn't effectively run narrow wheelset/tires as a gravel/XC option for the Stache.

    The BB wouldn't be excessively low, and if you recall...this was how the Stache was originally marketed. "27.5+, 29er, &29+"

  76. #3676
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    [
    QUOTE=goffy;13486156]Hi
    Has anyone trying putting more standard width 29er wheels and tyres e.g. 2.3s on the carbon Stache to use a xc bike, I know Trek don't advise this , but just wondered if anyone has? i'm looking at the Kona Honzo also, but a Stache that i could switch wheels & tyres from 29+ to 29 as a 2 in 1 bike option appeals to me.
    Any thoughts?







    He wasn't suggesting a stock rim with narrow tire.




    I don't have a problem running 180mm crankset on the Stache with 29+ tires. I've seen others running 27.5+ on it as well. I don't see any reason whatsoever why you couldn't effectively run narrow wheelset/tires as a gravel/XC option for the Stache.

    The BB wouldn't be excessively low, and if you recall...this was how the Stache was originally marketed. "27.5+, 29er, &29+"[/QUOTE]

    2016 All 3 tire size
    2017 only alum for all 3 tire size
    2018 only 29+

    My buddy ran 2.2 on his Stache 9.8 and loved it. Didn't have BB problems. I'm not saying it can't be done, I just said what Trek says about doing it.

    I'd through some 30mm ID rims and some 2.4's and go ride the crap out of it.

    I ALMOST did it with my 2017 9.6 to replace my Procal 9.9. It can get down to the same weight if done right
    Too Many .

  77. #3677
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent701 View Post
    He wasn't suggesting a stock rim with narrow tire.




    I don't have a problem running 180mm crankset on the Stache with 29+ tires. I've seen others running 27.5+ on it as well. I don't see any reason whatsoever why you couldn't effectively run narrow wheelset/tires as a gravel/XC option for the Stache.

    The BB wouldn't be excessively low, and if you recall...this was how the Stache was originally marketed. "27.5+, 29er, &29+"
    2016 All 3 tire size
    2017 only alum for all 3 tire size
    2018 only 29+

    My buddy ran 2.2 on his Stache 9.8 and loved it. Didn't have BB problems. I'm not saying it can't be done, I just said what Trek says about doing it.

    I'd through some 30mm ID rims and some 2.4's and go ride the crap out of it.

    I ALMOST did it with my 2017 9.6 to replace my Procal 9.9. It can get down to the same weight if done right[/QUOTE]

    Thanks for the replies,
    I'm a little surprised no one on here has tried sticking on a normal xc width wheel & tyre combo to see how the Stache goes compared to the 29+ setup.
    A fore and against rundown from anyone able to do this would be great info.
    cheers

  78. #3678
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    Lets see your Stache official thread

    Got a tech question for the masses. Iím building up my 2017 Stache Carbon with Shimano 1x11. Iíve got a 11-40 cassette and the xt boost cranks with a 30T chainring up front. When I shift up the cassette, the chain rubs the underside of the chainstay on the 38T and 40T cogs. Also, the chain line of my crank lines up with the 9th cog oh my cassette. Should I have installed a non-boost crank? Any ideas?


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  79. #3679
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    Sounds like there's something badly wrong with the chainline. According to Shimano specs it should be either 50.4 for standard 1x or 53.4 for Boost - that's from the centre of the frame to the centre of the chainring teeth. With my stock Aeffect cranks it's ~53mm.

    There's an exploded crankset view available here:

    Manuals & Tech doc

    Which cog is it lining up with, the 15 or the 31? What BB are you using? There has to be something weird with the BB, BB spacers, crankarms and/or chainring.

  80. #3680
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    Quote Originally Posted by goffy View Post
    2016 All 3 tire size
    2017 only alum for all 3 tire size
    2018 only 29+

    My buddy ran 2.2 on his Stache 9.8 and loved it. Didn't have BB problems. I'm not saying it can't be done, I just said what Trek says about doing it.

    I'd through some 30mm ID rims and some 2.4's and go ride the crap out of it.

