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  1. #51
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    I've gone from an Intense Slopestyle (160mm) to a Turner 5-Spot (140mm) to a Scout (125mm). I really can't notice any slow down in my riding, if anything I've got quicker.

    I really don't miss the little bit extra travel the other bikes had. I think my mindset has probably changed. le_buzz, you say you live for the 5% of trails where to can really fly. I live in similar riding territory and have the same attitude, but now I think I have more fun 95% of the time and don't notice a detrimental difference on those burlier trails. Weight shouldn't be a big problem, set the shock up with the right sag, put a few volume spacers in it so it ramps up for bigger jumps and crack on.

    I guess the other point is, you'll love whichever one you buy and it doesn't really matter!

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by noahhowes View Post
    I've gone from an Intense Slopestyle (160mm) to a Turner 5-Spot (140mm) to a Scout (125mm). I really can't notice any slow down in my riding, if anything I've got quicker.

    I really don't miss the little bit extra travel the other bikes had. I think my mindset has probably changed. le_buzz, you say you live for the 5% of trails where to can really fly. I live in similar riding territory and have the same attitude, but now I think I have more fun 95% of the time and don't notice a detrimental difference on those burlier trails. Weight shouldn't be a big problem, set the shock up with the right sag, put a few volume spacers in it so it ramps up for bigger jumps and crack on.

    I guess the other point is, you'll love whichever one you buy and it doesn't really matter!


    Hi Noah, I appreciate your input and think your point about the 95% is a good one.

    But I don't agree with putting volume spacers in a short travel bike to keep it from
    going through the travel too fast. While that idea might have some benefit in
    tightening up a mushy feeling FSR type suspension design, the Transition's GiddyUp design,
    is quite different feeling - much more linear, and it would be a shame to ruin such
    a well sorted design by modifying the shock that way. Maybe Transition should
    consider doing a 140mm version for those of us heavier riders or who just need a tad
    more suspension to work with.
    It would be nice if they added another 10mm to the carbon version. That being said,
    I'm looking forward to demoing the 125mm Scout, hopefully, I'll discover that 125mm
    is plenty!

  3. #53
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    Not sure why you would have issues with volune spacers, then make a for a better ride.
    The shorter Pikes come with spacers preinstalled.

    A 220lb buddy of mine has a Scout with a 140 Pike. With no spacers he had to run the Pike at 120psi to keep it from bottoming out. With that much pressure he complained about the harsh ride and lack of small pump compliance.
    He experimented and ended up running 3 spacers and only 90psi. With the lower pressure the small bumps compliance is silky smooth, but the fork ramps up just right so he only bottoms out are the harder hits.
    In the rear you can adjust it the same way with the bands.

    I've demoed a scout Several times and my buddy and I agree it pedals like it's listed travel, but when riding the rough stuff and jumping it feels more like a 140mm+ bike!
    If they ever release a carbon version I'll be all over it!
    14 Aurum, 15 P.3, 16 Fuse, 17 T130

  4. #54
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    The frame specs for Transition (and Kona) seem way longer (reach, top tube) then say Rocky Mountain, SC, etc. If any of you taller riders (I'm 6'3) could let me know which size Transition Scout, or Patrol you have and how you like it I would appreciate it. Note, I am torn between the L and XL.

  5. #55
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    6'3"... definitely go for XL. I own T.Bandit 29 XL and I'm 6'0" - gorilla arms

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  6. #56
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    6'3" and i'm on an XL. I wouldn't fit anything smaller. The Transition has the longer reach so that you can use a short stem.

  7. #57
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    Cool.. Thx.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by corey_rodriguez View Post
    The frame specs for Transition (and Kona) seem way longer (reach, top tube) then say Rocky Mountain, SC, etc. If any of you taller riders (I'm 6'3) could let me know which size Transition Scout, or Patrol you have and how you like it I would appreciate it. Note, I am torn between the L and XL.
    I'm 6'3" with 34" inseam on a L Scout with a 55mm stem. I was also torn between L and XL. In the past when I've been inbetween sizes I've sized up and regretted it, so this time I went down instead. So far I'm happy with the smaller bike. We have lots of tight single track and the smaller bike is more fun. Of course your riding style and trails may be a lot different.

