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  1. #76
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    ZAF you seem to be able to give some advice since you have a similar bike as myself.

    I have been concidering a 29er HT to either replace or compliment my 2011 Fuel EX8. I am looking at a few bikes. The HT thing as me wondering since I have been on a FS since 1997. I am looking at a cannondale F29-2 or the Trek SF elite. I have also thrown around the Idea of a SF 100 elite or stache 8 and replace my EX8. I really like the lefty on the cannondale. My trails here dont seem to be very technical. I can appreciate the comfort of a fs bike. I just rode about 20 miles yesteday. I dont really go for long epic rides. Most very person I ride with has a 29er HT. As I said I dont compete but may want to do a couple TT in the future. I can appreciate the efficiency of an HT.
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  2. #77
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    Just ordered mine today, can't wait. I was tempted by the Stache 8 because of the 2X10 but I may just look at converting this one at some point. The shop is going to convert it to tubeless for me once it arrives and I may ask them about a 2X10 conversion as well. They said it may come in on Wednesday so it may be ready for pick up this Friday, holiday weekend riding stoke!

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by stygz1 View Post
    ZAF you seem to be able to give some advice since you have a similar bike as myself.

    I have been concidering a 29er HT to either replace or compliment my 2011 Fuel EX8. I am looking at a few bikes. The HT thing as me wondering since I have been on a FS since 1997. I am looking at a cannondale F29-2 or the Trek SF elite. I have also thrown around the Idea of a SF 100 elite or stache 8 and replace my EX8. I really like the lefty on the cannondale. My trails here dont seem to be very technical. I can appreciate the comfort of a fs bike. I just rode about 20 miles yesteday. I dont really go for long epic rides. Most very person I ride with has a 29er HT. As I said I dont compete but may want to do a couple TT in the future. I can appreciate the efficiency of an HT.
    Another guy who lives in Central Australia who came off a 26 dual suspension now rides a 29 hardtail and doesn't feel the need to go 29er duallie. The small bumpy stuff that is hard to tune out with a rear shock (without blowing through travel on big hits) is precisely the sort of thing the 29er helps with.
    I also spent some time in Alice, and I'd have to agree. I'm not sure the dually would give you much more comfort/speed if the trails are not overly technical.
    Rimmer - "There's an old human saying - if you talk garbage, expect pain"

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by stygz1 View Post
    ZAF you seem to be able to give some advice since you have a similar bike as myself.

    I have been concidering a 29er HT to either replace or compliment my 2011 Fuel EX8. I am looking at a few bikes. The HT thing as me wondering since I have been on a FS since 1997. I am looking at a cannondale F29-2 or the Trek SF elite. I have also thrown around the Idea of a SF 100 elite or stache 8 and replace my EX8. I really like the lefty on the cannondale. My trails here dont seem to be very technical. I can appreciate the comfort of a fs bike. I just rode about 20 miles yesteday. I dont really go for long epic rides. Most very person I ride with has a 29er HT. As I said I dont compete but may want to do a couple TT in the future. I can appreciate the efficiency of an HT.
    It's a really hard choice, or a really easy one.

    I run a Fuel EX 9 and the Superfly AL Elite, and to be entirely honest, I love them both. As Alexrandall said, the 29er wheel has a really beautiful way of cutting out chatter on trails due to its roll over and that is perfect for the terrain out here.

    I also have my Fuel EX perfectly tuned in at the moment, its suspension is just right on the money, no bob when I climb, flies over small bumps beautifully and as soon as going gets technical the DRCV kicks in and just pushes through that travel and begs for more, it is so seamless and such a clever suspension set up...it's hard not to love.

    There's so much to love about both bikes. I love the hardtail because it reminds me not to be a lazy rider. The rougher ride of the bike forces you to use your body a lot more, especially when the going gets technical, as well as better line choices, I feel it builds my skill level better then the full suspension does. But that's not to say it's simply a "training rig for the full susser", that would cheapen how much I love the 29er.

    When I go out to the shed, I have trouble choosing which bike I want to ride on any given day, because I truly enjoy both of them so much. As such, it means I'm probably not going to be very useful in dispensing any advice that would involve choosing one over the other, because any such decision I feel should be met with "BUY BOTH!!!". Take comfort in the thought that both bikes are gorgeous to ride, you can't really go wrong with either.