    I ALMOST did it with my 2017 9.6 to replace my Procal 9.9. It can get down to the same weight if done right
    Thanks for the replies,
    I'm a little surprised no one on here has tried sticking on a normal xc width wheel & tyre combo to see how the Stache goes compared to the 29+ setup.
    A fore and against rundown from anyone able to do this would be great info.
    cheers[/QUOTE]

    The differences would be very similar to riding a 29er hardtail with similar geometry and standard width 29er rims and tires.
    I ran 29 by 2.6 nobby nics on my 50 mm stock rims and now I have those tires on my ti 29er on 35 mm rims.
    Don't really notice any difference in the way the tire reacts but the geometry of the Stache is quite different and it is a much more stable capable trail bike. A lot has to do with the front fork and how the front end just doesn't deflect as much.

    Could you XC race with it with a 29er wheel and tire set? Sure and I expect it would do great only limited by the motor. Looks like the newer models are going to give you a lower BB which might be a consideration.
    I think my BB went down to around 12 inches unsagged with the old geometry (2016) with the 2.6 tires on it. It is 13.25 unsagged with my 3.25 duro crux tires on it.
    The newer models would probably have a super low BB height with race 29er tires on it. That would be my main concern.
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

    "When you seek revenge, be prepared to dig 2 graves"

  81. #3681
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    Had my stache out over the weekend enjoying the warm weather at Camrock in WI, since this thread is "let's see your stache"...

    This bike is just amazing year round! Plenty of float and grip in the snow with the stock chupa's, great traction over the icy rocks, and still light enough to go out for a solid ride. I've now had a few fat bikers stop and ask how I like it, I think it's just a great compromise bike that does summer and winter well.

    I also struggled with where to put my tools and backup tube since they won't work on the dropper post anymore. Velcro straps and a cheap bag for a bike light keep them up in my triangle now. No vibration, no rubbing on my knees, and on my XL frame I can still use water bottles

  82. #3682
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slowtalker View Post
    Got a tech question for the masses. Iím building up my 2017 Stache Carbon with Shimano 1x11. Iíve got a 11-40 cassette and the xt boost cranks with a 30T chainring up front. When I shift up the cassette, the chain rubs the underside of the chainstay on the 38T and 40T cogs. Also, the chain line of my crank lines up with the 9th cog oh my cassette. Should I have installed a non-boost crank? Any ideas?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I think that's your issue. I installed standard XT cranks. (180mm) m8000 11-40 cassette, chain, and RD.

    My line is great and no rubbing.

  83. #3683
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    Quote Originally Posted by chelboed View Post
    I think that's your issue. I installed standard XT cranks. (180mm) m8000 11-40 cassette, chain, and RD.

    My line is great and no rubbing.
    Same here.
    Been swapping cranks back and forth on the Stache 9 from my Highball and Superlight and no chainline issues.

  84. #3684
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    Lets see your Stache official thread

    Concerning my chain line issue, I called trek, and the tech said that frame is designed for boost, and that I had installed the correct crankset. After closer inspection of my cranks, I figured out that the crank wasnít properly seated on the drive side. A few hits with the mallet, and my chain line is much better. Iím still thinking about trying a non-boost crank to see how the narrower chain line matches up. Although Iím not getting any running, I donít like the angle of the chain in the low gears. I may join the choir singing the benefits of non-boost cranks with boost hubs.


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  85. #3685
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    FYI, here is what Wolftooth have to say about chainline: https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...and-chainrings

  86. #3686
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    FYI, here is what Wolftooth have to say about chainline: https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...and-chainrings
    Thanks for posting. Both the Shimano manual and the wolf tooth explanation are helpful. The only weird part is the recommendation from wolf to run boost cranks with plus tires. Seems like a lot of guys here are getting by without boost cranks. Probably depends on the tires.


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  87. #3687
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    ^ IMO what they're implying is that ISO clearance specs say 6mm minimum, so they can't recommend less than that without the chance of being sued if someone has a problem. Felt had something similar with their VR road bikes last year - 42mm between the stays meant they couldn't spec more than 30 mm tyres, but most of the tests I saw used 35mm. I also asked Salsa about crank clearance a while back and they said while M9000 cranks would clear their Cutthroat frame by 3mm they wouldn't officially say <5mm was okay.

