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  1. #1
    Awesome, not Cool
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    How well do these bikes pedal?

    I've been looking at the Covert model on Bikechecker software and it seems to have, what I think, are great numbers for pedaling efficiency. Chain growth is relatively short at 9mm, global pedal kickback is +1.5 degrees and pedal kickback from frame is -6 degrees. This to me seems quite efficient.

    The better known bikes like Ibis, Specialized, Turner, etc... have numbers like 21mm, +14 degrees, and +6 degrees respectively. This to me means, more kickback and more energy spent fighting that kickback = less efficient.

    I'm an engineer so I do like to analyze data and compare numbers I get on my computer but I know it's not enough to look at numbers, it's best to compare that data with how a bike rides in the real world.

    Disregard weight, looks, materials, etc...

    So, what I'm interested in is how much pedal kickback can you feel on a Transition Covert?
    Does it feel sluggish or snappy?
    Do you fight the pedals when you're at speed, pedaling, on a flat rocky terrain?
    Any descriptions of it's pedaling characteristics welcome...


    Thanks

  2. #2
    jtd
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    After years on a covert I will have to say that I don't feel any remarkable pedal kick back/feedback while pedalling or ripping downhill. Could be that I am used to it... I do/have noticed way more kickback on vpp bikes while coasting through rough stuff though. Some kick bad enough they will slink the cranks backwards at compression.

    I will say honestly that if you want a bike to do flat rocky riding the Covert is not the bike for you. The BB is so low that you will smack pedals constantly. Pedal feedback is the least of your worries. The best way to describe a Covert is that it is a mini-dh bike you can pedal. Definitely not an xc bike, and would be a complete waste to build it as such.

  3. #3
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    I have to strongly disagree on the low BB. My Spitfire is much lower. All the Specialized's I've had in the past (SJ, Enduro) have been lower, pretty sure my new Pivot 5.7c is lower. As long as my fork is at 160mm my Covert (2009 Mk2) is the best bike I've ever had for pedal clearance.

    As far as kickback goes, I'm noticing a little compared to the Pivot. Just a little roughness in the pedals over small lumps. But it's never worried me in the past. There's a little sponginess in acceleration compared to a hardtail but you do have 150mm of travel. It climbs well with or without pro pedal. And I've never noticed the lunging bob you get with an FSR without pro pedal.

    Edit: I don't suppose you have a carbon covert, jtd? I see the specs for these have 0.3 inch less bb height, with the shorter 34 fork.
    Last edited by paulb; 08-21-2012 at 05:10 AM.

  4. #4
    jtd
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    I wish I was rocking the carbon, but for now I am just on an alloy. To be fair though bikes with lower travel, like the spitfire, should have a significantly lower bb proportionally. Saying that, the Enduro is super low. I bet that bike rips....


    Quote Originally Posted by paulb View Post
    I have to strongly disagree on the low BB. My Spitfire is much lower. All the Specialized's I've had in the past (SJ, Enduro) have been lower, pretty sure my new Pivot 5.7c is lower. As long as my fork is at 160mm my Covert (2009 Mk2) is the best bike I've ever had for pedal clearance.

    As far as kickback goes, I'm noticing a little compared to the Pivot. Just a little roughness in the pedals over small lumps. But it's never worried me in the past. There's a little sponginess in acceleration compared to a hardtail but you do have 150mm of travel. It climbs well with or without pro pedal. And I've never noticed the lunging bob you get with an FSR without pro pedal.

    Edit: I don't suppose you have a carbon covert, jtd? I see the specs for these have 0.3 inch less bb height, with the shorter 34 fork.

  5. #5
    EveryDay
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    Transition covert pedaling efficiency

    I'm also an engineer with 25 years of daily riding and a quiver of 7. I'm looking for an all mountain ride and comparing yeti SB66, enduro, norco truax and transition covert. The worst pedal feedback I've ever felt is VPP so those are out. I'm in rural alaska so ability to maintain myself is key. The only bike I can find that allows bearing replacement easily without specific tools is covert. Everything else requires parts that are expensive, in the case of specialized often not even available. I own a TransAM and Transition is straight up the best company there is to work with so that counts. I've got a DH and plenty of XC up to 140 so looking for aggressive and pedalable. Being a single pivot the covert "should" have the same weaknesses as a heckler but the pivot placements as stated by canicallyouguy are perfect and produce better numbers then horst. I also am looking for testimony on pedalbility. I climb 4000 plus with the same reckless abandon as DH and over the course of an all mountain ride we spend 90% of our time climbing so I often ride hardtail and still whomp other riders on DH because they are so tired by the time they get up. I'm holding off on next bike till I ride more kinds. How does covert pedal compared to horst link?

  6. #6
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    Well, I'm not sure if this helps but I just came from a 4" travel superlight with 5' fork and the covert with fox 36 dialed down to 120mm climbs as well as my old bike and with less kickback. Bob is also minimal.

  7. #7
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    The Covert (and all of our trail bikes) are intended to pedal in a vary "neutral" way. Pivots are based around modern 2x10 gearing or 1x10 setups. If you had a triple you might experience very slight feedback in the 22 tooth ring, or slight bob in the 42 tooth, but within the range of 24 teeth to 38 teeth your bike will feel comfortable and normal without any perceivable pedal feedback.

  8. #8
    Deere Rider
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    Pedal behavior on my Covert 29 is great. I use a 24-36 crank with an 11-36 10spd cassette. When I think pedal feedback I look at two things: does pedal power "pull" the suspension into its travel and does the suspension movement "fight" your feet when trying to pedal through rough terrain.

    Just got back from Moab and I was extremely happy with the bike's performance. When I stood to hammer to the top of a slickrock climb the bike moved forward with no suspension compression caused by the pedal power stroke. Also, I felt very comfortable pedaling through reasonably rough terrain (you can't pedal over everything) and never felt like I was "fighting" the suspension movement.

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