    Test ride as much as possible, see what you like and what you don't, just make sure you're buying for what YOU want, and not because "all the other kids were doing it!"



    On a side note, still haven't gotten around to going tubeless on the 29er, I have the rim tape there and plenty of sealant, but haven't found the motivation to set it all up. Thinking I might soon though, repaired a very flat rear tyre this weekend and the wheel felt so heavy when I picked it up...might be nice to shave a little bit of weight of the bike.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
    Trek Superfly AL Elite (2013)

  5. #80
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    Quick question on setting up you Fuel suspension. How far off in PSi were you from the suggested amount per trek by you r weight vs what you actually set it at? Example my front shock suggests 70 psi for my weight and I find it good at 60psi. But is can be difficult for me to set sag regaurding fork stiction. Also did you have pro pedal on when setting rear sag? Do you ride mostly with pro pedal on or use DCRV? I am finding it more justifiable to have both a 29er ht and my fuel. I plan on demo the Stache and also a cannondale F29...love the lefty! But yes when things get technical or tight trails the fuel accelerates and handles it very well.
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  6. #81
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    With the front fork, the Trek website's calculator was way off, suggesting really high PSI settings that were making the fork use barely blow through half the travel. As I recall, it was telling me to set it at 130PSI on the website and I was finding 100PSI gave me a nice firm front end setup, so it was WAY over reading. (Mind you, different year and model of the Fuel EX, not sure if the 2011's were over reading or not).

    The rear I pretty much ALWAYS have in pro-pedal, very rarely move it out of that setting and if memory serves I've got that running a little stiffer (245) then recommended 230 PSI on the Trek website, personal prefference there though. The Trek website is great for giving you a nice ballpark or starting point, but full sussers really need to be tinkered with and experimented with to get the settings you like. Don't be afraid to fiddle.
    Always set the rear sag with the chamber open, don't have it in pro-pedal for any sag settings. With the front fork I believe they recommend you set your rebound to be as slow as possible as well, and, as with ALL DRCV suspension setups, make sure you cycle the fork/shock through at least 60% of its travel after you've pumped it up to make sure both chambers are equalised before setting sag.


    The cannondale's are beautiful bikes, a few guys out here running the lefties. The Hardtail is really nice, I'd love to invest in a lighter wheelset for the 29er, get the sucker running tubeless and throw on some Ice-Tech rotors, but funds are tight at the moment. Still, the bike is so much fun, it has such a great feel to it; there is something about climbing on that bike, the way it hops up technical ascents, how composed it feels at speed, how nimble it is in corners.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
    Trek Superfly AL Elite (2013)

  7. #82
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    Yea my front for would be different. I dont have DCRV on the fork. Only the shock. I may go over my sag settings again. Yea the rebound was too fast for my liking. I got it backed off by 1 click, Probably could go 2 clicks from suggested.
    2014 Niner RIP 9 (Roval Carbon wheels, Pike)

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  8. #83
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    I just noticed I would like to get a set of those grips with the orange ring and maybe the seat clamp also in orange. That would be some nice touches to my all black EX8 with orange candy pedels
    2014 Niner RIP 9 (Roval Carbon wheels, Pike)

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  9. #84
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    Sick

  10. #85
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    SO sick

  11. #86
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    Picked mine up on Wednesday, I was really surprised that it had come in early. So early in fact, that I didn't really get a chance to prep the wifeI am hoping to get it out for a ride later today. Boy was she and is still pi$$ed, they just don't get that it's okay to have more than one bike at a time......
    I will post pics and first ride thoughts later. I have been looking at in sitting in my office for the last day and a half and I can say the level of for and finish and attention to detail is awesome. The longer you look at it the nicer it is. Can't wait to get it dirty!

