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  1. #1
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    Bontager Race Tubeless.....how difficult are they really?

    I have a new bike with Bontrager Race Tubless rims and have yet to have a flat (knocking on head), but after reading some of the reviews here, I am thinking of buying a second set of tire levers in case the first set breaks.

    http://www.mtbr.com/cat/tires-and-wh...73_157crx.aspx


    Are the tires really so difficult to change as many of the reviewers state? Or are some reviewers simply blowing a small problem out of proportion, as sometimes happens in the reviews section.

    Many thanks in advance for any insight into this.
    "Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances of survival for life on earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet." -Albert Einstein

  2. #2
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    I can remove my tire with my bare hands. What tires are you using on yours? The beads stretch a bit once they have been mounted for a while. Bontrager recommends that the tires are mounted overnight before trying to set them up tubeless. One thing to note with all assymetric rims is that it is easier to remove or mount a tire from the side that the spoke holes are biased to (disc side on rear, non disc side in front). Also, make sure you push the entire bead into the center channel before trying to pry it off the rim. I always start removing tires at the valve area, to get the most out of the center channel. This assuming you have the TLR rim strip installed. With out it, it should be even easier.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdiddy
    I can remove my tire with my bare hands. What tires are you using on yours? The beads stretch a bit once they have been mounted for a while. Bontrager recommends that the tires are mounted overnight before trying to set them up tubeless. One thing to note with all assymetric rims is that it is easier to remove or mount a tire from the side that the spoke holes are biased to (disc side on rear, non disc side in front). Also, make sure you push the entire bead into the center channel before trying to pry it off the rim. I always start removing tires at the valve area, to get the most out of the center channel. This assuming you have the TLR rim strip installed. With out it, it should be even easier.

    I use stock components until they wear/break, and as such, I am using Bontrager ACX tires. I haven't gone tubeless yet, but have read many accounts of people having a heck of a time getting tires (of any kind) off these rims and was curious how much of that was true.
    "Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances of survival for life on earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet." -Albert Einstein

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianthebiker
    I use stock components until they wear/break, and as such, I am using Bontrager ACX tires. I haven't gone tubeless yet, but have read many accounts of people having a heck of a time getting tires (of any kind) off these rims and was curious how much of that was true.
    If they are not tubeless tires they should be easy to get off. I have the same wheels and have run both tubed and tubeless. The first time you put a tubeless tire on it is tough. But once they have been on for awhile they are easier to get on and off. Tubed tires can easily be done with your hands but I always have my multi tool with integrated tire levers just in case. I have gone tubeless and carry a tube but with sealant I have never had to use the tube in 2 years of riding.

    Best suggestion is to try and pull the tire off at home to see how easy it is. That way you know what you are in for on the trail if you need to.

  5. #5
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    definately worth it, for me it meant less puncture and pinch flats, my Bontrager race light rims so far have treated me well.

  6. #6
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    pretty easy

    just changed my first tube on new ex 9 with race lite rims and stock tires. actually easiest change i can remember in a long time, didn't even need tire irons

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by coop27
    just changed my first tube on new ex 9 with race lite rims and stock tires. actually easiest change i can remember in a long time, didn't even need tire irons
    really?

    I tried like hell last night with the same rim and tire and couldn't do it even with a lever (Race Lite and Jones tubeless)

    I broke one lever then finally gave up.

    I tried "soaping the beads" and that didn't help either.

    Quote Originally Posted by kdiddy
    I One thing to note with all assymetric rims is that it is easier to remove or mount a tire from the side that the spoke holes are biased to (disc side on rear, non disc side in front).
    Is that true? Can anyone else confirm that?

    Thanks if it's true.
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2017 Trek Farley 9.6 with Lauf
    2017 Diamondback Haanjo Trail Carbon
    2016 Scott Solace 10 Disc

  8. #8
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    If anyone still has the tubeless rim strips in (black plastic), pull 'em out, and put on regular rim tape. Then tube changes become a piece of cake.

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