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  1. #1
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    Attn. Palomiono Owners: MUST HAVE UPGRADE

    Hey all Palomino owners, I just installed the new Maverick upgrade monolink during my lunch break today and took an extended break this afternoon to go for a test ride round the are of my office (out in the countryside). Wow, what a difference!

    I had expected the ball bearing equipped monolink to feel similar to my Klein bushing monolink when it was worn out (which unfortunately happened a few times), but then without the play in the rear end.

    I was wrong.

    The bb equipped monolink is much more responsive than I had imagined, and more or less equals my hyper sensitive Look-fournales parallelogram front fork for small bump sensitivity. I now float over sections seated that I used to have to jump over or stand up over before to keep momentum. It feels as if I have gained another 20 mm of travel when riding the new monolink, just in the way the bike swallows up things that used to give me a kick in the butt. I needed to slide the seat forward a little to regain my familiar setup as well as change my rebound setting to get the old familiar suspension balance.

    I have noticed I am loosing WAY less momentum, especially on sharp obstacles on the trail, than I did before (no empirical evidence, but I am certainly flying though washboard sections and potholes faster with a similar level of control, and often staying seated when I used to stand). Added to that, the creaking I had in the bike when I really cranked hard has completely disappeared. I clearly feel the difference in the standing suspension performance: the rear wheel stays glued to the ground longer than it used to. I now ride certain lines much more smoothly (read: i can push myself harder without eating the farm) when descending and standing than with the old link, as well as with standing sprints.

    There is a little more bob when standing, probably due to the combination of reduced stiction compared to the bushings & the relocated BB. This is by no means enough to be what I would consider a disadvantage: The improved suspension performance absolutely outweighs this effect, as I am riding faster than before with more comfort, and can take shorter lines than before. I think Iíll be increasing my baseline shock pressure in the coming week or two as I get used to the new feel and find a new optimal balance between the front and rear suspension systems and pedaling feel.

    And not to be forgotten: the black link just looks a whole lot better than the dull grey unit that used to be in the bike. Yeah, performance comes first Ė but your eyes also want some improvement, and itís definitely there.

    Seriously, the is the one of the best upgrades I have made to my bike ever. If there was a review section on the monolink upgrade in the reviews, i'd give it 5 chillis for value (cause its so darn good) and 6 chillis overall. Seriously, skip a meal, or maybe one of your cat, and buy this thing. You wont believe it.

    Phill, Madrid, Spain.

  2. #2
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    some photos

    Here's some Photos of the upgrade and how it looks on the bike as a whole.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    There are 3 or more post below about the same subject.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by banks
    There are 3 or more post below about the same subject.
    yes, I am aware of that.

    None had any testimonials on how it worked, so I started a new thread.

  5. #5
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    Wow!!!

    I'll second Palomino's review.

    I received my new monolink from Maverick yesterday. I installed it last night and immediately noticed a difference in the smoothness from the Klein link.

    My bushings were bad, the monolink/crank was creaking and I could feel and see the play in the back end which was also effecting my shifting. It doesn't take long for the bushings to go from fine to bad. For those of you that have not experienced this yet, It starts with a slight creak from the BB area followed by louder creaking and looseness. The amount of time it takes will depend on how much you ride.

    The install is relatively simple. I'd rank it as a 6 on a scale of 1 to 10 of bike repair difficulty (1 being adjusting your seat, 10 being rebuilding your oil/air fork or lacing a wheel). You will most likely need some special tools to get your crank arms and bottom bracket removed from the old unit. The rest can be done with a few hex tools a wrench set and a 10mm socket (used to tap out the old bushings).

    A few tips on the install... Have all your lock-tites ready to go. You will need blue and green. Use a bungee (lightly tensioned) between your rear wheel and your seat rails this will keep your rear frame from crashing into the main frame when the mono-link comes out. You will need to cut your front deraileuer cable to remove it from the Palomino if it has a crimped end, otherwise it will not slide out of the guide on the Klein monolink. If you cut it right at the crimp, slide it out and put a new crimp on immediately you won't get any cable fray which will lead to cable replacement. If you can, get your hands on a small torque wrench with inch/lb measurements. It will be nice to have. You will need to move your seat. Up at a minimum, up and forward if you want to retain the same seat to pedal ratio you had with the old link.

    Today I took a 10 mile ride and I'm pleased to say I'm very happy with the resiults. The rear end feels solid again. The ride is plush and smoother all around. For me it was noticeably smoother when landing on smaller drops 3-6" when the front wheel is in the air (almost to the point of not being able to feel it) . My shifting works again and there is no more creaking, yay!!!

    This is defintely the best things to happen for Palomino owners. In essence you now have the one, truly critical thing the Palomino was missing that the Mavericks and Sevens had.

    THANK YOU MAVERICK!

    Now to see how it holds up to some long term abuse!

    P.S. Forgive me for posting this on the other threads related to this part, but I want to make sure Palomino owners find out about it.

  6. #6
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    shifting problem still present!