  12. #87
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    Just another glory shot. Was doing some riding down a great fire track, loose rocks everywhere, follows a ridge line, up and down with some great rolling descents. Came across a little camp spot and stopped to take some pics.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
    Trek Superfly AL Elite (2013)

  13. #88
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    Pictures as previously promised. The attention to detail and craftsmanship of this bike is awesome. If your on the fence just go get one!

    http://2013treksuperflyalelite.shutt...m/pictures#n_5

  14. #89
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    I've ordered mine some new Ice-Tech rotors as well as a new 100mm Bontrager Race X lite 17 Stem so I can really slam those handlebars down a bit more. I have an Hour of Power race this Saturday, thinking the 29er might well be my weapon of choice for it, especailly seeing as there's a great section of track that is quite open and flowy which can really take that big chain ring for a spin.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
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  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    I've ordered mine some new Ice-Tech rotors as well as a new 100mm Bontrager Race X lite 17 Stem so I can really slam those handlebars down a bit more. I have an Hour of Power race this Saturday, thinking the 29er might well be my weapon of choice for it, especailly seeing as there's a great section of track that is quite open and flowy which can really take that big chain ring for a spin.
    Curious to see how the SLX/Ice Tech combo works for you...I was thinking of going the same route on an inbound Stache 8 (and perhaps my AL Elite also). Good luck @ the Hour of Power!

  16. #91
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    Casualties of war. Think I did it on my last lap, must have clipped a rock, because I don't remember anything eventful happening, or even recall hearing the tyre scrape, but there was a nice big gash in the sidewall, and I was thankfully still running tubulars for it.
    Of course, it HAD to be on my Ikon 3C Exception Series front tyre...couldn't have happened to my cheap folding Aspen on the back. The hole is pretty significant, tried patching it, but even a double folded five dollar note was stretching out. Pretty pissed about that, as the tyre's only seen about 300km.




    Otherwise, the bike ran beautifully. So stiff and responsive, just ate up the track.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
    Trek Superfly AL Elite (2013)

  17. #92
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    Sorry for the double post, but my stem finally arrived, so I got to slam the handlebars. Also went over to a tubeless setup, which knocked a bit of weight off the bike. With saddlebags (including a spare inner tube), pump and bottle cages mounted to the bike it's weighing in at about 12.0kg.

    Also took a hot knife out and cut all the small circlular lugs off the Crossmark so the larger lugs can dig in better on the sides. Not perfectly visible, was a slow process, and there's still about 1mm on each circle off the tyre wall...was afraid of putting the blade all the way through.

    Need to trim down my fork post as well.


    Last edited by Zaf; 01-18-2013 at 11:57 PM.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
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  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaf View Post
    I've ordered mine some new Ice-Tech rotors as well as a new 100mm Bontrager Race X lite 17 Stem so I can really slam those handlebars down a bit more. I have an Hour of Power race this Saturday, thinking the 29er might well be my weapon of choice for it, especailly seeing as there's a great section of track that is quite open and flowy which can really take that big chain ring for a spin.
    Did you notice any difference with the ice tech rotors? Are you riding the fuel much anymore? I am still waiting to demo the 29er (superfly and stache) next month at the Atlanta southeast convention. What size superfly do you have again?
    2014 Niner RIP 9 (Roval Carbon wheels, Pike)

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  19. #94
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    Running 19" Superfly.
    Still ride the Fuel EX heaps, truly love both bikes.

    The Ice Tech's are silent. The original rotors were quiet, no doubt, the rear squeaked a little after being ridden hard, breaking power is a little bit more grippy, but not massively. Still, looks pro, and it's that extra bit of confidence against brake fade.

    Sent from my GT-P7500 using Tapatalk HD
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
    Trek Superfly AL Elite (2013)

  20. #95
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    Trimmed down my steerer tube. That slammed stem, there's no coming back, it feels amazing. Had to re-do my fork pressures and raise them up about 15PSI (to 110psi) as the new riding position has me far more over the front. It is VERY comfortable in climbs now, I barely need to shift my weight to keep the front from rising, feel very centered both in and out of the saddle.

    This morning put a personal best time down on a nice little section of track known out here on the bike. Loving this bike!!!

    Ordered her a new CHris King top cap in the same orange, to give a little more flash to it. Such a gorgeous bike.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
    Trek Superfly AL Elite (2013)

  21. #96
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    Stache 8 or Superfly AL Elite

    Hello all, I have a Fuel EX 9.8 but after reading a lot I'm really thinking to buy a HT 29er. I'm not sure if I should go with the Stache 8 and its nice features such as post mounted rear break, 142x12 rear axle, direct mounted front derailleur, XT shadow plus rear derailleur, 2x10 or a Superfly AL Elite with 100mm fork, XT crank, 32spokes rims.
    I do race for fun a few times a year, my races include some 6hour races, one 12 hours race and a few XC races. As I said I race for fun and to see if I have improve my riding.
    I live in the Cincinnati area and my very knowledgeable friend is recommending against the Stache because might be to similar to the Fuel EX and even more on the technical trail side of things, and that will be a great bike going downhill but not so good on the uphill side of things. Any advice it is greatly appreciated.

