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  1. #1
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    First Pics of 2014 Trek Superfly AL

    Current bikes:

    2014 Framed Minnesota 2.0 Fatbike
    2012 Trek Superfly 100 AL Pro
    2011 Specialized Rockhopper

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    How are there no replies to this yet? Would love to see more on this. With Salsa and the Ibis Ripley now validating the 51mm offset fork that Fisher/Trek has been doing for years, I am starting to lend more weight to it. Not everyone needs carbon and this looks like a killer alum bike. Hope that revised geo reigns in the top tube lengths and the chainstays a lil more. Bridgeless upper and bottom yokes looks great. I think I saw a 27.2 mm post which should be the standard for a hardtail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by urbiksux View Post
    How are there no replies to this yet? Would love to see more on this. With Salsa and the Ibis Ripley now validating the 51mm offset fork that Fisher/Trek has been doing for years, I am starting to lend more weight to it. Not everyone needs carbon and this looks like a killer alum bike. Hope that revised geo reigns in the top tube lengths and the chainstays a lil more. Bridgeless upper and bottom yokes looks great. I think I saw a 27.2 mm post which should be the standard for a hardtail.
    I have always had a preference for a range-y top tube and that's one of the reasons I settled on Fishers/Treks. One of the things I do not like about the new Superfly/FuelEX/etc. (I own a 2013 Superfly SL) is that they shortened up the cockpit.

  4. #4
    Zaf
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    Those new lines are quite nice across the top tube into the seatstays.
    Gary Fisher branding only on the seat tube now.

  5. #5
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    Sweet, looks good so far. I've got a 2013 Superfly AL Elite and its been great. Wouldnt mind the thru-axle rear, but im not crazy about internal cable routing.... Everything else looks good.

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    any of you Superfly owners have strong opinions on the 51mm offset fork handling? I have read all about it, but haven't ridden it.

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    Why cables under the bottom bracket?

    Quote Originally Posted by shenny88 View Post
    Sweet, looks good so far. I've got a 2013 Superfly AL Elite and its been great. Wouldnt mind the thru-axle rear, but im not crazy about internal cable routing.... Everything else looks good.
    I simply cannot understand the reason to route any cables below the bottom bracket which is probably one of the most vulnerable areas of a bike. I often hit stones/branches/ etc. with the bottom of my bike. I'm curious if any of you had damage to the brake hose down there?

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    Quote Originally Posted by urbiksux View Post
    any of you Superfly owners have strong opinions on the 51mm offset fork handling? I have read all about it, but haven't ridden it.
    The difference is subtle, it isn't one of those things you jump on the bike and notice right away. Rather, after going back and forth between a bike that has it and one that doesn't you get a sense of what it does. No matter which way a persons strong opinion leans, it's a subtle enough change that it shouldn't be something that turns you off to Trek.

    Personally, I like it (mostly). Riding a SF100SL that has a head angle that is right on the verge of being too slack for my XC/Endurance riding, I like even a full degree steeper. With the head angle and bit of extra wheelbase it bombs descents and sketch stuff better than you would think, it also -- somehow, it almost seems like magic for how it rides downhill, carves a really great turn around switchbacks or in tight trail. I like all that stuff, my only small gripe is that it likes to wander just a little bit on the climbs. That seems like a reasonable price to pay for a bike that turns as well as the full degree steeper HA bike I had prior and descends much better.

    I think it's the real deal, it's an improvement -- you can read a review like the one I just wrote and make a big deal out of it, but like I said before... it isn't. It is a small difference that you only really notice over time and miles

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    MTB

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    Quote Originally Posted by tamasd View Post
    I simply cannot understand the reason to route any cables below the bottom bracket which is probably one of the most vulnerable areas of a bike. I often hit stones/branches/ etc. with the bottom of my bike. I'm curious if any of you had damage to the brake hose down there?
    Most Specialized bikes have their cables routed under the BB. When I was researching for my first full suspension ~3yr ago and the Epic was on my short list I did a lot of prodding of mechanics and riders and a lot of forum reading on the topic of cable routing. My take-away was that it shouldn't be a concern. Pinching a shift cable and losing your rear der., or having a very hard to shift rear der. can happen but it is a very rare event. Brake hoses shouldn't be an issue -- besides, it's the rear brake anyway, you don't need that!

