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  1. #1
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    drcv worth the trouble?

    I got a 2011 ex7 and of course they change the rear shock the next year, on the site they are pushing the drcv rear shock hard, is it worth the upgrade?

  2. #2
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    Yes it is! I have a 2011 with the drcv rear and love it, bottomless feel when u need it and Xcode feel when in smaller bumps. Now I'm drooling over the drcv forks on the 2012's.

  3. #3
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    The DRVC shock and fork are really good. Good wIth small bumps and big hits. Love the fact I could comfortable ride over dirt tracks with dried out 4x4 tire tracks and do a 2 foot jump right after. The rippling effect from the uneven tire tracks use to bothers me, DRVC suspension smoother it out slightly.

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    I'm going to say "no"

    I recently picked up a 2012 EX9 - first experience with DRCV. I'm not impressed, but I will add the caveat that I like to run my suspension pretty plush.

    The DRCV fork is great but to be honest I don't think it works any better than a non-DRCV fork that is tuned properly and has fresh seals & damper oil. (I say that because people always compare their old worn suspension to a new model - of course the new one feels better than your tired old kit.)

    But I really don't like the DRCV rear. I also have a 2008 Remedy 9 - back when the Remedy came with a Fox 36. With a shimmed HV or LV air can (or the DHX5 that I was running for awhile), I run the Remedy at ~30% sag, which I think is a good match for the 36 fork (which I find plusher than the 32-series forks). If I run 30% sag on the DRCV shock, it blows through the travel really quickly once the DRCV chamber opens. In order to not blow through the travel in the bottom 50% "DRCV open" part of the travel, I have to run the shock at a much higher PSI, which results in a harsher ride for the top 50% "DRCV closed" travel.

    Now many people like that "more efficient" pedaling and stiffer top end. I think that's the reason that many like DRCV. It feels like an efficient XC pedaler, but opens up on bigger hits and doesn't feel harsh. But for me, I ride a lot of rocky terrain and prefer a slightly plusher initial feel feel to soak up the choppy terrain, at the expense of less efficient pedalling on smoother terrain.

    So at the end of the day, I'll say that I think the DRCV shocks fit some riding styles well, but don't fit all riding styles. Don't get me wrong, it doesn't make riding suck or anything - and it makes a greater difference between my Scratch-like Remedy (DH bar/stem, Hadley/823 wheels, etc., 2.5 tires). But I really would prefer a slightly plusher feel on the EX also.

  5. #5
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    My area tends to be pretty rocky (Northern Cali) and the DRCV is sweet for soaking up the small and large stuff...

    Mtnbkaz makes a very solid point about worn shocks vs new DRCVs so it may be worth borrowing a demo Trek 2012 EX 5 and EX 8 so you can feel the difference (EX5s have reg shocks, EX8 are DRCV front and rear)

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoingOffRoading View Post
    My area tends to be pretty rocky (Northern Cali) and the DRCV is sweet for soaking up the small and large stuff...
    DRCV can't "soak up" small and large stuff with the same tune - unless your definition of soak up is significantly different from mine - which was my point that DRCV is a good match for some riding styles/preferences but not for others.

    Think about it - no matter what pressure you're running, the volume of DRCV increases at 50% travel. So the spring rate will always be lower for the 2nd half of the shock stroke than the 1st half of the stroke. So if you set it up for a plush initial feel (what I would consider to "soak up" the rocks), once you hit 50% travel the shock rate drops and you will blow through the rest of your travel.

    If you increase the pressure so that you don't bottom out on bigger hits, by definition the first half of the travel will be harsher than a non-DRCV shock. Now from an individual rider's perspective, it may still be plush enough for your needs, but it is impossible for the first half of the travel of a DRCV shock to be as plush as the bottom half.

    I think DRCV works best for people who predominantly like a XC feel (for lack of a better term) with efficient pedaling but with the higher volume bottom end to soak up bigger bumps. If you prefer a plusher ride, you'll probably not be happy with DRCV.

    What would be interesting is seeing if Push can optimize this system for a better balance. I might look into that once my shock needs an overhaul.

  7. #7
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    I agree with mtnbkaz. I just got a 2012 Rumblefish with DRCV fork and shock. I set it up
    with 30% sag rear and 25% front. In normal riding conditions it works amazingly well but
    when you try to ride more aggressively (steep rollers, small drops or fast and rocky) the
    fork just blows through it's travel and bottoms hard. I don't notice the bottoming on the rear as much.

    Bumped up the fork pressure to 15% sag and the fork is harsh and STILL BOTTOMS sometimes.

    Called up Fox and the tech said "yup that's the way Trek designed it"
    He did tell me that I could put a regular Float air cartridge in there and throw the DRCV in the trash.

    I think I will go back to the 25% sag and see if I can get use to the different feel. If not I will deffinetly be swapping for a Float cartridge in.

    Maybe Trek designed the DRCV for riders where the trails are less steep and rocky?