  22. #97
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    2013 Trek Superfly AL Elite (pics)

    I'm in the same boat trying to decide between a stache and superfly. Bobby at my local shop let me borrow his personal stache. Here's my thoughts.

    Thought I'd provide an update on my experience with a Stache 8. I had the opportunity to borrow a personal bike from Bobby at FreeFlite (thanks Bobby!) and take it out for a good hard ride to really see what the "trail" geometry was all about. The trails of choice were Tanasi. We parked at ThunderRock campground and rode the Old Copper Road out to Boyd Gap and Brush Creek and then up into Tanasi for a tour of Chestnut, Quartz, BearPaw, etc. The Tanasi trails offer a great mix of long, steady climbs, steep short climbs, fast downhills, some techy singletrack - although not too much, Tsali-esque lakeside trails and ear-to-ear grinning fun.

    Bobby's Stache was built with a much more all-mountain flavor than I would run, which included FlowEX wheels with some monster 2.35 Bontrager tires, with tubes, a RockShox Reverb dropper post, BlackSpire chainguide, 12-34 gearing and a 3x XT crank running 2x with a bashguard. The stem was a shorty 60-70mm stem with a +17deg rise and a superwide 750mm+ wide lo-rise bar. The only thing in common with the complete bike from Trek was the frame and fork - everything else was what Bobby chose to run and what suits his riding style, which is decidedly more focused on all-mtn/freeride.

    Positives:
    -The cockpit "feel" of the bike was excellent. I felt very much in the bike rather than on top of the bike like I have in the past with most other 29'rs.
    -The new Fox CTD fork was hands-down the nicest fork I have ridden. The climb-trail-descend options were spot on, damping was very good for my 155-160lb frame and the small bump compliance (read: plushness) was excellent. At speed, the high-speed compression and damping characteristics just worked. In the "climb" mode, the fork was solid unlike every other reba I've had in the past. Initially I wasn't sure that I "needed" the extra 20mm of travel, but by the end of the ride, my most literal comparison was to the old saying of having a V8 in your car - "there's no replacement for displacement." The extra 20mm was a welcome addition when hitting waterbars at what feels like warp speed and finding that you're still moving forward and not flat on your back from an endo.
    -The 1deg slacker headtube and shorter effective top tube made for a very neutral, fun, flickable bike. I kept looking for the feeling of driving a truck through the tight trees, but it wasn't there. The Stache doesn't have shorter chainstays, <17", like the Honzo, Nimble9, YelliScreamy; however, even at 17.5", the bike flicked through the trees very nicely and much differently than the previous 29'rs I've ridden. A close second was some recent time aboard a Cannondale flash 29'r - that bike was very flickable as well, but also very XC focused. I guess, the best way to describe the whole package was that it was smooth, fast, predictable in the rough and very stable in fast sweepers. I quickly gained confidence in the bike, tires...the whole package. It turned in nicely, drifted well and had good manners at speed.
    -15mm maxle and 142-12 rear axle: These axle configurations were noticeably stiffer - especially in the chop. I can see how std 135spacing and 9mm QRs are becoming outdated.

    Negatives:
    -Weight. Bobby's build had a 1975g wheelset, 2 tires that were 850g each, plus tubes for a total of over 8.25lbs of rolling weight. That was a lot of weight to get up to speed and my knees feel it today. I believe a Crest wheelset at 1600g, 2 550g tires, some stan's sealant and rim strips and I could easily lose 2-2.25lbs in rolling weight. I didn't care for the dropper post and would likely opt for a nice carbon post to offset the aluminum frame. I believe his bike was easily 28lbs of all mountain fun - I'd like to see it closer to 25.
    -Gearing. Again, some of this is just due to Bobbby's build, not what I'd choose, or what comes stock. The bike wasn't setup to be a particularly efficient climber. I did my best hanging on the back of a good group, but could really feel the weight of the wheels, the 34 in the back and the 26/38 in the front. I think with a silghtly longer and lower stem and proper gearing, the bike would climb very well.