    There are too many lawyers out there, so CYA for the worst case scenarios seems to be the rule these days. :-(

  88. #3688
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    I have a 2015 trek stache 15. Non plus. My frame is cracked and the warranty is offering me a credit. I like the idea of plus bikes and I have test road ones with similar geometry to my bike. I do alot of bikepacking and Trail riding. I would like to be able to use my current wheel set with my ikons for long distance rides but still use the plus tires for bike packing.. Is this bike the 2018 stache 7 a comparable bike to what I'm riding. Will I be happy with it? I know the rear hub will have to get changed out.

    Sent from my LG-H901 using Tapatalk

  89. #3689
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    Thanks for the replies,
    I'm a little surprised no one on here has tried sticking on a normal xc width wheel & tyre combo to see how the Stache goes compared to the 29+ setup.
    A fore and against rundown from anyone able to do this would be great info.
    cheers
    The differences would be very similar to riding a 29er hardtail with similar geometry and standard width 29er rims and tires.
    I ran 29 by 2.6 nobby nics on my 50 mm stock rims and now I have those tires on my ti 29er on 35 mm rims.
    Don't really notice any difference in the way the tire reacts but the geometry of the Stache is quite different and it is a much more stable capable trail bike. A lot has to do with the front fork and how the front end just doesn't deflect as much.

    Could you XC race with it with a 29er wheel and tire set? Sure and I expect it would do great only limited by the motor. Looks like the newer models are going to give you a lower BB which might be a consideration.
    I think my BB went down to around 12 inches unsagged with the old geometry (2016) with the 2.6 tires on it. It is 13.25 unsagged with my 3.25 duro crux tires on it.
    The newer models would probably have a super low BB height with race 29er tires on it. That would be my main concern.[/QUOTE]

    Friend did it with his 2017 9.8
    weighs 19 lbs ss and 20 lbs geared (XX1 eagle) and 2.2 tires

    He even dropped to a 100mm fork, had no problems.

    The Stache is a very capable bike with the right set up
    Too Many .

  90. #3690
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent701 View Post
    The differences would be very similar to riding a 29er hardtail with similar geometry and standard width 29er rims and tires.
    I ran 29 by 2.6 nobby nics on my 50 mm stock rims and now I have those tires on my ti 29er on 35 mm rims.
    Don't really notice any difference in the way the tire reacts but the geometry of the Stache is quite different and it is a much more stable capable trail bike. A lot has to do with the front fork and how the front end just doesn't deflect as much.

    Could you XC race with it with a 29er wheel and tire set? Sure and I expect it would do great only limited by the motor. Looks like the newer models are going to give you a lower BB which might be a consideration.
    I think my BB went down to around 12 inches unsagged with the old geometry (2016) with the 2.6 tires on it. It is 13.25 unsagged with my 3.25 duro crux tires on it.
    The newer models would probably have a super low BB height with race 29er tires on it. That would be my main concern.
    Friend did it with his 2017 9.8
    weighs 19 lbs ss and 20 lbs geared (XX1 eagle) and 2.2 tires

    He even dropped to a 100mm fork, had no problems.

    The Stache is a very capable bike with the right set up[/QUOTE]

    Actually the first part is not a quote from me but my answer did follow!

    What is his BB height?? Would think it would be pretty low but he is probably a more capable rider than me!
    "Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated"

    "When you seek revenge, be prepared to dig 2 graves"

  91. #3691
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    Friend did it with his 2017 9.8
    weighs 19 lbs ss and 20 lbs geared (XX1 eagle) and 2.2 tires

    He even dropped to a 100mm fork, had no problems.

    The Stache is a very capable bike with the right set up
    Actually the first part is not a quote from me but my answer did follow!

    What is his BB height?? Would think it would be pretty low but he is probably a more capable rider than me![/QUOTE]

    never measured it. He did do some trails with me that were rough and rocky and had no problems. not sure how "capable" rider you are.
    I almost did the conversion on mine and was going to sell my procal and use the stache for XC racing and weekend fun. But ended up racing SS instead ( not with a Stache)
    Too Many .

  92. #3692
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    Does anyone know the seat clamp size for a 2017 Stache 5? The stock Q/R clamp isn't marked, or the size listed in the bike specs, and I can't find my good calipers to measure it. :-(

    I'm getting sick of the seat slipping down and want to get rid of the Q/R. Thanks.

