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  1. #1
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    help with lightening the load on my 4300

    I want to upgrade and lighten my Trek 4300. I own the XL frame and stock it weighs about 33 pounds. Its a beast baby! Can I shed 7-8 pounds on this bike and what is the best way to do this? Thanks for any suggestions.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmundt
    I want to upgrade and lighten my Trek 4300. I own the XL frame and stock it weighs about 33 pounds. Its a beast baby! Can I shed 7-8 pounds on this bike and what is the best way to do this? Thanks for any suggestions.
    Wow. It's gonna cost you a lot to shed anywhere near 7-8 pounds. You'll save money by just buying a complete, but lighter bike.

    Wheels - $250 - $500
    Fork - $300 - $600
    Crankset - $200 - $300
    cassette - $70
    brakes?
    stem?
    seatpost?

    It'll cost you $800 minimum and you still won't save 7-8 pounds.

    The 4300 is a base model. Sell it and buy a new, lighter bike. It's be cheaper and quicker.

  3. #3
    Mantis, Paramount, Campy
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    Ok, I'm Lazy But....

    I didn't go look over the stock components so some of this may not apply but here's my take.

    1) Tires, stock tires are usually junk. A nice kevlar bead pair can be had for pretty cheap and you can save more than a pound of rotating weight.
    2) Wheels. Get a set built by a local wheelbuilder. Don't get cookie cutter wheels. Handbuilt are cheaper and can be much lighter depending on the build. Probably shed a mimimum of a pound and perhaps 2-3 depending on the stock wheels.
    3)Stem, bars, seatpost, saddle. These are all good places to save weight. Again, stock components are usually bretty beefy. Lightweight bars and seatposts are cheap. If you swap all of that out you can probably save another 2 pounds depending on saddle choice.

    I'd say it would take about $400 to get close to dropping the weight you propose.

    A different bike might be the way to go.
    *** --- *** --- ***

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the reply guys. I have been looking at new bikes, but thought it may be cheaper to "put mine on a diet." Alpha base model frames must be pretty heavy.

    What weight should I expect for a new, lightweight bike (hardtail or full-suspension), that wont break the bank?

  5. #5
    PVNEMBA vee pee
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    My wife has a 4300 and it's OK for a beginner bike, but as others will note, it will take a lot of $$$ to get it down in the weight range you're looking for. Tires, pedals, and fork might be the best places to start saving weight if you decide to stick with it.

    We can give you a ton of recommendations on a new bike, but we need to know what "won't break the bank". For some it's $2000, others $1000, for others it's $600. Give us an idea of what you are willing to spend and we'll give you some suggestions for a great bike in that range.

    If you want to stick with Trek, the 8000 is a great hardtail that can be had for $1300-1400 or less once shops start getting more of the '07 models.

    - Chris

  6. #6
    What It Be ?
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    I had an old 6500 with the Alpha Aluimum frame. What I did was crack my bottom bracket and it stripped the threads. Got me an 8500 frame for 500 built with all my stuff swapped over. SOOOOOOO Much Light

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