    JP

  8. #8
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    Interesting discussion. I'm no engineer, but here's my amateur take. The volume does increase when the shock gets through 50% of its travel, but the pressure in the second chamber is going to be significantly higher. This is where Fox's engineers came in. I'm sure they did some math (to determine air chamber size, etc) to insure that the at 55% of shock stroke, the rate isn't significantly higher or lower than 45% of shock stroke. That was their objective anyway.... if the functional size of the air chamber changes, at the right moment, the whole shock will feel more linear and less progressive (than a single air chamber shock).

    If you are doing a bunch of jumping and big drops (6 foot plus? I mean real feet, not mtbr feet) then maybe you want more progressive feel.

  9. #9
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    I also agree with mtnbkaz. I have a 2010 Remedy (first year with DRCV rear) and find that in order to have a nice, plush ride on rougher terrain, I have to run more like 30% sag but I find that at the end of rides, my O-ring has slipped off the bottom of the shock. I don't feel harsh bottom outs but it would seem clear that I'm using all of my travel.

    I've been riding this bike for two full seasons now and love it but am always curious how it would compare to a non-DRCV set up.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    Interesting discussion. I'm no engineer, but here's my amateur take. The volume does increase when the shock gets through 50% of its travel, but the pressure in the second chamber is going to be significantly higher. This is where Fox's engineers came in. I'm sure they did some math (to determine air chamber size, etc) to insure that the at 55% of shock stroke, the rate isn't significantly higher or lower than 45% of shock stroke. That was their objective anyway.... if the functional size of the air chamber changes, at the right moment, the whole shock will feel more linear and less progressive (than a single air chamber shock).

    If you are doing a bunch of jumping and big drops (6 foot plus? I mean real feet, not mtbr feet) then maybe you want more progressive feel.
    I am bottoming the fork on 3-4 foot drops(real feet) and I'm bottoming HARD. Also on steep rollers I'm hitting bottom. Trust me this fork bottoms WAY too easy at 25% sag. Bump it up to 15% and it bottoms a little less but it's way too harsh on everything else.
    This fork has ZERO Progression. It is a great fork for XC rides though when you start pushing harder that's when the lack of any progression shows. I really wish there was a way to add a little bottom out progression. The concept is good but I believe the execution is a little flawed.

    JP

  11. #11
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    I have a 2011 Rumblefish One. I have had the DRCV rear shock replaced (on warranty) once already and just took my bike back to the LBS because the shock propedal stopped working. The LBS says, the shock will likely go back to Fox.

    I like the feel of DRCV when it's working, but I have not had good luck with it's reliability.
    fesch
    Riding in snow is for the desperate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    Interesting discussion. I'm no engineer, but here's my amateur take. The volume does increase when the shock gets through 50% of its travel, but the pressure in the second chamber is going to be significantly higher. This is where Fox's engineers came in. I'm sure they did some math (to determine air chamber size, etc) to insure that the at 55% of shock stroke, the rate isn't significantly higher or lower than 45% of shock stroke. That was their objective anyway.... if the functional size of the air chamber changes, at the right moment, the whole shock will feel more linear and less progressive (than a single air chamber shock).

    If you are doing a bunch of jumping and big drops (6 foot plus? I mean real feet, not mtbr feet) then maybe you want more progressive feel.
    Maybe I'm misunderstanding the DRCV marketing, but I believe the DRCV chamber is connected to the main chamber. That means that as soon as the chamber opens, the air pressure is equalized between the chambers. So there is no magic voodoo for Fox engineers to work here. They just manufacture to Trek's design specs.

    My guess is that Trek designed the suspension with a focus on pedaling efficiency, realizing that 90% of their customers don't push the limits of suspension. For the 10% that do, DRCV isn't optimal.

    Edited to add:
    Don't take the DRCV criticism the wrong way - I love my EX. I think Trek nailed the designs on pretty much everything since adding ABP. And the slightly slacker angles and thru-axle front & rear on the 2012 are awesome. I just think I'd prefer a non-DRCV suspension to match my riding style & terrain.
    Last edited by mtnbkaz; 11-20-2011 at 07:44 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyPedals View Post
    I am bottoming the fork on 3-4 foot drops(real feet) and I'm bottoming HARD. Also on steep rollers I'm hitting bottom. Trust me this fork bottoms WAY too easy at 25% sag. Bump it up to 15% and it bottoms a little less but it's way too harsh on everything else.
    This fork has ZERO Progression. It is a great fork for XC rides though when you start pushing harder that's when the lack of any progression shows. I really wish there was a way to add a little bottom out progression. The concept is good but I believe the execution is a little flawed.

    JP
    It's possible to make a fork ramp up faster by adding fork oil to the air and damper chambers, effectively creating a smaller air chamber. I've never taken a fox fit/drcv fork apart though, so I wouldn't be sure where to add it. Normally Fox says to add 5cc to the air chamber to keep it lubed IIRC, so you could increase by 5cc until you get the progression you want.

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    Fox tech actually said that adding oil wouldn't work.I don't know why. I was told the only "fix" is to replace the DRCV cartridge with a standard Float air cartridge.

