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  1. #1
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    How are you finding DRCV

    I posted this in another but thought it derseved its own.

    I just bought a Trek Remedy 9 and am loving most of it apart from just getting a few things dialled as I get used to the bike.

    I seem to be having trouble getting the front fork dialled in. It seems to tackle trail chatter very well and big hits likes jumps and drop offs well too. But when it comes to hitting medium sized rock gardens at speed, I feel like its not working right. It feels bouncy and deflective. Its like my arms are taking all the hits.

    I have a specialized fsr stumpjumper pro as well and I know over the same rock gardens the specialized fork just seems to level it all out and soak it up.

    So I am not sure if the fork just needs time to wear in or I have got the wrong settings, hmmmm.


    How are others finding there drcv shocks?

  2. #2
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    I have the DRCV fork on my Remedy 9.8 as well and have never really been able to ďtuneĒ it as well as I thought the shock should. I have the rebound a click or two slower than what Trek says it should be for my weight because that seemed to help. I feel that after all the messing around I have done that it is going to be as good as it is going to get. I have over 150 miles on it so it should be plenty broken in.

    Initially I couldnít get it dialed in at all but then realized that you have make sure that you screw in the pump another ľ turn and your gauge on your pump will increase another 10 psi or so. Then cycle the shock through 60% of its travel to equal out the pressure just like on the rear. Iím not sure why I didnít figure that out seeing as how they are both DRCV.

    @mtnbkaz seems to be pretty knowledgeable about the DRCV fork and shocks and says that basically it is the nature of the technology. DRCV problems
    drcv worth the trouble?
    searching his posts might be able to give you a bit more useful information than I have.

    Mark

  3. #3
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    Thanks Mark.

    After reading all those posts, I am beginning to wonder if DRCV is just a marketing tool?

    I bought this bike on the back of lots of glowing reviews. It was a toss up for me between the Remedy 9 and the Stumpy Evo. I am beginning to wonder how this bike would ride with normal 150mm shocks like every other bike manufacture still uses.

  4. #4
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    The pressure suggested in Trek's chart seems way high. To get full travel out of my DRCV Float I need to run about 60% to 70% of the recommended pressure. With pressure dropped it is much better feeling and more balanced.

    The rear shock seems about right at suggested pressure.

  5. #5
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    In another development with my shock, had noticed in the 2 months since I got the bike that there was a creaking sound coming from what I thought was the headset. When I was climbing and popped the wheel over a small root or rock it would make the sound or after I started my descent and then did some hard breaking then it would do it. So a forward and back rocking of the shock

    It has gotten worse and worse but was hard for me to replicate it in my garage so that I could take it to my lbs and have them look at it. I figured out a way to do it on some carpet to keep the wheel from sliding on the floor with the front brakes on. When I took it in to the shop the guy right away knew what it was. Not the headset, but the stanchions in the fork moving in the crown. I know itís got nothing to do with DRCV but it seems like there are lots of issues with the DRCV fork and rear shock other than the DRCV technology. He said the Fox warranty guy was going to be in a Tuesday and they would let me know if it was a warranty issue which I think it should be seeing as how the bike is only two months old.

    I agree with @OGWGFIWRT that running less pressure than recommended in the fork felt better.

    I had a Fox 32 F120 RLC with the Kashima coating on my previous bike that was way more tunable and even though it was 120mm of travel it was smoother with less stiction and would use all the travel and never felt like it bottomed out. Next year I think I will go with a Fox Talus 150 RLC.

    Mark

  6. #6
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    Yeah, I too am running about 25% less pressure in the fork than reccomended. It helps but still really doesn't feel like I think it should. I get a lot of brake dive and bouncing when out of the saddle too when running it at low pressure.

    Come to think of it, my arms and shoulders are sore and achey after each ride on the bike, and I know its becuase of the forks. I ride some really rough trails with lots of rock gardens.

    I never had a trek before, whats their warranty like? Do you think they would swap my fork over for a normal 150mm float RLC Kashima?

  7. #7
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    Bit of an update, I wrote to Trek Australia and asked them about the problem with the fork. It wasn't much help to me but I'll post there answer as it may be of help to some people with a new Trek with DRCV.

    Hi Andrew,

    Thanks for taking the time to get in contact with us!

    A really good tip that we have found works well is to just give you fork a few light compressions before a ride and always check air pressure before you go.

    This engages both chambers in a more controlled environment rather than riding along and hitting something big and causing a large compression and an uneven flow of air between the chambers.

    If this doesn't work I would head into your nearest Trek dealer and ask them to have a look at the fork and see if they can help diagnose the issue.

    I hope this helps your out and if you have any other questions please donít hesitate to send me another email.

    Cheers,
    Michael




    Tonight after work I dropped the pressures of both the fork and shock. I am 70kg (155lbs) and went 170psi on the rear and 70psi on the front.

    Bit of a quick ride down the local park with some stairs and 3 ft drop offs, it felt a lot better! On the drops the fork was close to bottoming, and the ring on the back shock was close to falling off the piston. Its strange to me to set up a bike like this where its so close to bottoming?

    I will have to test the new settings out on the trail on the weekend. My gut feeling is that it will nose dive more into corners and when on the brakes. But I want to see how it handles consecutive compressions through rock gardens. Hopefully its improved.

  8. #8
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    I have found that the DRCV shock on my 2011 R8 is more trouble than it is worth. I have had the bike about 4 months and every time I ride I have to mess with it. It bottoms all the time or it is to stiff. Personally I am looking at replacing it with a coil. The problem with that is that the shock measures at 7.75/ 2.25 which is a custom size. Thus far the only option is to put a smaller shock in that will slacken the bike and lower the BB. Oh and I am still debating if I should get it PUSHED or if that too will be just a waste of time and money.