  9. #59
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    6'4 on a XL Scout with a 35mm stem. Bike is super capable...honestly I have a new Nomad too and I'm using the Scout more and leaving the Nomad for DH duties only. Very quick bike that jumps with the best of them and climbs like a beast

  10. #60
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    question for Scout owners- do you feel the front end is slack enough when you are descending steep/rough trails? playful and jumpy is good, but is it stable and confident inspiring when the pucker factor increases. would really like my wife to get on one and this is a critical element that she would like improved over her current ride.

  11. #61
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    Not quite when it gets really steep and fast, proper DH territory, but anything short of that and it's fine. The longer wheel base does help too. I have a set of slackening bushes in the back and a slightly longer (36 at 150mm) fork which together probably take about 1-1.5 degrees off the head angle making it more DH friendly (also raises the BB by about 1mm, but I can't tell). My local trails are basically XC loops on the top of a valley with steep short super tech runs off the side so that works well for me.

  12. #62
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    FYI - I just posted a long term review of my Patrol here:
    Patrol Long Term review

  13. #63
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    Anyone here try their Scout with a 160 fork?

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hangtime View Post
    Anyone here try their Scout with a 160 fork?
    I want to know the exact same thing? how does it ride with a 160mm fork. Im considering a custom build with a 160mm travel Adjust Pike. I assume that would make it a better climber as i think it will drop to 120mm and a better DHer with a little more travel and slacker HA?
    My LBS says it would be bad idea and will mess with the geo too much.
    My local rides are very steep up and full DH down. There is not much rolling terrain here.

    cheers
    kev

  15. #65
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    I owned a scout for 3 months, rode very rocky steep stuff, even went to the downhill park. Then I bought a patrol. End of story. Unless you want a bike thats easy to throw around in the air, or you only ride on relatively smooth terrain, then get a patrol. The patrol climbs just as well as the scout trust me you'll be surprised, and it handles all the DH crap. I just got back from 2 days at Mammoth and I was riding just as fast as some not so advanced guys on full DH bikes. hands down the patrol is the best bike for trail riding and steep nasty dh stuff. My apologies for crappy grammar and writing, just wanted to put in my 2 cents.

  16. #66
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    That's good feedback. Cheers. Not many people have owned both scout and patrol. I have tested ridden a patrol and I love its dh ability and it climbed OK as well. But I'm getting into more pedaling and longer climbs so I just hoped that the scout climbed significantly better. However I still ride steep rough dh after the climbs so I need a bike to handle that too.
    Thanks for the feedback.

  17. #67
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    Kev, you're in Nelson? sheeeeeeeeeiit bro, you are in Patrol/Rune/Range terrain if there ever was, why mess around? here on the Island it's more of a decision, but in Nelson? good god man 160 travel all the way.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by cunningstunts View Post
    Kev, you're in Nelson? sheeeeeeeeeiit bro, you are in Patrol/Rune/Range terrain if there ever was, why mess around? here on the Island it's more of a decision, but in Nelson? good god man 160 travel all the way.
    Yeh it's steep and rough here but I have a DH bike so I want a bike that's easy to pedal up and fun down. My intense uzzi is 180mm bike and it's hard to pedal up. Based on the response above saying that the scout and patrol are very simular climbers it makes sense to get a patrol.

  19. #69
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    having said that, personal preference always comes into play. a friend has the Scout and loves it, he also has a full DH race bike and rides that Scout to it's max. you certainly could up fork it no problem and live with a more firm and direct feel in the back. i bet you know guys who ride hard tails in your terrain, it's always about feel and preference. if your mates are all enduro'ing as hard down as possible on trail bikes Patrol for sure. if they aren't about max speed down or your chops are that good, you could certainly have a great time on the Scout. i'm super tall and ride the Smuggler on all kinds of stuff but also have a Range when i want more cush. the Smug get's the nod 80% of the time though so much fun.