    JP

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyPedals View Post
    I am bottoming the fork on 3-4 foot drops(real feet) and I'm bottoming HARD. Also on steep rollers I'm hitting bottom. Trust me this fork bottoms WAY too easy at 25% sag. Bump it up to 15% and it bottoms a little less but it's way too harsh on everything else.
    This fork has ZERO Progression. It is a great fork for XC rides though when you start pushing harder that's when the lack of any progression shows. I really wish there was a way to add a little bottom out progression. The concept is good but I believe the execution is a little flawed.

    JP
    how does the rear feel on the 3-4 foot drops? i would say that's the max air im comfortable with on my current set up. im not too woried about the fork for now if i upgrade i will be upgrading to a tallas

  16. #16
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    The rear actually feels pretty good to me. I am definitely using all the travel but I never feel it bottoming.

    JP

  17. #17
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    I have a 2012 Remedy 9 and agree with JP and mtnbkaz. When riding slowly the suspension willingly uses its travel and feels plush. When you start going fast or it starts getting rough it feels too harsh and will skip around instead of maintaining traction. It does pedal and climb amazingly well but I bought this bike to get aggro on the descents.
    I'm disappointed because I demo'd the 2011 Remedy 9 and absolutely loved it. It felt perfect from the moment I jumped on. So plush and so much control. Didn't have to fiddle with a thing. On my 2012 no matter how much I fiddle I can't find the sweet spot.
    The 2011 had a DRCV rear shock and regular Fox Float fork ( with a custom trek tune).
    The 2011 rear shock felt so plush and bottomless so it can be done with DRCV and I assume it's a tuning issue with the new one.
    I have my new bike in the shop now and and they are checking oil levels etc. ( it is not leaking or losing pressure). I believe it is a tuning issue though.
    I am considering changing the fork cartridge to a regular float.
    Has anyone thought about removing the pin that activates the DRCV on the rear shock and just turning it into a virtual HV air canister? I talked to a suspension guy who said it is easily do-able but would it solve the problem?
    I do love everything else about the the bike though so hope I can get it sorted.

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=Linkdog8;8802883
    Has anyone thought about removing the pin that activates the DRCV on the rear shock and just turning it into a virtual HV air canister? I talked to a suspension guy who said it is easily do-able but would it solve the problem?
    [/QUOTE]

    I'm thinking about doing that once the new bike smell has worn off. No data yet to prove this, but eye-balling it, I'm guessing that the volume of a fully open DRCV is somewhere between a standard and HV air can. A fixed volume should provide a consistent spring rate and be more tunable.

    Another option would be to fill in the DRCV chamber (not sure if this is possible yet), similar to how people add shims to the HV can to reduce the volume and tune the spring rate.

    Yet another possibility would be to cut the DRCV valve rod/pin to prevent it from opening, effectively eliminating it and treating the shock as a standard air can.

    For now, I'm just keeping my bike tuned more for XC and I take out the Remedy when I want a plusher ride (although my Remedy is setup more like a Scratch Air).

  19. #19
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    I think you described it best when you said " a fixed volume should provide a consistent spring rate."

    I took out a 2012 ex9 from my lbs for a blast this afternoon.
    It is nearly identical in spec to my remedy 9 except for tires and travel.
    I wanted to see if it suffered the same suspension issues.

    It did.
    The head mechanic has been riding it and he described the feel as " inconsistent" and that really does sum it up well.

    I am really tempted to swap the fork cartridge and remove the drcv bits from the rear shock but it is going to cost around $500 I'm guessing as once they pull them apart they have to replace all the fluids and seals anyway.

    Hopefully someone else does it first!
    I'll probably just keep riding it for now as it is still so fun to ride and it doesn't seem to slow me down anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Linkdog8 View Post
    I am really tempted to swap the fork cartridge and remove the drcv bits from the rear shock but it is going to cost around $500
    $500?? I don't think it should be that much. No idea what the Fox air cartridges are going for these days, but last time I had to replace one, it was in the ~$120 range. If your seals are still good, you don't even have to rebuild the whole fork for that. It's a 5 minute job to pull the air spring, top off the fluids (they're just for lubrication on the air side - no damper to mess with), pressurize the chamber, and go.

    You could probably even sell the DRCV internals to someone who bought an EX8 to cover the entire cost. For that matter, peel off the DRCV sticker from the fork to go with the cartridge if someone wants it.

  21. #21
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    @mtnbkaz - How do you "tune” a rear shock? Can my LBS do it? As @Linkdog8 said the 2011 he demoed had a properly tuned shock. @cowboypilot says the same thing about a 2011 and others have said that it works great.

    I have posted more about my issues on the DRCV problems as well. My bike is a 2012 Remedy 9.8.

    Mark

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    I had the same problems with my DRCV shock on my '10 Remedy.
    Had to ride at +30% sag to be plush but then it blew through travel to easily.
    Since I installed RWC needle bearing kit instead of DU bushings on lower mount, the shock is more plusher and I ride now with 15 psi more pressure, which helps with bottoming.
    Stock DU bushings were so tight that it was causing huge amount of restriction ...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark747 View Post
    @mtnbkaz - How do you "tune” a rear shock? Can my LBS do it? As @Linkdog8 said the 2011 he demoed had a properly tuned shock. @cowboypilot says the same thing about a 2011 and others have said that it works great.

