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  1. #1
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    2008 Fuel EX8 Derailleur Noise Unfixable?

    So I recently acquired a 2008 Fuel EX8 and am enjoying the bike so far. But...

    The drive train sure makes a lot of noise. The chain often rubs against the front derailleur when the chain is in a very angled position, such as smallest front ring and smallest rear ring. The LBS has basically told me that is how it is. They even have a handout from Shimano that they give out that claims the same thing. You'll have chain rub, tough luck.

    Is this true? Should I get a second opinion? It is not a huge deal, but it is just something that sort of aggravates me on a new bike. I hate hate hate noisy chains. Is the only solution to replace the whole drive train?

  2. #2
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    Reputation: shifturmind's Avatar
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    mine is the same way from smallest to largest
    2008 Trek Fuel EX 8
    2008 Trek 6500
    Yakima King Joe 2
    Softride Dura Rack

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the response, I definitely appreciate it.

  4. #4
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    It is my opinion that this came about when they went to 9 speed casettes. The chain line is so drastic when you go from small to small or large to large that the chain is most likely going to rub because they can not make front derailier wide enough to keep this from happening and still shift correctly. Some frames have better chain lines than others, but usually fs bikes are worse than hardtails. The best thing to do is to stay out of these extreme chain lines, it is hard on your drive train, but hard to do when you are used to doing this. When you are in your small front ring you could just use the first six gears on your casette, and when your in the middle front ring you have free reign over the whole rear, then when using the large ring only use the last six gears.

  5. #5
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    That is what I was planning on doing But you are right I am very used to using all the gears but it is more because they are there than I really need them. I just wanted to get some 3rd party reassurance. I trust the bike shop a lot but it just seems weird to me that they would release a product with this issue. Why not just use a cassette with less rings? ah well.

    On the bright side, I did pick up the Red Shield warranty when I bought the bike (sucker?). The guy I was talking to at the shop last night basically outright said, hey, every year now here is what you do - get into those extreme chain angles and just hammer those pedals. Wear that cassette and chain out and then you can come in and get a new one for free

  6. #6
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    i have the same problem on my ex9

    has anyone given up trying to get rid of this thru fine tuning and resorted to a bash guard?

  7. #7
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    Yes it is true, you will never get rid of the chain rub in its limits. And by the way you should never ride the chain in its extremes, smallest front- smallest rear, biggest front- smallest rear

    the only way you would be able to get rid of it would be to swap the front chainrings out and put a single bashring'd front, that way none of your gearing will rub

  8. #8
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    go to a 2x9 setup with 24/36 on the front and you will have more usable gear ratios and no extreme chain angles.
    cheers
    Pagey

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibis ripley
    It is my opinion that this came about when they went to 9 speed casettes.
    8 & 9 speed have the same free hub body, thus the same width sprockets set. 9 SPD chain is narrower, so if anything it would rub less, if in fact it was the problem, which it is not.

    I have worked in a bike shop for 20 year + & even sold treks in 07... unless you have a incompatible BB & FD, I see no reason why a good bike shop cannot set it up to NOT rub...

    Yes a poor chain line can make it harder to adjust, but not imposable... I say, shop around for another mechanic, as every day I set up the front D's to not rub (9 & 10 spd)... my 2 cent anyway...

    do this test for me...

    with the RD in the largest sprocket, undo the FD cable bolt & unwind the 'L' stop till it does not rub, or the FD hits the seatube. If it hits the seat tube & still rubs your BB is to narrow, if you are using shimano hollowtec 2 cranks, then you can't go wider & its treks fault not shimano's.

    If it does not hit your seat tube & does not rub, do up the FD cable, so it is taught, test you shifting again, it should be sweet...if it then rubs on the inside of the FD while in your big ring, then manualy widen the FD...

    good luck

    Best

    Ktronik

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the feedback everyone. I'll give a few of those things a try as far as adjusting things go. Being I just bought the bike I'd have to let ye old budget settle a bit before replacing anything.

    What drives me nuts is that I replaced an older Fuel 80 with this bike that had seamless shifting. Wonder what the difference was with that bike and this one.
    Last edited by Omicron; 11-03-2008 at 08:17 AM.

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