    Rode my Palomino for the second time since my LBS installed the upgrade linkage. Its definitely smoother and more plush than with the the stock component.It has just a little bit of bob when climbing which kinda sucks,but not a big issue for me. What is driving me absolutly NUTS though is this...when climbing in my middle ring (which I use mostly) and i come across an obstacle (like a really big rock) which requires me to wheely into it or over it, the chain seems to shift itself into the granny gear or the space between the granny and middle ring causing a loud noise and usually a loss of forward motion. Its definitely doing it when the rear suspension reacts to a bump. Im using an brand new XT crank,cassette and Shimano chain with an XTR front derailler. Has anyone had this problem and been able to fix it? I had the same problem with the stock linkage. The bike is great except for this problem!!! Are full suspension bikes prone to these problems?
    Im ready to throw in the towel and just ride my trusty hardtail. Any constructive suggestions would be appreciated.

  7. #7
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    what rear gear is the chain on when your trying to do this?

    when you look down at the chain is the chain line moving from the right to left at a steep angle as it goes from the front to back? It could be that the sideways pull of the chain line is trying to pull the chain off the middle ring onto the granny at the front cause the side angle is so steep. The combination of a hard push on the pedals and the suspension action may be doubling up the side pull effect.

    Are there spacers between the drive side bottom bracket cup and and the bottom bracket shell? If so, you could possibly swap the spacer from the drive side to non drive side so that the front rings are shifted to the left slightly ( as you look down on it ) and this may reduce the side pull effect.

    Or you could just drop to the granny and use a higher gear on the rear cassete to maintain a straighter chain line.



    Edited to add:

    Its also possible that since its a brand new chain, its still to wear in a little and be supple to side-flex. Newer chains tend not to have much sideways play until they are worn in for a while. As a result, the chain cant handle the side pull yet and so tries to straighten out, and in doing so is straightening out by coming off the middle ring.

  8. #8
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    Im always in one of the bigger rear cogs when it happens. Just checked the chainline and its definitely on an angle as you described. There are no spacers on the bb. Im gonna ride it again today and try to use the granny gear when climbing....I have always been in the habit of using the middle ring whenever possibe.
    Thanks for the input!

  9. #9
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    wow. just noticed..

    Quote Originally Posted by Palomino
    yes, I am aware of that.

    None had any testimonials on how it worked, so I started a new thread.
    But you really like your saddle tipped up to the sky like that? Man. ouch.

    -don

  10. #10
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    The bike Klein should have made!

    Just wanted to add my "3rd" to the glowing reviews above. Everything Palomino said and more. The bike already outclimbed the lengendary Mantra it replaced, but the Maverick link is incredible. The rear tire just rolls over roots and rocks when climbing. Suppleness is a delight and descending is vastly improved. The forward BB makes the susp much more active out of the saddle and the rear tire just sticks to the ground, period. FWIW, I'm running at less than 80% of weight: 130 psi and I'm about 155-160 with gear. Using the Maverick mod on the XTR 952 FD, I haven't experienced any of the problems discussed above. The mod worked well with the OEM link and shifts even better now.

    The Maverick link is an even better upgrade than the switch from 7.0 to 7.2 shock, which made a hugh improvement in itself. I thought I had the pivot bushings working pretty well (see below) , but there is just no comparison with the fully active bearing link. There is only an 80 gram increase in weight over OEM bushing link. Well worth it.

    Installation notes: The BB is moved about 1cm (1/2 in) forward. If your saddle is already at max forward position to maintain knee/pedal alignment you may have a problem. There is no significant change in BB height though. If using outboard bearing crank/BB, you might want to face the shell before installation. Mine was a bit off square. Also be sure you run a tap or the bolt into the FD mount before installation--tends to be a bit gummed up with paint or powdercoat. I also took the opportunity to repack the link bearings and BB with good WB grease. Otherwise, installation was pretty trivial. Only concern is that the spacer fits snugly between the bearings and might make removal a bit problematic when it's time to replace bearings. Dennis, if you're reading this, any advice on bearing removal?

    For those still running the OEM bushing link, a couple of points. The pivot axle doesn't have to be torqued nearly as high as spec'ed. 30-50 in-pds is plenty to eliminate slop. Just use plenty of blue Locktite and check regularly. Use a dry lube on the pivots (White Lightening, Krytec or for Canadians, MEC Dry Lube) and the action will be much smoother and the waxy lubes won't pick up dirt. Many times apparent wear is just the fact that the pivot axle is a bit long. The Al wash under the bolt dishes with use and the bolt bottoms on the axle rather than the eyelets on the frame. This keeps you from drawing the top hats in snug, regardless of torque applied. Grind a few mm off the axle and voila, same as new bushings.

    If anybody is looking for new, in package bushing kits and/or OEM Mg link, send me an email and we can work something out. Having tried the bearings, no way I'm going back to the bushings.

    Maverick you've made a real winner. Hope this might persuade Trek to keep Klein in production.

    Richard

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