  20. #70
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    Cheers mate. It's nice to get feedback. I was looking for the best climber possible that could still dh well enough. As you say it's all personal preference. I cannot test ride a scout but I have ridden a patrol and it rocked the dh. But I felt it wasn't as good at climbing as I wanted. Perhaps I'm looking for something that doesn't exist. I was thinking of a scout custom build with 160mm pike travel adjust. I could even slack it out with offset bushing or Angle set. If the 160mm was too tall then I assume I could lower the pike with spacers or something down to 150 or 140.

  21. #71
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    Also, when I first switched from scout to patrol I didn't think the patrol was as good as the scout right away when it came to climbing. It took a little getting used to considering the longer wheels base and slacker angles. I guess in the end the Scout will probably climb better, but most immediate discrepancies fade with time as your body adjusts to climbing on the Patrol. If you're looking at making a Scout more slack with a longer fork you're half way to patrol anyway, you might as well just get the extra travel in the rear. Or just a quick thought, if you wanted to make the patrol a little easier to climb put the pike adjust on it, that way you could give a little less travel in front and make tighten up the angles at the same time. If that's a bad idea please someone chime in.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkies View Post
    Also, when I first switched from scout to patrol I didn't think the patrol was as good as the scout right away when it came to climbing. It took a little getting used to considering the longer wheels base and slacker angles. I guess in the end the Scout will probably climb better, but most immediate discrepancies fade with time as your body adjusts to climbing on the Patrol. If you're looking at making a Scout more slack with a longer fork you're half way to patrol anyway, you might as well just get the extra travel in the rear. Or just a quick thought, if you wanted to make the patrol a little easier to climb put the pike adjust on it, that way you could give a little less travel in front and mak
    e tighten up the angles at the same time. If that's a bad idea please someone chime in.
    It sounds like a good idea to me .the patrol has a good lockout in the rear so a travel adjust fork makes sense .for some reason I had never considered that.cheers mate.

  23. #73
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    I agree that putting a longer fork on a Scout does not make sense.
    If that is your inclination, I think you answered the question for yourself - get the Patrol!

  24. #74
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    I have a lot of momentum in the direction of buying a scout but I've only been attracted to it due to the assumption it climbs way better than the patrol. I think I'm a good enough dh rider to handle the shorter travel. But having said that. If adding a travel adjust pike to the patrol will improve the climbing efficiency and make climbing less work then I prefer the patrol. Trails here are steep up and down and rough too. There is no rolling terrain. It's all up then all dh. I'm just looking for a bike that's easy to climb so I can ride up multiple times.

  25. #75
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    One thing to consider is that putting a travel adjust fork on the patrol is going to make the bb really low when dropped.

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  26. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy R View Post
    One thing to consider is that putting a travel adjust fork on the patrol is going to make the bb really low when dropped.

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
    I think that would be OK for me on the climbs. I just spoke with transition and they were really helpful. They said the scout does climb better but it's not a big difference. The scout and patrol differ more on the dh. The scout more playful, flick able, the patrol more point and shoot dh style. So I'm made up my mind. It's a patrol. If the scout isn't a much better climber then I will go for the patrol.

  27. #77
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    I owned a Scout all last year and now I'm jumping to the patrol after riding my brother's. One thing to consider, besides the angles and travel, is that the Scout comes in at almost the same weight as the patrol. As far as long grinds to the top of the hill, I don't see any significant benefit of the Scout over the Patrol. On quick, steep, tech climbs, the head angle on the Patrol will be a factor but I'm willing to make that sacrifice for the downhill benefits. On fairly smooth trails, the scout is amazing downhill. But when it got rough, my bro on his Patrol would pull away fast.
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  28. #78
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    Cheers to everyone. My trails are not smooth and as much as I want easy climbs I do live for the dh. The patrol it is.