    I have posted more about my issues on the DRCV problems as well. My bike is a 2012 Remedy 9.8.

    Mark
    Tuning can mean multiple things. In this thread, "setup" is probably a better term for what I've been talking about rather than "tune" since we're mostly referring to properly setting up air pressure for a shock. (And the challenges of doing that when the spring rate changes 50% into your shock stroke.) Setup is also subjective, which is why some people have no issues with the way DRCV works and others do. A firm suspension setup to me, may feel too plush to you.

    True "tuning" usually refers to the internal valving of the compression & rebound circuits in the shock. In general, all rear shocks are factory tuned to try to match the characteristics of the suspension design (rising rate, falling rate, compression ratio, etc.). Most bike companies market this as "custom-tuned suspension" but it's really just matching an out-of-the box tune from Fox to match the design characteristics of the frame. If you look on a Fox shock, there is a sticker indicating the stock tune for the compression and rebound circuits. (E.g., on my 2012 EX, the compression sticker indicates "L" for low compression, rebound indicates "M" for medium rebound damping. A different bike might use a stock Fox shock with a "M" compression and "H" rebound tune.)

    Companies like Push can modify the internals to customize the compression damping to match your riding style/preferences, but local shops generally can't do this. (Many local shops don't even change shock seals in house.)

  24. #24
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    Hi, I came across your post about possibly removing the DRCV plunger on your fox shock to basically create a HV canister that would be more tunable than the DRCV. I have a Gary Fisher Rumblefish and my riding is leaning more toward AM and light DH for which the DRCV shock is really no good. If I had been a little more knowledgable about the design of this shock and the lack of upgrade options due to the side mount design I never would have purchased the bike but too late now.
    So have you tried this yet? I have had my bike for 3 years now and am willing to be a guinea pig on this one but would like some extra input before I possibly render my shock a paper weight haha. I do all my own work and am pretty familiar with the workings of this shock so let me know what you think, thanks.

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    I did pull the DRCV valve from my shock. It's really easy to do - it's just a plunger rod held captive by a spring and c-clip.

    The DRCV chamber is much higher volume than I would have guessed. Running in HV mode makes a more consistent spring curve but you still need to run the same high pressure for bottom-out resistance (that didn't change from the original shock of course). In HV mode, I get a lot of pedal bob with pro-pedal wide open but running it in the middle pro-pedal setting works well.

    What I want to do (kind of haven't thought of this for awhile so thanks for the reminder) is find something like a block of hard rubber that I can shape to fill up the DRCV chamber, effectively reducing the air volume. That should allow running a lower air pressure which I think will work better for my riding style.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkaz View Post
    Maybe I'm misunderstanding the DRCV marketing, but I believe the DRCV chamber is connected to the main chamber. That means that as soon as the chamber opens, the air pressure is equalized between the chambers. So there is no magic voodoo for Fox engineers to work here.
    .
    They are connected, but at full shock extension they are two separate/disconnected air chambers. They "connect" only once the shock is pushed down, probably somewhere around 40-60% travel. At that point, the air in the first chamber has been compressed to a pretty high psi, then "equalizes" with the second chamber.

    This is why Trek/Fox instructs you to cycle the shock after you add air, and you can feel this phenomenon the first shock cycle after adding air.

    So, at full extension, the air in the secondary chamber is much higher psi then in the first chamber.

    Now, there's no way to measure JUST the pressure in the secondary chamber at full extension. And my observations here aren't really relevant to your riding experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rfxc View Post
    They are connected, but at full shock extension they are two separate/disconnected air chambers. They "connect" only once the shock is pushed down, probably somewhere around 40-60% travel. At that point, the air in the first chamber has been compressed to a pretty high psi, then "equalizes" with the second chamber.
    Since my original comment months ago, I've disassembled the shock. The chambers are only disconnected by the DRCV valve, which is a simple rod with an o-ring that seals the hole between the 2 chambers. There is a metal ring attached to the shaft that pushes up on the rod to open the valve at 50% shock travel.

    So when Fox/Trek tells you to cycle the shock when pressurizing it, that's so that the air in both chambers equalizes. Otherwise, when you initially air it up, you might have aired the main chamber to 200psi but the DRCV chamber is lower. Once you cycle the shock, the 2 chambers are equal but lower pressure.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkaz View Post
    Since my original comment months ago, I've disassembled the shock. The chambers are only disconnected by the DRCV valve, which is a simple rod with an o-ring that seals the hole between the 2 chambers. There is a metal ring attached to the shaft that pushes up on the rod to open the valve at 50% shock travel.

    So when Fox/Trek tells you to cycle the shock when pressurizing it, that's so that the air in both chambers equalizes. Otherwise, when you initially air it up, you might have aired the main chamber to 200psi but the DRCV chamber is lower. Once you cycle the shock, the 2 chambers are equal but lower pressure.
    I think we may both know how the shock works but are explaining it with different semantics. Numbers below are hypothetical.

    I'm sure there is a rod and o-ring that seals the hole between the two chambers-- and until that rod is pushed (shock at 50% travel/compression) then the chambers are "disconnected".