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    I understand that they can get away with it BUT does it allow any advantage? Until this year most hardtails had their cables routed along the toptube. Why bother with changing it? IF they want they can do internal cable routing in the toptube also, that does not warrant this trade-off.
    IMHO a punctured hydraulic brake hose IS an issue (more so, if you discover it before a hard turn)

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    Quote Originally Posted by tamasd View Post
    I understand that they can get away with it BUT does it allow any advantage? Until this year most hardtails had their cables routed along the toptube. Why bother with changing it? IF they want they can do internal cable routing in the toptube also, that does not warrant this trade-off.
    IMHO a punctured hydraulic brake hose IS an issue (more so, if you discover it before a hard turn)
    I won't comment on the supposed/perceived advantages, cable routing seems to be pretty subjective. I think you are going to have a pretty hard time puncturing a brake hose though. They are flexible in compression but not in expansion, the PVC coating on them is going to be slippery in the face of rocks/other obstacles and tend to slide over them rather than pinching. Also, the braided stainless steel structure of the hose is highly resilient to puncturing or cutting -- unless you happen to regularly ride your bike over the top of high-speed cutoff wheels I wouldn't expect an issue.

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    It looks Sweet (and I have to be the Biggest TREK fan over the last 4 years)---

    but the rear (chainstays and seatstays) look a little thinner than on my 2012 Superfly AL Elite.. And anyone (like myself who had a Paragon crack in the rear end)--then got a new Superfly definitely felt better about the 'beefy' stays in the rear (compare to the Paragons..)

    I had read over the last 4-5 years about Gary Fishers being a little to thin in those areas which lead to the frame cracking. Mine (and everyone I know who had a Paragon had a frame crack at that same place..)

    --I just like the 'beefier' All mountain type of look when I got my 2012 Superfly.. Maybe I just can't tell how thick that spot is with that pick (it could be the same width as mine)---but know 'pound-for-pound' the Aluminum Superfly Hardtail is the best deal out there (for a high-end aluminum hardtail price wise)----

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    I ran a Specialized Stumpy with the cables under the down tube and also a Knolly Delerium-T with a similar setup for several years. Never had an issue. If something that big is going to hit the bottom of your bottom bracket it has somehow either gotten past the chainrings or already damaged them beyond use. Worrying about a punctured hydraulic hose from this cable routing is pretty pointless. I'm willing to bet the chances of snagging the hose in front of your handlebars and destroying it in a crash are higher. Or even higher the chances of hitting a cable on the top tube when you lay the bike down in a rock pile.

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    Late to the party here, but I just wanted anyone who was looking at a Superfly to disregard this review by Bike Magazine:
    2014 Bible of Bike Tests Roundtable Reels: Trek Superfly 8 | Bike Magazine

    The reviewers overstate how the bike -- and, by implication, ALL aluminum hardtails -- isn't suited for rocky, steepish terrain. It's ridiculous. If you have shoddy riding skills, I guess you would require a 5"+ travel bike to get around Sedona... That place is great for hardtails, unless you're dropping down into a canyon on a fall line...

    I'm saying this: AL hardtails -- and the last few years of the Superfly esp. -- are fine for rocky, rooty, steep stuff. You won't win a Super-D or Enduro race on one, but they are light, responsive and a blast to ride, if you just love riding.

  16. #16
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    I'm going back and forth between the Superfly 8 and the Cannondale F29 4. I have ridden the F29 and liked it. The Lefty felt great and I noticed the SAVE stays actually worked to smooth out the ride. How does the new aluminum Superfly feel with the claimed increase in vertical compliance? I like the looks of the Superfly much more than the F29 and the price works a little better for me also.
    Any info on how smooth the ride of the new Superfly frame is would be much appreciated!

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