  29. #79
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    seems the most logical decision mate. cool that you can call and talk directly with Trans guys eh? some call tree system they've got! given what i know of where you ride the Scout would have been good, the Patrol better. less of a body beat down! is there one for you now or do you have to special order a 2016 and wait?

  30. #80
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    The shop has a good deal on a 2015 in orange but I'm not keen on that only because my tr500 is orange.so I will order one in.I like both of the colours available. I will custom build ,mostly because I want wide rims and I can take my XO drive train off my uzzi.

  31. #81
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    Ok, its a rainy day here so I'll bite. Due to a theft, I have significant time on both the Patrol and Scout. It is a really tough comparison because both bikes are so fun, but I'll try to explain what I found.

    -The Patrol has gobs of traction, both uphill and down. If you can keep your legs spinning, you can climb up damn near anything. The Scout is snappier feeling, but therefore gives up a little bit of that monster-truck feeling from the Patrol.

    -The Scout jumps really really well. But the Patrol encourages you to say F-it and skip the lander and huck to flat.

    -As far as efficiency goes, the Scout definitely beats the Patrol. On tighter trails it wiggles through the trees easier and is quicker to get off the ground when you want. On smoother, more bike park style trails it absolutely slays. You get more out of pumping rollers and working the trail for speed.

    -I truly believe both bikes are just as capable at going as fast as you want. The difference to me is the feeling. The Patrol wants to smash the trail to pieces, the Scout wants to go just as fast but jump over things the whole way.

    It's a really tough call between the two bikes and I'm still contemplating on which one to keep now that the Patrol mysteriously came back home. If you have any more specific questions between the two, fire away!
    Last edited by motomike; 11-18-2015 at 07:31 PM.

  32. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by motomike View Post
    Ok, its a rainy day here so I'll bite. Due to a theft, I have significant time on both the Patrol and Scout. It is a really tough comparison because both bikes are so fun, but I'll try to explain what I found.

    -The Patrol has gobs of traction, both uphill and down. If you can keep your legs spinning, you can climb up damn near anything. The Scout is snappier feeling, but therefore gives up a little bit of that monster-truck feeling from the Patrol.

    -The Scout jumps really really well. But the Patrol encourages you to say F-it and skip the lander and huck to flat.

    -As far as efficiency goes, the Scout definitely beats the Patrol. On tighter trails it wiggles through the trees easier and is quicker to get off the ground when you want. On smoother, more bike park style trails it absolutely slays. You get more out of pumping rollers and working the trail for speed.

    -I truly believe both bikes are just as capable at going as fast as you want. The difference to me is the feeling. The Patrol wants to smash the trail to pieces, the Scout wants to go just as fast but jump over things the whole way.

    It's a really tough call between the two bikes and I'm still contemplating on which one to keep now that the Patrol mysteriously came back home. If you have any more specific questions between the two, fire away!
    I live in Charlotte NC and it is very rooty here with some rocky spots. I ride single track and 9 out of 10 trails are never "smooth". There are a couple places but most are moderately technical. I am tiny, 5'8 140lbs - and coming from BMX catching air is my favorite thing to do. Does the Patrol maintain the "pop-ability" that the scout is so good at? Scout sounds like exactly what I am looking for but when I am going downhill I want to rip. I feel the insane rootage at speed, and my desire to soar might be too much for the scout. On the other hand I'm not doing down a literal mountain.

    Also, how does the scout handle the jump lines and drop offs and such?

    Just wondering what you would recommend, and how much of the flick-ability is lost going from scout to patrol.

  33. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobbyLight350z View Post
    I live in Charlotte NC and it is very rooty here with some rocky spots. I ride single track and 9 out of 10 trails are never "smooth". There are a couple places but most are moderately technical. I am tiny, 5'8 140lbs - and coming from BMX catching air is my favorite thing to do. Does the Patrol maintain the "pop-ability" that the scout is so good at? Scout sounds like exactly what I am looking for but when I am going downhill I want to rip. I feel the insane rootage at speed, and my desire to soar might be too much for the scout. On the other hand I'm not doing down a literal mountain.