    If I put 200psi into the shock (200psi reading on the pump guage), remove shock pump, then cycle the shock, here's what happens. the 200psi of air compresses in the first chamber, maybe loses half of its volume before that rod/0-ring is pushed. If it loses half its volume, then, the pressure at that point in the first chamber is now 400psi. The o-ring opens (for the first time since since removing shock pump) and now that 400psi volume of air THEN equalizes with the secondary chamber, maybe back down to 280psi, and continues to compress (ramp up) from 50-100% of compression, (maybe up to 600psi or more at bottom out position). Then lets say I get my fat arse off the bike and the shock extends from bottom out position. when the o-ring closes at 50% travel the 280ish psi remains in the (now closed/static) second chamber, and the reduced molecules of air in first chamber expand as the shock returns to full extension, leaving maybe 180ish psi in the first chamber. Hence, after the shock is cycled, and at full extension, the rod and o-ring closed, the second chamber has higher psi than the first.

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    Yeah, we're saying the same thing here. I was just clarifying since earlier comments from some people speculated that the 2 air chambers were completely separate.

    You're right, the pressure would equalize when the main chamber is compressed to 50%. I don't know what the actual size of the air chambers is and I haven't used Boyle's law in almost 20 years so I'm not going to speculate about what the static pressure in the DRCV chamber would be. But regardless of actual numbers, the end effect is the same - at the point the DRCV valve opens, the volume of the system increases, which causes some people to blow through the 2nd half of their travel.

  30. #30
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    I'm interested in the Remedy 9, but am a little leery of the DRCV fork based on what I've been reading in this and other threads. Would it be worth it to have a shop swap/upgrade to a RockShox Revelation? I actually have a Sektor Coil RL 150mm right now that would work, but it's almost .5-.75# heavier than the Rev or Float 32.
    "Got everything you need?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
    I'm interested in the Remedy 9, but am a little leery of the DRCV fork based on what I've been reading in this and other threads. Would it be worth it to have a shop swap/upgrade to a RockShox Revelation? I actually have a Sektor Coil RL 150mm right now that would work, but it's almost .5-.75# heavier than the Rev or Float 32.
    Try the DRCV fork out and see if you like it. If not, switch, since you have nothing to lose. I have the DRCV fork on my Fuel and I have no gripes about it.

  32. #32
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    I'll give it a test ride and see how I like it. I may even opt for the Remedy 7 and upgrade the drive train components. The 7 has the Evolution Series Float RL, but still has the RP-2 DRCV in the rear, but that's been around for a few years now.

    My current bike has full X9, Crosstrail UST wheelset, and XT brakes, so I may just swap all those components over and save a few hundred bucks.
    "Got everything you need?"

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    For the physicists in the forum (all 2 of you . Is there any way to tune this shock? Could the pushrod be slightly shortened so that the second air chamber opens under higher pressure, or are the two chambers specifically sized in relation to each other? I like the DRCV, but have the same issues as other posters on big hits (it always bottoms out). It seems that, not without some irony, the DRCV has succeeded in being so like a coil that it also has the coil's primary weakness which is everyone needs a different coil depending on their weight etc but there is no way to change that with the current DRCV. Am I right here?

  34. #34
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    I am really surprised to hear how many people are having "issues" with their DRCV. I run mine at a bit less air pressure on both the front and back of my bike and it seems to run well. I don't do any major drops but any jumps I have taken it performs well.

    I am curious if these shocks are being pressurized properly. If you watch the how to videos, you have to make sure to fully cycle both the fork and shock once you fill it up and double check the pressure. Otherwise the second chamber won't properly fill and you can have issues with the performance of the suspension.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by hungrytiger View Post
    For the physicists in the forum (all 2 of you . Is there any way to tune this shock? Could the pushrod be slightly shortened so that the second air chamber opens under higher pressure, or are the two chambers specifically sized in relation to each other? I like the DRCV, but have the same issues as other posters on big hits (it always bottoms out). It seems that, not without some irony, the DRCV has succeeded in being so like a coil that it also has the coil's primary weakness which is everyone needs a different coil depending on their weight etc but there is no way to change that with the current DRCV. Am I right here?
    Dude if you are interested in the bike, buy it and ride it before you make any judgments of it not working well. Trek knows what they are doing and you might not have the issues these other people are having. The bike is not exactly cheap and you would more than likely have to pay on top of the price of the bike to get another fork. Also note that the Fox Forks have the E2 Tapered steerers and I am not sure if you can get the Rock shox with that as that affects the handling of the bike.

    Good luck with your purchase and I hope you enjoy the bike!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Britishnate View Post
    Dude if you are interested in the bike, buy it and ride it before you make any judgments of it not working well. Trek knows what they are doing and you might not have the issues these other people are having. The bike is not exactly cheap and you would more than likely have to pay on top of the price of the bike to get another fork. Also note that the Fox Forks have the E2 Tapered steerers and I am not sure if you can get the Rock shox with that as that affects the handling of the bike.

    Good luck with your purchase and I hope you enjoy the bike!
    I think you meant to reply to someone else here?

