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  1. #1
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    Fuel EX8 Suspension Bearing Maintenance

    After 9 months with my new EX8 I decided I would pull the back end apart and take a look at the suspension bearings. Pretty easy to disassemble by the way. To my surprise the bearings were completely depleted of grease and probably would have lasted another month at the most without lubrication. They were a piece of cake to lube up but I was just surprised that were completely dry. I usually do all my lubes on an annual basis depending how much I ride but would recommend to all you EX owners to take a look at the bearings and save yourself alot of extra work.

    Bob
    Fortune sides with him who dares. Vergil

  2. #2
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    Can you give us step-by-step instructions on how to do this? Perhaps make it an instructable?

    Thanks

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by YeahWhatever
    Can you give us step-by-step instructions on how to do this? Perhaps make it an instructable?

    Thanks
    I tell you how I did it.

    1. Put the bike on a stand or just flip it over (Which is what I did)
    2. Let the air out of your shock (I would let out the air before flipping it over)
    3. Pull the cranks off and the rear wheel.
    4. Pull the front derailluer. It would be easier to pull both off and the chain but I just did the front because you don't have a choice.
    5. Break loose all connecting points for the suspension then disassemble. Note where the small spacers go on the EVO Link connection points.
    6. Once you have it all apart clean everything up and wipe it down.
    7. Each bearing has a small dust cap that can be easily popped off with an exacto knife, I would do one at a time as to not mix them up because they are different sizes.
    8. Mine had alot of crap in them so I cleaned them out with brake cleaner then let each one dry out before applying new grease. Pack each one with grease then pop on the dust cap. I used Philwood waterproof grease.
    9. Once they are all greased up and put back together assemble everything loosly but don't tighten anything down yet. Make sure and install the shock before you tighten down the main swingarm bolt or it won't go into place.
    10. Once all the bolts are in place and the shock is installed torque everything to specs noted on each attach bolt.
    11. Reassemble everything else and air up the shock..
    12. I recommend using locktite on all the bolts to prevent that trailside disaster.

    It's really a piece of cake, I don't think I have forgot anything.

    Bob
    Last edited by nick59349; 09-28-2008 at 04:46 PM.
    Fortune sides with him who dares. Vergil

  4. #4
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    After the nine months of riding, how many miles was that? I'm just trying to get an idea of how many miles you have. I may only ride 15-20 miles a week on my EX8 so the bushings might be fine for a year if you are riding 50-75 miles a week.

    Thanks,
    Ed

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FastZR1
    After the nine months of riding, how many miles was that? I'm just trying to get an idea of how many miles you have. I may only ride 15-20 miles a week on my EX8 so the bushings might be fine for a year if you are riding 50-75 miles a week.

    Thanks,
    Ed
    I ride about 20 to 30 miles a week average. I do live in Washington though and it is muddy quite a bit of the time. It's really easy to check though without taking everything apart. Just pull one of the bolts off one side of the aft EVO link and pop off the dust cap, 2 minutes tops, that way you know for sure if it needs to be done.

    Bob
    Fortune sides with him who dares. Vergil

  6. #6
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    After a little research I discovered that the bearings are not lubed when assembled but come direct from the vendor pre-assembled, lubed of course but not with high quality grease. So I would highly recommend checking out your bearings. If you have ALOT of extra money you can upgrade to these, then you don't need any lube!

    http://www.bocabearings.com/main1.aspx?p=docs&id=7

    Fortune sides with him who dares. Vergil

  7. #7
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    Thanks Nick. Did you notice a big differnce in the feel of the bike after lubricating the bearings?

  8. #8
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    I'd say that it may not have been that the grease got depleted, but more likely the bearings didn't come packed properly with grease to start. This is a comon problem with bearings and I always will check new bearings to make sure they are packed properly, especially in suspension points that will see loads of dust, grime and water.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  9. #9
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    I haven't had a chance to ride it since I lubed it but hopefully will sometime this week. I would imagine it will ride a little smoother.

    I tend to agree with LyNx about the bearings, I just can't see how they possibly be dry after that short of time period and being sealed up as well as they are.
    Fortune sides with him who dares. Vergil

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    It's an old thread, but I think it's a good one to bump back up.

    Bought my EX8 new in Oct 08, put 567 miles in 7 months. I checked the bearings last night and this is what I found. Evo bearings were almost dry, but were still working. Regreased (right over old grease) and not really an issue. The lower pivot bearings were completely dry and the non-drive side bearing was froze, I could not spin it with my finger, after using some creeping oil I finally broke it loose and worked it for a long time with my fingers. Cleaned out both lower pivot bearings with brake fluid and let dry. Repacked with finish line teflon grease and reassembled. Used loctite on threads and torqued to spec on bolt.

    Easy job with the only exception being that I didn't put shock in place prior to torquing (mistake), had to loosen everything and then reinstall shock. Make sure you have the shock installed and then torque up everything together.

    Anyone ever pull apart the APB to check those bearings?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasiorv
    Anyone ever pull apart the APB to check those bearings?
    Yep, piece of cake. Just remove the caps with a crescent wrench and you'll have access to the bearings.

    Nick
    Fortune sides with him who dares. Vergil

  12. #12
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    I find that the lower shock pivot on my EX8 is very tight even with the bolt taken out. The full floater chain stays are actually pinching the bottom shock spacers very tightly. To uninstall/install the rear shock I have to loosen the main pivot bolts to "unpinch" the shock spacers. Is this how it is on your EX8s also?

  13. #13
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    From the owner's manual:

    Lubricating the Fuel EX

    No lubrication is required for the shock or the pivot of your Trek rear suspension bicycle. Avoid all lubricants as they may damage the cartridge or composite bearings. For best results and long life, simply wash the shock and pivot area with a solution of soap and water, or just water.


  14. #14
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    I find that the lower shock pivot on my EX8 is very tight even with the bolt taken out. The full floater chain stays are actually pinching the bottom shock spacers very tightly. To uninstall/install the rear shock I have to loosen the main pivot bolts to "unpinch" the shock spacers. Is this how it is on your EX8s also?

    Yes, this is how it is on my bike as well. I put it back together the same way, based on the design (being "pinched" between two bars without bearings or a spreader bar) I believe this is correct

    Gained access to the ABP bearings last night and they were actually in pretty good shape, I added some additional grease and put back together.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by lexvil
    From the owner's manual:

    Lubricating the Fuel EX

    No lubrication is required for the shock or the pivot of your Trek rear suspension bicycle. Avoid all lubricants as they may damage the cartridge or composite bearings. For best results and long life, simply wash the shock and pivot area with a solution of soap and water, or just water.

    That's how they sell new parts......
    Fortune sides with him who dares. Vergil

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick59349
    That's how they sell new parts......
    You have a point. I'm checking mine.

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