    Also, how does the scout handle the jump lines and drop offs and such?

    Just wondering what you would recommend, and how much of the flick-ability is lost going from scout to patrol.
    Pretty much sums the bikes range up. Patrol to plow through, scout to pop anything you can.

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  34. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobbyLight350z View Post
    I live in Charlotte NC and it is very rooty here with some rocky spots. I ride single track and 9 out of 10 trails are never "smooth". There are a couple places but most are moderately technical. I am tiny, 5'8 140lbs - and coming from BMX catching air is my favorite thing to do. Does the Patrol maintain the "pop-ability" that the scout is so good at? Scout sounds like exactly what I am looking for but when I am going downhill I want to rip. I feel the insane rootage at speed, and my desire to soar might be too much for the scout. On the other hand I'm not doing down a literal mountain.

    Also, how does the scout handle the jump lines and drop offs and such?

    Just wondering what you would recommend, and how much of the flick-ability is lost going from scout to patrol.
    This is a good one, and since I live close by in Boone and have ridden most of the trails in CLT hopefully I can help. I would absolutely get the Scout over the Patrol if I lived in CLT. The Scout pops and jumps SO well, and the slightly extra efficiency you will get over the Patrol when pedaling will be really nice down there. The trails are rooty down there for sure, but the speeds that you can achieve aren't that high (relavitely) and the downhill sections are very short compared to what you get in the mountains. Unless you often take trips to WNC to ride Pisgah or bike parks I would definitely get a Scout. And even if you do ride in the mountains some, I think I would still lean towards the Scout because the majority of your riding will still likely be in the piedmont. Hope that helps. One thing is for sure, you will be very happy on either bike!

  35. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by motomike View Post
    This is a good one, and since I live close by in Boone and have ridden most of the trails in CLT hopefully I can help. I would absolutely get the Scout over the Patrol if I lived in CLT. The Scout pops and jumps SO well, and the slightly extra efficiency you will get over the Patrol when pedaling will be really nice down there. The trails are rooty down there for sure, but the speeds that you can achieve aren't that high (relavitely) and the downhill sections are very short compared to what you get in the mountains. Unless you often take trips to WNC to ride Pisgah or bike parks I would definitely get a Scout. And even if you do ride in the mountains some, I think I would still lean towards the Scout because the majority of your riding will still likely be in the piedmont. Hope that helps. One thing is for sure, you will be very happy on either bike!
    So... What are you keeping?

    (Small world, I rode with you in Stokesville back in June when we stayed at the lodge. I was the Marylander. Heard the story of your Patrol... Pretty nuts!)

  36. #86
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    What's the story?

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    He pretty much said it already... It was stolen, then reappeared a bit later. Guilty conscience I suppose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by motomike View Post
    This is a good one, and since I live close by in Boone and have ridden most of the trails in CLT hopefully I can help. I would absolutely get the Scout over the Patrol if I lived in CLT. The Scout pops and jumps SO well, and the slightly extra efficiency you will get over the Patrol when pedaling will be really nice down there. The trails are rooty down there for sure, but the speeds that you can achieve aren't that high (relavitely) and the downhill sections are very short compared to what you get in the mountains. Unless you often take trips to WNC to ride Pisgah or bike parks I would definitely get a Scout. And even if you do ride in the mountains some, I think I would still lean towards the Scout because the majority of your riding will still likely be in the piedmont. Hope that helps. One thing is for sure, you will be very happy on either bike!
    I appreciate the detailed response. Sounds like I may have to go for the scout since I will be riding around here for the most part. BYT interests me the most though, you think the scout would handle all of the jump lines without killing my thumbs?

    If I did take it to a smooth flowing DH park, like baileys- would it handle it? 90% of my riding wont be at places like that but for such a big purchase It would be nice to know that I COULD hit the big jumps with smooth transitions if I wanted to.