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by hungrytiger View Post
    I think you meant to reply to someone else here?
    You are right, I hit quote on the wrong post. I meant to post it on this one

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
    I'm interested in the Remedy 9, but am a little leery of the DRCV fork based on what I've been reading in this and other threads. Would it be worth it to have a shop swap/upgrade to a RockShox Revelation? I actually have a Sektor Coil RL 150mm right now that would work, but it's almost .5-.75# heavier than the Rev or Float 32.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Britishnate View Post
    Dude if you are interested in the bike, buy it and ride it before you make any judgments of it not working well. Trek knows what they are doing and you might not have the issues these other people are having. The bike is not exactly cheap and you would more than likely have to pay on top of the price of the bike to get another fork. Also note that the Fox Forks have the E2 Tapered steerers and I am not sure if you can get the Rock shox with that as that affects the handling of the bike.

    Good luck with your purchase and I hope you enjoy the bike!
    Yeah...not going to drop 3K+ on a bike with a proprietary fork that reportedly has some problems just to "see" if it works for me. The E2 geometry is also something that turns me off, as I don't care for proprietary equipment. If I don't like a part, I want to be able to swap it out without voiding a warranty or messing with the geometry of the bike to ill effect.

    But this is all a moot point now. I ordered a 2012 Santa Cruz Blur LT on Monday. Non-proprietary equipment, and a little more geared to climbing than descending which fits my riding style. I appreciate everyone's input as it's helped me make what I feel is the right decision in my purchase. Cheers!
    "Got everything you need?"

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    E2 is not proprietary. It's just Trek's fancy way of saying "tapered 1.125 to 1.5"

    E2 says nothing about the geometry of the frame.

  40. #40
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    Aha, I was just a bit thrown off as someone suggested that since the bike had an E2 fox fork, I may not be able to get a compatible Rockshox fork. However, if it's just a normal tapered headtube there's no reason why another fork wouldn't work.
    "Got everything you need?"

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
    Yeah...not going to drop 3K+ on a bike with a proprietary fork that reportedly has some problems just to "see" if it works for me. The E2 geometry is also something that turns me off, as I don't care for proprietary equipment. If I don't like a part, I want to be able to swap it out without voiding a warranty or messing with the geometry of the bike to ill effect.

    But this is all a moot point now. I ordered a 2012 Santa Cruz Blur LT on Monday. Non-proprietary equipment, and a little more geared to climbing than descending which fits my riding style. I appreciate everyone's input as it's helped me make what I feel is the right decision in my purchase. Cheers!
    Congrats on picking out your new bike. I hope you enjoy it.

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    I don't know what mtnbkaz is talking about, my DRCV shock on my 2011 Remedy is awsome. I can run it really plush through harsh DH and techy stuff and it feels amazing, and then I'll take it of like an 8 foot drop with the same air pressure, and the shock still takes the hit very well.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2012bikerguy View Post
    I don't know what mtnbkaz is talking about, my DRCV shock on my 2011 Remedy is awsome. I can run it really plush through harsh DH and techy stuff and it feels amazing, and then I'll take it of like an 8 foot drop with the same air pressure, and the shock still takes the hit very well.
    Seeing as he said it a year ago, I don't think he remembers what he said. Since this has been brought back to light, I like my DRCV rear shox on my Fuel. I don't have DRCV on the fork however.

  44. #44
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    DRCV tuning you say?

    A little interesting tidbit for DRCV owners coming VERY soon......

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=1&theater


    drcv worth the trouble?-trek-pro-2.jpg

    Darren

  45. #45
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    drcv shock on my 2014 trek remedy is broken and on its way to fox. The can cracked. I don't know that you can say this is fox's fault. it isn't like a systemic problem, where the company has been negligent. Still, after 2 float rp23 with bad dampers and a dhx air with a bad propedal, I am begining to get pretty sick of fox. I am looking hard at the monarch rt3 debonair

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by taletotell View Post
    drcv shock on my 2014 trek remedy is broken and on its way to fox. The can cracked. I don't know that you can say this is fox's fault. it isn't like a systemic problem, where the company has been negligent. Still, after 2 float rp23 with bad dampers and a dhx air with a bad propedal, I am begining to get pretty sick of fox. I am looking hard at the monarch rt3 debonair
    Would the Monarch rt3 debonair be a direct bolt in replacement for the FOX Float DRCV rear shock on a 2015 Fuel EX8 27.5. The bike is only one ride old (30min ride on tame cross country trails) and the rear shock is leaking fluid like a pensioner and losing 50 psi in a ride. How do these shocks hold up to spirited riding. I'm 43 and don't even ride hard and it has failed.

  47. #47
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    RS made a specific debonair for the trek bikes that bolts right on. Rock Shox Monarch RT3 Trek(med) air shock*, 1.9x7.25", Frame Shocks

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by taletotell View Post
    RS made a specific debonair for the trek bikes that bolts right on. Rock Shox Monarch RT3 Trek(med) air shock*, 1.9x7.25", Frame Shocks
    Thanks that's good to know if I have more Fox Float problems.