  9. #9
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    Push does not work on DRCV shocks.

  10. #10
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    According to the website they do. have you checked it lately?

  11. #11
    Diggity Dog
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    Push will work on DRCV rear shocks but not DRCV forks just yet.

  12. #12
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    Oh wow I must be way out of date. I remember looking last year, and Darren said at that time they were not even considering doing DRCV. I am glad that changed!!

  13. #13
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    So what do pushed do? Its a shame you go to spend money a bike that should just work straight off the floor.

    So I took the bike out on the trails this morning with the new pressure settings, which are way off what trek reccomends on their website calculator.

    It felt better, I played with the rebound too, slowing down the rear and speeding up the front a bit. I achieved full travel only minutes into the ride hitting rock gardens at speed. I don't know if its just me but I thought using 150mm of full travel would feel plushhhhhhh! At leasts thats what I bought the bike for, to feel like I am coasting through the rough stuff. But I stil have to say, it felt rough. I have ridden smaller travel bikes that feel plusher? I am starting to wonder if DRCV is for me? It kinda feels like riding a cross country bike at some times.

    Don't get me wrong the bike has many positives, it the best bike Ive ever ridden for technical climbing, sure footed and stable. It eats up trail chatter, and loves to be in the air and feels great on landings. Its just the medium sized hits feel so damn rough, its such a shame.

    I need to ride my stumpjumper fsr again next week to compare the rides to make double sure. But I am starting to think I should have bought the EVO?

  14. #14
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  15. #15
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    Interested, I'm guessing you can't tune it for all situations? Can you tune it for one scenario but not the other?

  16. #16
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    Went out for another ride this morning and after doing some reading during the week on suspension, someone said if your suspension feels harsh try speeding up your rebound. So I tried speeding up my rebound quite significantly. Wow, what a difference! The bike is actually starting to track through the rock gardens and doesn't feel as harsh any more. I think I am close to getting it near spot on for me. Just a bit of fine tuning left to do.

    It took quite a few weeks of getting used to, but I am starting to love this bike now.

  17. #17
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    Does anyone do drops with the DRCV? I blew through my shock, and ended up bending the wheel (stans flow) into my deraileur (in 3rd gear) and took out 5 spokes b/c the DCRV won't handle drops. This was only a 4ft drop. I am a 190lbs with 230psi in it. I feel like I can't get enough air in the the shock. I want to replace it, damn trek has proprietary dimensions. Im calling PUSH in the morning to see what they can do. Otherwise I am opening the shock to remove the valve... if it can be done.

    BTW, it was a clean drop. I even stayed on the bike with all that happened.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsdnj View Post
    Does anyone do drops with the DRCV? I blew through my shock, and ended up bending the wheel (stans flow) into my deraileur (in 3rd gear) and took out 5 spokes b/c the DCRV won't handle drops. This was only a 4ft drop. I am a 190lbs with 230psi in it. I feel like I can't get enough air in the the shock. I want to replace it, damn trek has proprietary dimensions. Im calling PUSH in the morning to see what they can do. Otherwise I am opening the shock to remove the valve... if it can be done.

    BTW, it was a clean drop. I even stayed on the bike with all that happened.
    Do you really think a non drcv shock would have prevented a bent wheel

  19. #19
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    Yes i think it would have helped. Because when the shock bottoms out, all of the energy is instantly transfered to the wheels and frame of the bike. It becomes like doing a drop with a hardtail.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but the PE of being in the air has to go somewhere when landing and the rear shock should change the rate of the energy between the bike and the ground. When landing with a hardtail the transfer of energy is immediate. The transfer of energy would be slower, probably to a calculable rate, with a shock. I don't know if it would make a difference, but logically, the way I see it, it does.

    I am willing to listen to another point of view.

  20. #20
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    Come on. If you did a drop and blew out a wheel, doesn't matter what shock was on the bike, it would have done the same thing.

    -Tom

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsdnj View Post
    Yes i think it would have helped. Because when the shock bottoms out, all of the energy is instantly transfered to the wheels and frame of the bike. It becomes like doing a drop with a hardtail.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but the PE of being in the air has to go somewhere when landing and the rear shock should change the rate of the energy between the bike and the ground. When landing with a hardtail the transfer of energy is immediate. The transfer of energy would be slower, probably to a calculable rate, with a shock. I don't know if it would make a difference, but logically, the way I see it, it does.

    I am willing to listen to another point of view.
    What bike are you on? Remedy or Fuel?

    I would think it would have to be a pretty hard hit, going through all your travel should've taken some of the energy even if you bottomed it out. I'm guessing the hit must not have been perpendicular to the wheel, did you land off camber or on a rock that would have put a large lateral force on the wheel?

  22. #22
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    Just Blew my rear DRCV shock on my 2012 Rumblefish yesterday. Only 4 months of riding and I don't do big drops.I'm not a fan of this design. Give me a normal Float RP23.

    JP

  23. #23
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    on a Rumblefish 2. Clean landing.

  24. #24
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    Has anyone run a "normal" shock? Just curious how the suspension is with out a specially tuned shock.

  25. #25
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    I'm interested in this as well, keep the comments coming! I'm looking at picking up a 2012 Remedy 8, but am not really sure about the DRCV thing. I move away from a Fox Float RL because of stanchion and stiction issues, and ended up going with a heavier but buttery smooth RS Sektor Coil.

    I like the R8, but would rather have a Revelation 150 on the front than the DRCV thing. From what I hear so far, it seems like it's more trouble than it's worth.
    "Got everything you need?"

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