  39. #89
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    To quote Pinkbike's review:

    In fact, it's capable enough that I wouldn't hesitate to take it into a bike park to have a go on the flowier, jump filled trails, trails like Whistler's A-Line or Dirt Merchant where a longer travel bike isn't a necessity.
    There's some big old jumps on A-Line and Dirt Merchant, so yeah, I reckon it could cope

  40. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnarly View Post
    To quote Pinkbike's review:



    There's some big old jumps on A-Line and Dirt Merchant, so yeah, I reckon it could cope
    I supposed that answers my question perfectly, thanks! I think I'll try the scout. If I find myself shredding more technical gnar or the big lines at the park and want to slacken it some maybe I'll try a 150mm FOX34 or something. I am a poor college kid and I will be getting the cheap scout 4 and slowly upgrading anyway so it gives me some options.

    Thanks!

  41. #91
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    Has anyone had issues with Shimano 10 speed derailuer housing routing? It makes the awful loop with the higher point of entry on the derailuer as opposed to the SRAM 11 speed which looks pretty inline with the frame.

    I'm on a 2016 carbon Patrol XL.

  42. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDwayyo View Post
    So... What are you keeping?

    (Small world, I rode with you in Stokesville back in June when we stayed at the lodge. I was the Marylander. Heard the story of your Patrol... Pretty nuts!)
    Marylander?! You ride a Transition at Avalon by any chance?


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  43. #93
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    I was in the same questioning lately. But finally decide to go with the Patrol 3.
    Coming from 15 years of DH on a S8/V-10, switch to trail/enduro on a Xprezo Super-D for the last 3 years. Enjoying the climb if theirs a reward going downhill afterwards...

    Now my only dilemma is the size!

    I'm wondering what height and size people choose here.

    I've tried a large Patrol, the fit seems good with short stem and full forward seat but I didn't had a chance to try a medium.

    I'm 5'10'' 150lbs... any thoughts?

    I mostly ride tight but fast singletracks with some gnar, shore, burms...up and down and will certainly go ride the lift a few times with my DH buddy's I don't see much anymore since I'm more into trails...

  44. #94
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    Hey dh...I'm 5'10" 170, and I think it still comes down somewhat to arm length, torso length, and where your height is. I only wear 33 1/2" sleeves (got Celo arms), so the reach on the large Patrol and Scout just made me feel more forward than I wanted, even with 50mm stems. I went with the M scout after spending a full day on a L Scout. I rode a large Patrol, and it felt big. I wouldn't have even bothered adjusting anything to see if I would like it...I knew immediately I would want the M in the Patrol when I was deciding between the two. I opted for the Scout, because I do quite a few 20+ mile rides, and I can hit anything I'm willing to hit on the Scout. With your DH background, you would probably want the Patrol for sure, and from there I think it would come down to feel on the bike. I ride with an incredible rider who is only 5'7" and rides nothing but large bikes, so I guess there's no rule....just what you like.

  45. #95
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    Just my 2 cents:
    I took a Scout and a Patrol together with a friend for a test ride.
    We took turns riding AM loop that includes tech uphill, some flowish descents, very tech downhill and some kickers and drops (largest drop was 5ft).
    We redid most of the sections swapping bikes to get a feel for the difference and this was excellent because we could compare back to back runs.
    Patrol:
    Climbs pretty well for a 160mm, even surprising
    Slower to change directions
    Gives a bit of a "disconnected" feel i.e you feel/react to terrain in a more muted manner
    Pumps OK
    Absorbs drops/ Landings like butter
    Scout:
    Fast and Agile
    Turn on a dime and feels a lot more planted than Patrol
    You can feel terrain (I mean this in a good way - supple not jittery, but allows you to react)
    Pumps amazing!
    Manuals and bunnyhops easily!
    Climbs easier than Patrol
    Descends quicker than Patrol (again - depends on the rider)
    Absorbs drops/ Landings well (5ft drop was fine!) but you need to be a bit more precise - less room for error