  49. #49
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    Best thing you can do with a DRCV...
    Throw it away and get a Cane Creek Double Barrel

  50. #50
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    Except the ccdb doesn't mount to a trek without a bund of ghetto rigging. The monarch debonair does.

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    Quote Originally Posted by taletotell View Post
    Except the ccdb doesn't mount to a trek without a bund of ghetto rigging. The monarch debonair does.
    offset bushings arent that ghetto

    this is the eventual plan for my fuel. i cant stand my dcrv, it bottoms like crazy, even with the push spacers installed.

  52. #52
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    If you know a good site that sells the offset bushings ready to go then post it up. I would rather have more options than just a monarch.

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    Offsetbushings.com - Standard & Offset bespoke bicycle shock hardware ? Offset Bushings

    ive never bought anything from them; but i have been referred to them 2-3 times by people who have, they have only said good things about them, quality and customer service wise.

    it is who i will be going through, once i get the shock and some basic measurements from my fuel, i will be starting this.. seriously cant wait, i dont think i will ever buy another fox shock again.

  54. #54
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    Awesome. Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by taletotell View Post
    Except the ccdb doesn't mount to a trek without a bund of ghetto rigging. The monarch debonair does.
    I've got a 2014 Remedy 9, 19.5" frame. I installed a Double Barrel Air CS. Didn't need anything special to mount it up. Just some standard variety Fox bushings. 10 mm up top, 6 mm down low. Piece of cake.

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    Did you notice a change in geo? Do you know the stock shock size? Cc shock size?

    I don't know the shock size on the bigger bikes, but chances are the i2i is off by a couple mm; some say you won't notice a difference, but i really dig the geo the way it came so I plan on using offset bushings to get the i2i closer. I2i is 6mm longer on the ccdb air versus the drcv on my fuel.

    FWIW, I have a 2014 26 fuel ex. My stock drcv size is 184x50; cc shock I plan on putting on it is 190x50..

    Edit:
    Also glad to see the CS fits! I was a little worried there could possibly be interference with the bottom of the top tube.

  57. #57
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    Hey guys,

    Jeron from Offsetbushings.com here!

    Drop us an email if you have any questions. We have made plenty for Trek bikes using DRCV shocks over the years.

    Along with that we have had many customers wanting to use other shocks which need a shorter e2e length. It's the only way to get other shocks to fit without ruining the geometry so far. I don't come on here a huge amount so as I say, email is the quickest way to get a reply

    Thanks!

    Jeron

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by blindboxx2334 View Post
    Did you notice a change in geo? Do you know the stock shock size? Cc shock size?

    I don't know the shock size on the bigger bikes, but chances are the i2i is off by a couple mm; some say you won't notice a difference, but i really dig the geo the way it came so I plan on using offset bushings to get the i2i closer. I2i is 6mm longer on the ccdb air versus the drcv on my fuel.

    FWIW, I have a 2014 26 fuel ex. My stock drcv size is 184x50; cc shock I plan on putting on it is 190x50..

    Edit:
    Also glad to see the CS fits! I was a little worried there could possibly be interference with the bottom of the top tube.
    Didn't notice change in geometry at all. I went with the same dimension 7.87x2.25 (or closest since Trek is known for slight variations on industry standards).
    The only thing I noticed was a great improvement in handling.
    Also, I run less air pressure. In the DRCV I was running about 220 psi, in the CCDB I run about 170 psi. I weigh about 230.

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    drcv worth the trouble?

    Quote Originally Posted by fuel15 View Post
    Would the Monarch rt3 debonair be a direct bolt in replacement for the FOX Float DRCV rear shock on a 2015 Fuel EX8 27.5. The bike is only one ride old (30min ride on tame cross country trails) and the rear shock is leaking fluid like a pensioner and losing 50 psi in a ride. How do these shocks hold up to spirited riding. I'm 43 and don't even ride hard and it has failed.
    Two answers to your question:

    YES! The Monarch would be an excellent upgrade to the standard DRCV shock. I have one on a Remedy 9 and is fantastic. They do run higher pressures than the cane creek, but because of the larger negative chamber you don't lose any small bump compliance. I also have a Re:aktiv shock on my Fuel and it's a night and day difference from the "normal" DRCV, so would also be a good upgrade.

    However, that leaking shouldn't happen, take it back to your LBS and get them to warranty it.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by jester6578 View Post
    Two answers to your question:

    YES! The Monarch would be an excellent upgrade to the standard DRCV shock. I have one on a Remedy 9 and is fantastic. They do run higher pressures than the cane creek, but because of the larger negative chamber you don't lose any small bump compliance. I also have a Re:aktiv shock on my Fuel and it's a night and day difference from the "normal" DRCV, so would also be a good upgrade.

    However, that leaking shouldn't happen, take it back to your LBS and get them to warranty it.
    Thanks for the info Jester.

    At this stage I'm still arguing with Trek about the warranty issues. 6 weeks after purchase, one 30 minute ride and then the bike is still waiting to be repaired. It takes Trek 1 week to reply to an email and then to brushed off?? Will definitely be the last Trek I purchase.
    2015 Trek Fuel EX8 27.5
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  61. #61
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    What does your LBS say?