    Neutral:
    -Aluminum Frame: This is a high end, butted and sculpted aluminum frame that rode very well and didn't feel like the stiff, non-butted aluminum of old. It was remarkably...neutral. It wasn't as sexy as the much more en vogue carbon frames with sub 20lb builds, but it did have some cool frame shaping and characteristics that were really cool and functional such as no bridge between the chain and seat stays allowing for a fatter tire and reduced mud collection, flattened seat tube at the BB to allow for a bigger tire, tapered headtube, etc.

    Last thoughts:
    I believe this, or similar, will be my next "go to" bike for everyday riding. The question that remains is whether I can get the weight down to a respectable 24.5-25lbs in a 17.5" and still comfortably race the bike in an occasional duathlon or XC race, or ORAMM, PMBAR, etc., and still have a bike that excels at singletrack bliss; I believe that I can. Trek did a good job on this frame and the only thing that I thing would make the geometry any better would be a slightly shorter chainstay of 17-17.2" vs. 17.5", which, not coincidentally is the same as the Superfly.

    Huge thanks to Bobby at FreeFlite for "handing over the keys" to his personal ride for a day of fun.

    mike

  23. #98
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    2013 Trek Superfly AL Elite (pics)

    So...I placed an order yesterday for a Stache 8
    Last edited by mhopton; 01-30-2013 at 04:06 AM.

  24. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhopton View Post
    So...I placed an order yesterday for a Stache 8
    Thank you for the real detailed information Mhopton. From what I read the stache8 is more a All Mountain bike (similar to a Remedy) than a XC bike, is that correct? I have a Fuel EX 9.8, which is my single trail bike and I want to have another bike that feels and handles a little bit different. So I was wondering if Stache 8 will be too similar to the Fuel EX 9.8? or if I'm not going to have as much fun because we don't have enough challenging trails around here.

    The Superfly sounds like a real fun bike for XC races but I'm not sure if I will have fun if I'm just going out for a quick 1 or 2 hour ride..

  25. #100
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    I'm loving the Superfly. The Bike just feels so right, I can't remember what I've written so far but I'll try and do a little recap in a similar fashion to what Mhopton did for his friends Stache. Mine will likely compare it more to the Fuel EX 9 I have though, as they're the two bikes I ride.

    Positives
    - Cockpit as well, especially now I've got my stem height suited for me, the bike feels so steady. Even though it shares the same wheelbase as my Fuel Ex, so much easier to track stand on feel very planted on the bike.
    - Cornering, the G2 geometry is magic, probably a large reason it feels so stable turns in beautifully. The top tube doesn't angle down as agressively as the Fuel and the larger wheels to make it a little trickier to really lean the bike into corners, but don't take that as a statement that it doesn't want to. Low speed cornering and climbing switchbacks are just amazing to ride on this bike.
    - Stiffness, you never feel the bike flex and it really just powers in when you stomp the pedals. It's really hard to describe, but the bike makes you want to attack hills like a single speed and just throw your momentum at them. I absolutely LOVE climbing hills on this bike.

    Negatives
    - Compliance, or more lack thereof, the bike is really stiff, and that back end does has a tendency to "bounce" a little when hitting small obstacles. It's sort of what you expect from aluminium, a carbon or steel frame this is not, and on rocky trails you will feel it all through your hips and legs afterwards. Get the cockpit right, I was having a little bit of back pain with the previous higher stem.
    - Orange colouring, don't get me wrong, I LOVE IT!!! Think it's the sexiest bike there is, but it's almost impossible to find accessories for the bike that come in orange, and if you can, they cost a fortune (here's looking at you, Chris King mango hubs). It seems the best colour in the world comes with an exclusive buyers list and price tag for those who want to keep their pretty colour scheme.

    Neutral
    - The CTD Fork. Don't get me wrong, it is an amazing fork, and CTD is so simple. It might just be the trails out here and the way technical stuff appears out of nowhere in them, and there's simply no time to switch the CTD setting, a remote CTD would have been welcome, but a firm trail setting does a beautiful job as an all rounder. I would really love a Kashima option for the fork, and the DRCV fork on the Fuel EX has left me spoilt with how much customisation is on that. CTD is beautiful, but I miss some of finer tuning that I have on my Fuel EX.
    Trek Fuel EX 9 (2012)
    Trek Superfly AL Elite (2013)

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