    Note: Currently riding a Kona Process 134, I ride AM with a focus on descents and occasional DH. I don't ride long rides (no more than 25k)

    Conclusion:
    I was all set to buy the Patrol but was amazed by the Scout.
    My friend (who rides another 160mm enduro bike) felt the same way.
    The Scout handles better and responds quicker and suits a more active rider. If your trails/riding is more to run over everything and hold your line, maybe Patrol is the better choice. For me, the Scout was the winner! (... and I was biased against it)
    I'm considering upgrading the fork to 150mm to give me a slightly slacker HA for descents.
    Again, reviews can only go so far and a back to back test proved this

    Good Luck!

  46. #96
    Dnn
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    Thanks Konanim thats good feedback.
    That deserves +1 rep

    I have a few questions I hope you can answer, sorry to bomb you with questions/thoughts:

    How was the bikes setup? What build/weight etc.
    I know that just a few % more or less sag greatly influence the bike feel, so how was the sag setup?

    You mention the scout decents better. Sounds a bit counterintuative for me.

    You say the scout "Manuals and bunnyhops easily"... How about the patrol, does the 5mm longer chainstay effect this?

    Did you guys play with sag/ trail mode on the rear shock? I have the idea that the patrol would do just fine in trail for more pedal/smooth trails with the option to open it fully when things get rowdy. Actually this is what I did on my scout for some time until I realized it just performs so well fully open all the time nomatter the trail, but maybe the patrol is more suited for "trail switch"

    I'm stuck between scout and patrol (I currently own a scout and thinking if I should get a scout ot patrol when they are both in carbon)
    I'm weight 220+ lbs and I feel the rear end could be more smooth jumping/dropping. Even small drops seems abit too harsh for my liking. Not in anyway saying it's hard bottomout landings, just abit noisy and not "Plush feeling"
    Adding too many bands in the shock makes it a bit harsh feeling.

    My trails are not super gnarly at all, but I do seek out the technical features the trails offer and focus on them. I'm just worried the patrol may be too much, but my thinking is that a light carbon patrol could be close to my current scout pedal/climbing-wise but I dont want to loose to much of that playful feel.

    It would be great if people with experience on scout, patrol or both would give their comments. I've read just about everything I could find regarding scout vs patrol and still in doubt.

  47. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dnn View Post
    Thanks Konanim thats good feedback.
    That deserves +1 rep

    I have a few questions I hope you can answer, sorry to bomb you with questions/thoughts:

    How was the bikes setup? What build/weight etc.
    I know that just a few % more or less sag greatly influence the bike feel, so how was the sag setup?

    You mention the scout decents better. Sounds a bit counterintuative for me.

    You say the scout "Manuals and bunnyhops easily"... How about the patrol, does the 5mm longer chainstay effect this?

    Did you guys play with sag/ trail mode on the rear shock? I have the idea that the patrol would do just fine in trail for more pedal/smooth trails with the option to open it fully when things get rowdy. Actually this is what I did on my scout for some time until I realized it just performs so well fully open all the time nomatter the trail, but maybe the patrol is more suited for "trail switch"

    I'm stuck between scout and patrol (I currently own a scout and thinking if I should get a scout ot patrol when they are both in carbon)
    I'm weight 220+ lbs and I feel the rear end could be more smooth jumping/dropping. Even small drops seems abit too harsh for my liking. Not in anyway saying it's hard bottomout landings, just abit noisy and not "Plush feeling"
    Adding too many bands in the shock makes it a bit harsh feeling.

    My trails are not super gnarly at all, but I do seek out the technical features the trails offer and focus on them. I'm just worried the patrol may be too much, but my thinking is that a light carbon patrol could be close to my current scout pedal/climbing-wise but I dont want to loose to much of that playful feel.