  62. #62
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    Fox warrantied my crap shock I think you should talk to them about it.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by jester6578 View Post
    What does your LBS say?
    They are sticking with their original comments. If I remove the shock myself that they will void my warranty on the whole bike. They have removed the shock and I'm still waiting for it to be returned from Fox or Trek. The shock was removed by my LBS and I will have to pay the LBS the $65 to keep my warranty. I understand legally they are within their rights to do so. I will pursue the matter through Trek head office (very little joy so far) and secondary to that through the office of fair trading (Australia) It's very disappointing the lack of support I have received from Trek Australia. I have discovered a bike is only as good as the warranty and support you receive. I would sell the bike if I wouldn't lose so much money.
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    That's too bad, I've always had good experiences with Trek USA. And is the shop seriously going to charge you for this? That's just wrong, and bad business. (And potentially illegal if they sold you a faulty and are now charging you to fix it.)

    If my shop did that, I'd take my bike and go somewhere else.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by jester6578 View Post
    That's too bad, I've always had good experiences with Trek USA. And is the shop seriously going to charge you for this? That's just wrong, and bad business. (And potentially illegal if they sold you a faulty and are now charging you to fix it.)

    If my shop did that, I'd take my bike and go somewhere else.
    Yes I have given up on the LBS changing their mind. I will definitely be taking my business elsewhere along with the mates I ride with. We all talk and they are amazed at the poor support I have received. I will be telling anyone that will listen about my experience to save anyone else going through this crap. I will still lodge a claim with the office of fair trading as it's just wrong to treat consumers in this way.
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  66. #66
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    Hey, I have a spare drcv air volume tuner from push. I'll sell it for $10 plus shipping within North America.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jester6578 View Post
    That's too bad, I've always had good experiences with Trek USA. And is the shop seriously going to charge you for this? That's just wrong, and bad business. (And potentially illegal if they sold you a faulty and are now charging you to fix it.)

    If my shop did that, I'd take my bike and go somewhere else.

    A quick update on the Warranty issues with the Fuel EX8. After not having much help from the first guy at Trek Australia that I have been emailing. I contacted Trek Australia via phone this morning before collecting the bike from the local Trek shop. Repaired and ready to ride after 6 weeks.

    Trek Australia were very helpful and answered a few questions about the way the warranty has been handled by the local Trek dealer. Trek confirmed that the local Trek dealers statements were false and untrue. (namely that I would lose all warranty on the bike if I removed the rear shock or any parts myself as I'm not a bike mechanic) In other words he generates more income or you lose your warranty. I expressed my disgust at the local store with Trek and that I would no longer support a store with such bad business practices.

    I collected the bike this afternoon and was not charged the $65 fee to remove and refit the shock after Trek contacted them. Thanks Ryan from Trek Australia with your help in sorting the issues with the local Trek dealer and the false claims. I don't think the LBS are doing the Trek brand any favours.
    2015 Trek Fuel EX8 27.5
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    Thanks for the update! Sorry you dealt with such a crappy LBS, I hope Trek gives them a good kick in the crotch (and I'd hate to be the Trek rep you were emailing).

    Have fun on the new bike!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jester6578 View Post
    Thanks for the update! Sorry you dealt with such a crappy LBS, I hope Trek gives them a good kick in the crotch (and I'd hate to be the Trek rep you were emailing).

    Have fun on the new bike!
    Thanks jester. Yes looking forward to getting my first full lap of the local track this weekend.

    I have a feeling Trek may have a few words with the LBS after I send a follow up email to thank Trek for their assistance and let them know what I think of the LBS. Just his attitude when I collected the bike was poor and his statements very untrue. It makes you wonder how many others may paid him for work to keep from losing their warranty too. Social media and word of mouth are great tools for keeping businesses honest. Any way hopefully she is all fixed. Time to get out and ride.
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    7 weeks after purchase it feels good to back out riding again. Loving the new bike once again and happy to report that the rear shock is performing much better and no signs of oil leaking this time. I might need to play around with stem height / length a bit as it isn't climbing as well as it should. Good to be out riding again.
    2015 Trek Fuel EX8 27.5
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  71. #71
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    Wait until you guys ride the new Re:Aktiv DRCV......forget RT3 DebonAir, DB-Inline.
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Wait until you guys ride the new Re:Aktiv DRCV......forget RT3 DebonAir, DB-Inline.
    How does it compare? I keep the standard DRCV in trail and it doesn't really bob much and does feel bottomless. Small bump compliance is okay though I'd like to improve it if possible.

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    Just an update.. 4 Months after Trek rebuilt the rear shock. There is no signs of any leaking at all and retains the air pressure. I still didn't like the feel of the DRCV shock and it blew through all of its travel too easily. A problem that most slightly heavier riders seem to experience. As a last resort I purchased the push volume reducer kit and can honestly say that I'm very impressed with the improvement. Still not the best shock available but it has transformed the bike into something I'm happy with. Hopefully the leaking issues don't happen again too soon.
    2015 Trek Fuel EX8 27.5
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