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  1. #1
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    Fairwell to Trek

    I have made a decision to move on from Trek bikes for good. If you are a loyal Trekie or a person who conforms to whatever the majority in the secret bike society is saying, you may not want to read further.

    Perhaps Trek just isn’t meant to be in the singlespeed market. And I’m not here to tell you that Trek’s sliding dropout design is the worst on the market - even though it may very well be. Heck, maybe the geniuses funded by Trek’s large R&E program haven’t “figured it out yet” like some of the manufacturers less than one hundredth their size. I don't know... that is all speculation. What I do know is that I have moved on.

    I haven’t looked at the 2013’s close enough yet (nor do I care) but the 2011-2012 Marlins and Rigs have a major flaw. I know you’ve all heard the “rumors”. The person that wrote this post (see link) did an excellent job at portraying it: Trek Rig rear wheel falling out: diagnosis and solution

    Anyone who thinks this is just a rumor (like a few shops and bike gurus told me) has their blinders on or has not looked at this in-person with an open mind with someone who is willing to show them step-by-step. Bike companies make bad designs and parts that have flaws... that's just part of the manufacturing process. Though it isn’t supposed to happen with QC processes today, occasionally these faulty products are released and sold to the general public. Again, this happens but a company has the professional and moral responsibility to step up to the plate and rectify the situation. I know that Trek has gone above and beyond to service people on varying issues, I am not here to dispute that. However, the fact that Trek did not address the root of this particular problem and man-up to protect the faithful buyers who purchased these bikes from them is just plain inexcusable and borderline criminal. I'm not talking about the hardware either – you can keep those fancy stainless screws that “fix” the problem - I'm talking about the dropout clearance below the frame not being deep enough. Again, see the post on the link I provided above if you want details and pictures. There should have been recalls on the dropouts and Trek should have tracked down their registered customers to see that their bikes were made safe. Instead, Trek hid under a rock and played a game of smoke and mirrors with not only their faithful customers, but with their local dealers. For it to come to the point where my local dealer has to file down the head of my skewer as the fix to this problem is a joke, but that’s what they had to do since Trek was too busy trying to shave 5 grams off their next carbon bike.

    The Rig was my 3rd Trek bike, and after a couple crashes stemming from this issue and Trek's lack of competence, initiative and customer service, I made a decision to move away from Trek for good. It will always leave a bitter taste in my mouth. My bike shop tried to support me during the ordeal, however, they were tied to Trek's policies. I bought a frame from a competitor and swapped all of the parts over to it.

    I emailed Trek to tell them that as a previously loyal customer I felt betrayed during this whole ordeal and that myself/my family would not buy from them again. My e-mail was polite and explained the actual issue. I probably do not need to tell you that Trek didn’t respond to this e-mail. For those of you who made it this far, thanks for reading. I wish all of you the best with the Trek bikes you currently own and may purchase in the future. I know a lot of people who love Trek and their bikes. It was just time for me to move on so that I could personally return to the joy of mountain biking that originally got me into it.

  2. #2
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    my stomach got queasy. i have, to my count 7 bikes under my name which includes my family and friends... hopefully i don't suffer your fate, but getting a Trek bike was just an option that was convenient for me. darn that Trek card...

    guess id have to be more vigilant as to what comes up with all these bikes...
    2014 TREK FARLEY
    2013 TREK RUMBLEFISH PRO
    2012 TREK SUPERFLY AL ELITE

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bapski View Post
    my stomach got queasy. i have, to my count 7 bikes under my name which includes my family and friends... hopefully i don't suffer your fate, but getting a Trek bike was just an option that was convenient for me. darn that Trek card...

    guess id have to be more vigilant as to what comes up with all these bikes...
    Honestly, there's a 99% you will probably be fine with your bikes unless it's one of their singlespeeds. If it is one of the singlespeeds (Rig or Marlin), I would just pay some close attention and educate yourself on the dropouts. Make sure you can see a little daylight above the head of the skewer on each side. It should not be touching the frame; if it is, the frame may be obstructing it from dropping up all the way. I felt I needed to voice this, but it's all in the past now, I just swapped everything to my new frame last night and moved on. A few of the guys I ride with ride Treks.

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