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  1. #1
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    I'm a newbie, and want to buy a Trek

    I ride for a few months. And now I want to buy a Trek bike - Elite 8.6 - a MTB hardtail.
    I'm 5' 6" (169~170cm), leg length is about 29" (75cm). I ride MTB size 15.5 feel small but size 17.5 is too large.

    How to choose the right size?

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the forums. In my opinion, it's all about YOU. Don't let anyone tell you what bike is the right size for you. If you are stuck between the two sizes with nothing in between, there are a few minor adjustments that can be made to the bike itself to make it more "fitting". If that route isn't for you, maybe that bike in general isn't the correct bike for you..? But like I said, do what feels good to you rather than go by a specific setup guide.

  3. #3
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Quote Originally Posted by namchip View Post
    I ride for a few months. And now I want to buy a Trek bike - Elite 8.6 - a MTB hardtail.
    I'm 5' 6" (169~170cm), leg length is about 29" (75cm). I ride MTB size 15.5 feel small but size 17.5 is too large.

    How to choose the right size?
    Visit your local bike shop and test out a few. That's the best answer you can get.

  4. #4
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    Even though bikes are 'sized' by seat tube length, it's most important to get the right length top tube. And with Trek bikes (and many others), you will find that Trek's entry level bikes have a considerably shorter top tube than a similarly sized bike from their mid-tier and top-tier level bikes. Although you can adjust things like stem length and fore/aft saddle position, once those get out of a middle range, those adjustments have effects that you may not like compared to just extending your seatpost out of the seat tube.

    For a person that is about your height, you will probably find most modern bikes will have stem lengths in the 70mm to 90mm range. Much longer or shorter than that, and you really should know what the net effect will be before committing. I would also try to avoid having to use a layback seatpost to get the saddle back far enough to get the cockpit at the right length. Better to get a bike with a longer top tube.

    Bottom line is that you will probably have the best shot at getting sized properly at you local bike shop. Try a few and see if you see some consistency in how they are sizing you. remember, that you should be comparing top tube lengths, and let the seat tube length be whatever it may be.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer View Post
    Visit your local bike shop and test out a few. That's the best answer you can get.

    I came, I saw and I " confused" (Julius Caesar) )

    thanks for all,
    authorized Trek retailer tell me that, if i'm between sizes, it's generally best to go with the smaller size. So, I've just bought a size 15.5 Trek bike with stem 120mm & seatpost 400mm
    that is correct?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by namchip View Post
    I came, I saw and I " confused" (Julius Caesar) )

    thanks for all,
    authorized Trek retailer tell me that, if i'm between sizes, it's generally best to go with the smaller size. So, I've just bought a size 15.5 Trek bike with stem 120mm & seatpost 400mm
    that is correct?
    The fact that they needed to use a 120mm stem AND a 400mm seatpost to get a bike to fit a rider that is 5 ft. 6.5" seems weird. Occurs to me that they could have you using a 350mm seatpost (what is considered a standard seatpost length), and a 90-100mm stem (also generally considered more of a normal stem length) on a 17.5 frame. Maybe they had their reasons, but it does seem odd just knowing what I know from reading it here. JMHO.
    Last edited by jeffj; 05-30-2013 at 07:12 AM. Reason: I had misspelled 'their' as 'there.'

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    The fact that they needed to use a 120mm stem AND a 400mm seatpost to get a bike to fit a rider that is 5 ft. 6.5" seems weird. Occurs to me that they could have you using a 350mm seatpost (what is considered a standard seatpost length), and a 90-100mm stem (also generally considered more of a normal stem length) on a 17.5 frame. Maybe they had there reasons, but it does seem odd just knowing what I know from reading it here. JMHO.
    Thank you so much! I will probably change to size 17.5 and smaller stem

  8. #8
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by namchip View Post
    Thank you so much! I will probably change to size 17.5 and smaller stem
    You'll get a much better handling bike doing this.

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