  93. #3693
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    Does anyone know the seat clamp size for a 2017 Stache 5? The stock Q/R clamp isn't marked, or the size listed in the bike specs, and I can't find my good calipers to measure it. :-(

    I'm getting sick of the seat slipping down and want to get rid of the Q/R. Thanks.
    I was literally doing the same thing last night, measuring the clamp, but Iím on a 2015 Stache 5.

    With calipers the frame seat tube was 36.7mm
    The QR was 36.3mm

    D
    Somewhere lost in the Bush!

  94. #3694
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    Thanks! Just had a look and it seems the clamp must be 36.4, about what my crappy plastic calipers read. Sadly, it's not a common size and not readily available here in Oz. I'll see if I can make a spacer to fit a machine screw and nut sit flat in the stock clamp, and order from overseas if that doesn't work..

  95. #3695
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    Quote Originally Posted by satanas View Post
    Does anyone know the seat clamp size for a 2017 Stache 5? The stock Q/R clamp isn't marked, or the size listed in the bike specs, and I can't find my good calipers to measure it. :-(

    I'm getting sick of the seat slipping down and want to get rid of the Q/R. Thanks.
    Does your clamp not have a 4 mm hex on the hinge side (inside the knob to finger tighten)?

    I had slipping issues too until I found it and torqued to 6 N-m. A little dab of fiber grip and proper torque cured it for me, and Iím 275 lbs.

  96. #3696
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    Thanks very much - I found the cunningly hidden 4mm socket and the bolt is now Very Tight Indeed! I've not seen one like that before.

    Before your post I ordered a Salsa Liplock in the right size, but it won't turn up for a while as it's not a stock colour at Jenson; at least it should look better once it arrives. I hate seat clamps that don't work; the bike before this had one too, and I'm ~140lbs, so IMHO they shouldn't slip. Decent sized bolts rule, tiny bolts and Q/Rs not so much...

  97. #3697
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    Quote Originally Posted by phalkon30 View Post
    Had my stache out over the weekend enjoying the warm weather at Camrock in WI, since this thread is "let's see your stache"...

    This bike is just amazing year round! Plenty of float and grip in the snow with the stock chupa's, great traction over the icy rocks, and still light enough to go out for a solid ride. I've now had a few fat bikers stop and ask how I like it, I think it's just a great compromise bike that does summer and winter well.

    I also struggled with where to put my tools and backup tube since they won't work on the dropper post anymore. Velcro straps and a cheap bag for a bike light keep them up in my triangle now. No vibration, no rubbing on my knees, and on my XL frame I can still use water bottles
    Hi
    Tomorrow is decision day for sizing on my new 9.8 Frame only.
    I see your on an XL, how tall are you please?

    I'm 6'1.5 so right on the edge of L and just into XL sizing. Can't find a ride in those sizes local to test so guess I'll have to take a punt.
    I was thinking maybe XL with a shorter stem might be good,
    SO ANY ADVISE FROM TALLER STACHE CARBON OWNERS BEFORE THE ORDER GOES IN TOMORROW WOULD BE HELPFUL, THANKS IN ADVANCE!

  98. #3698
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    I'm 6'4"with a 34" inseam. As for sizing.. I really don't know, I have always just gone for the biggest game I can get.

    This is a long bike, I would worry about it being a lot to handle if it's a little big. Maybe others can chime on, otherwise I think this has been discussed a few months ago in similar situations

  99. #3699
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    I'm 5'10 and ride an L (2016/17 geo, fitted with a 50mm stem). I'd go XL if I were you, it comes stock with a 50mm but you could always throw a 40mm on there if needed (which I don't think will be necessary).
    29+ Stache

  100. #3700
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    Quote Originally Posted by goffy View Post
    Hi
    Tomorrow is decision day for sizing on my new 9.8 Frame only.
    I see your on an XL, how tall are you please?

    I'm 6'1.5 so right on the edge of L and just into XL sizing. Can't find a ride in those sizes local to test so guess I'll have to take a punt.
    I was thinking maybe XL with a shorter stem might be good,
    SO ANY ADVISE FROM TALLER STACHE CARBON OWNERS BEFORE THE ORDER GOES IN TOMORROW WOULD BE HELPFUL, THANKS IN ADVANCE!
    I'd personally get a 21.5" at your size.
    I'm 5'11" long arms and 33" inseam. a 19.5" was just a tad too small, it worked but I could have used a 21.5 and been better fitted
    Too Many .

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