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  1. #1
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    Messed up dish on Revolution rims

    A buddy of mine recently purchased a set of Revolution wheels from Transition and when he got them and put the rear one on he noticed it was too far over to the right of the chainstay and not centered like it should be. So, he gets ahold of Mike and he tells him to send the wheel back so he can warranty it. My buddy sends the wheel back and when he gets the new rear wheel, same sh*t. Anybody ever seen this happen from them? I've ordered 3 different Revolution wheelsets from them and never seen this happen before. Not to bash but, Transition was awful slow at the whole communication thing. All in all it took roughly a month between getting the wheelset and sending the back one in and receiving the new one.

  2. #2
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    what frame was he installing the wheel on?
    The Dropnzone
    Bellingham,Wa
    www.dropnzone.com
    1-888-95 Pin it

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chad_Money
    what frame was he installing the wheel on?
    He installed them on a 08 Spesh Big Hit

    I notice you are from Drop N Zone, I have ordered 3 sets of the same rims from you guys without a problem. I love dealing with you guys

  4. #4
    beautiful jackass
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    I didn't have any trouble with mine.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by one incredible donkey
    I didn't have any trouble with mine.

    Like I said, I never have either so I am wondering why he got 2 bad rear ones.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrible1one3
    Thanks for that link. I have never heard of that before.

  8. #8
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    Np... I randomly went over it a few months ago going through that thread and luckily could find it again when I searched it with google. I am not sure if this applies to you or not but I figured it could possibly help.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BWVDubya
    Thanks for that link. I have never heard of that before.
    Yep, frames do sometimes have alignment issues. Usually the original owner doesn't even know as the builder just dished the wheel to line up. Only real issue is that it makes it hard to swap wheels back and forth since they have to be dished for the frame. I had a SC Bullit with a swingarm that required about 5mm of dish to one side.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    Yep, frames do sometimes have alignment issues. Usually the original owner doesn't even know as the builder just dished the wheel to line up. Only real issue is that it makes it hard to swap wheels back and forth since they have to be dished for the frame. I had a SC Bullit with a swingarm that required about 5mm of dish to one side.
    Thanks for that tid bit. Learn something new everyday

  11. #11
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    Tell your buddy to get a Dirtbag so his wheel will fit
    The Dropnzone
    Bellingham,Wa
    www.dropnzone.com
    1-888-95 Pin it

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chad_Money
    Tell your buddy to get a Dirtbag so his wheel will fit
    Lol. That's what I'm sayin. I just ordered my Dirtbag from you guys. Will be here Wednesday

  13. #13
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    Just to stir the pot:

    I'm guessing no one actually checked the dish of the wheel, right?

    Even if the dish was off, why wouldn't you just adjust it?

  14. #14
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    does the big hit have an asymetrical rear end like the demo 8? If so you always need to dish the wheel to the left. I believe it around 7 or 8 offset but cant remember. Its not the wheels issue, its the frame.

  15. #15
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    does the big hit have an asymetrical rear end like the demo 8? If so you always need to dish the wheel to the left. I believe it around 7 or 8 offset but cant remember. Its not the wheels issue, its the frame.

  16. #16
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    I'm not sure about the rear end. I'm pretty sure it is though

  17. #17
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    See the following from Leelikesbikes:

    "Specialized has been rocking the asymmetrical rear ends on BigHits, Demo 8s and later P.bikes. Compared with a standard-dish wheel, the stock rims are offset six millimeters to the brake side.

    Advantages:

    - You get a “zero-dish” rear wheel. In a standard wheel, the spokes are shorter on the drive side, which makes an uneven and relatively weak triangle. In a zero-dish wheel, the spokes are the same length on both sides. This creates an even, relatively stronger triangle. Isosceles, baby!

    - The other benefit, according to Dr. Brandon Sloan at Specialized, is a better chain line. The cranks on bigger bikes tend to run wide, so moving the cogset outboard helps the chainline.

    Considerations:

    - You can ride a standard wheel in one of these bikes — they have plenty of tire clearance — but it won’t track directly behind your front wheel. I’ve done this out of temporary laziness; it’s funny how you can get used to anything.

    - If you install a new wheel, definitely re-dish it six millimeters to the brake side."



    Have your buddy take the wheel in with the bike to get it redished, it will only cost around $20 or so. I've done this with 2 Demos with good results.
    "Careful. We don't want to learn from this." -- Calvin & Hobbes

  18. #18
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    That is great info. Thanks a ton. You all have been most helpful

  19. #19
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    6mm is quite a bit of adjustment to dish without relacing half of the wheel. I wouldn't recommend it, your spoke tension will be pretty wacked out.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWfreeride
    6mm is quite a bit of adjustment to dish without relacing half of the wheel. I wouldn't recommend it, your spoke tension will be pretty wacked out.
    Yeah, but this is a Specialized. And like all Specialized products it's not important to make it work right, just so long as it won't work at all with anything non-Spec.

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