    It would be great if people with experience on scout, patrol or both would give their comments. I've read just about everything I could find regarding scout vs patrol and still in doubt.
    No problem:
    I weigh 170lbs.
    Bikes were setup by Transition dealer so even though I didn't check the sag, he checked with my weight and I assume he set it per the recommendations.
    I think that the chainstay length has less to do with the ease of manualing and it's more to do with that you need more movement to compress the longer travel in order to push back up.
    The patrol is plusher when landing for sure but if you land correctly, not that much of a difference on the scout.
    Like I said, I really liked the playful feel of the Scout vs. the Patrol. That was the selling point.

    Think about it this way, if your trails aren't super gnarly and it's just the drops that feel a bit harsh, then why would you sacrifice 90% of the ride quality for the 10% of gnar?
    My thinking was initially: Move to an Enduro bike to keep up with my increasing speeds/ drops etc. but as I started testing I realized that for me at least the ride quality is better with slightly shorter travel because of that playfulness.
    For the remaining 10%, I'll dial in my technique to be smoother (...it'll make me a better rider)
    I've also spoken to a couple of competitive guys (both enduro & DH) and they ride mostly on 140mm bikes . Their take is that people buy what they want and not what they really need. I'll admit it's hard to for me too to accept the fact that I'll be going with less travel than a lot of my friends...

  48. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dnn View Post
    Thanks Konanim thats good feedback.
    That deserves +1 rep

    I have a few questions I hope you can answer, sorry to bomb you with questions/thoughts:

    How was the bikes setup? What build/weight etc.
    I know that just a few % more or less sag greatly influence the bike feel, so how was the sag setup?

    You mention the scout decents better. Sounds a bit counterintuative for me.

    You say the scout "Manuals and bunnyhops easily"... How about the patrol, does the 5mm longer chainstay effect this?

    Did you guys play with sag/ trail mode on the rear shock? I have the idea that the patrol would do just fine in trail for more pedal/smooth trails with the option to open it fully when things get rowdy. Actually this is what I did on my scout for some time until I realized it just performs so well fully open all the time nomatter the trail, but maybe the patrol is more suited for "trail switch"

    I'm stuck between scout and patrol (I currently own a scout and thinking if I should get a scout ot patrol when they are both in carbon)
    I'm weight 220+ lbs and I feel the rear end could be more smooth jumping/dropping. Even small drops seems abit too harsh for my liking. Not in anyway saying it's hard bottomout landings, just abit noisy and not "Plush feeling"
    Adding too many bands in the shock makes it a bit harsh feeling.

    My trails are not super gnarly at all, but I do seek out the technical features the trails offer and focus on them. I'm just worried the patrol may be too much, but my thinking is that a light carbon patrol could be close to my current scout pedal/climbing-wise but I dont want to loose to much of that playful feel.

    It would be great if people with experience on scout, patrol or both would give their comments. I've read just about everything I could find regarding scout vs patrol and still in doubt.
    Invest in a better shock, I now use a DB Inline (other shocks available) and its improved the scout no end.
    Put your phone down and get riding.

  49. #99
    Dnn
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    Quote Originally Posted by Konanim View Post
    I weigh 170lbs.
    Bikes were setup by Transition dealer so even though I didn't check the sag, he checked with my weight and I assume he set it per the recommendations.
    I would never trust a setup made purely based on weight.
    I find that monarch shocks actually vary by quite alot, even on the same bike. In my experience the scout at least is quite sensitive between just a few % sag.
    Not saying this was a problem or anything in your test, just something to consider.
    Very helpful comparison.

    Unfortunately there is no demo events in Denmark.
    Last edited by Dnn; 06-29-2016 at 10:21 AM.

  50. #100
    ptd
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    FWIW, I'm on a Scout, never ridden a Patrol.
    I've got Fox 36 @ 150mm and a -2 degree headset.

    Coming from a 160mm bike, it does what I wanted, now 90% of the ride is better, 10% of gnarly -marginally- worse. On the 160mm it was all a bit un-fun and tame except on the 10% gnarly.
    I miss bombing the 10% gnarly, so I wish I had a carbon Patrol - ha!

    As a fun bike - great
    As a race bike - maybe miss 160mm but my personal times are comparable


    n+1

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