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  1. #1
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    Bandit 29 suspension set up guidelines?

    Anybody out there have a general rule of thumb or two when it comes to the suspension set up on the Bandit 29? I go about 180 - 185 lbs of riding weight (my body weight plus a full 10 lb pack). I'm running roughly 160 psi right now. It seems to put me right about 25 - 30% sag. No wallow when climbing and it feels pretty plush. However, on the bigger hits (OMG does this bike like to get air!!) I feel like I'm pretty easily bottoming out the travel.

    So, is there a rule of thumb out there like running, for example, about your body weight in psi, or a general PSI starting point? If I had to err on one side or the other of the plush to firm scale, I'd personally rather err on the firm side since my riding usually involves a rectum-load of climbing.

  2. #2
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    More is better

    You got about 15 pounds on me. I started at 160 psi, increased to about 170. Feels perfect. I love the way this shock is tuned.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RuLz View Post
    You got about 15 pounds on me. I started at 160 psi, increased to about 170. Feels perfect. I love the way this shock is tuned.
    So, does that mean your effective "riding weight" (body weight, full pack, shoes, helmet, etc.) is about 170? Sounds like that means setting body weight as the PSI is a good place to start. Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Transition themselves emailed me and suggested 25-30% sag but I find she bottoms out too easy at 30
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  5. #5
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    I'll play around with the PSI - just didn't want to run it too high or too low. (Every bike seems to have its own sweet spot - my 575 needed well over 200 psi in the RP23, while my Jet prefers around 135 psi in the RP23.) Time to do some experimenting. Thanks!

  6. #6
    RYD W/ FLO
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    Body weight is the perfect starting point for shock pressures on a Bandit 29 WITH the stock tune RP23, IMO. I am the same weight as you, earthpig (170 naked, 185ish R2R) and I run my shock at 170-175psi with propedal on 1 or 2. This nets me ~20% sag (propedal on 0) and ideal trail manners for my style of riding. The o-ring is always pushed passed the Kashima logo after every ride indicating that I am using all of my travel, yet I never feel the bottom. The thing feels like it's glued to the trail through chunky sections, has great small bump compliance, and hardly bobs on the ups.

    FWIW, I ride GJ/Fruita (rocky techgnar) and tend to ride more aggressively than most...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by karatemonkey View Post
    Body weight is the perfect starting point for shock pressures on a Bandit 29 WITH the stock tune RP23, IMO. I am the same weight as you, earthpig (170 naked, 185ish R2R) and I run my shock at 170-175psi with propedal on 1 or 2. This nets me ~20% sag (propedal on 0) and ideal trail manners for my style of riding. The o-ring is always pushed passed the Kashima logo after every ride indicating that I am using all of my travel, yet I never feel the bottom. The thing feels like it's glued to the trail through chunky sections, has great small bump compliance, and hardly bobs on the ups.

    FWIW, I ride GJ/Fruita (rocky techgnar) and tend to ride more aggressively than most...
    hey what rebound setting do you prefer for the rocky trails, and do you flip it open for all of the descents or leave it on 1 or 2?
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  8. #8
    RYD W/ FLO
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    I keep my rebound pretty quick, typically 4-5 clicks from open. With the new RP23 (is it old now that the CTD stuff is available? So glad I got a pre-CTD shock, btw) I usually chose either 1 or 2 depending on the trail I'm riding and leave it there for the duration. I only flip it to 3 when the climbs get obscene or I'm stravaing. I find that the added dampening actually helps the shock/bike maintain it's composure on landings and full compression impacts. Riding at 0, I definitely felt the bottom more frequently. Also, I don't recognize a discernible difference in plushness between 0-1 but the bike does seem to behave better both up and down with that little bit of dampening. Please remember that these are just my observations/preferences, yours most likely will and should differ.

  9. #9
    North Van/Whistler
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    I'm running about 25% sag so a bit firmer than what Transition recommends. That's about body weight for me on the shock (160lbs
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  10. #10
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    I'm running body weight (w/gear) +/- 5psi for the shock, which gives me about 30% sag. I do however feel the bottom when landing 4' drops to small transition so I might do as karatemonkey says and dial in some propedal. I've always been a set-and-forget type of rider but it sounds like it might be time for some tweaking. So far this bike hauls ass, rode a Shinobi for a few months and the suspension both front & back on the B29 feels significantly smoother. The bike feels stout without being sluggish loves to boost off pretty much anything...
    ride, eat, sleep, repeat

  11. #11
    RYD W/ FLO
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    I am interested to see what decreasing the air can volume would do to the bike. Ideally, I would like to run a bit more sag than I currently do but don't want the frequent bottom outs that come with it. I would like to switch to a Monarch Plus and start fiddling with spacers and shims to really get this shred sled dialed! I recently rode most of the Whole Enchilada (Hazard Cty down) and the RP23 was riding really harsh by the time we got to Porc. Need more oil!

  12. #12
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    The RP23 shocks we ship on this bike already have a volume spacer in the air can to account for part of the custom tune. However you could opt for a larger volume spacer (if I recall correctly the next up would be the .6 cubic inch) if you want a more progressive feel. There is an element of rider preference there for sure. The CTD shocks are tuned to match... but the exact compression rate of the shock was very slighly different with Fox's new sleeve/spacer configuration. I think it has a hair more ramp up... but we are talking micro difference.

    For what it is worth I would reccomend 25% sag on this bike. The 30/33% sag is really more of a DH bike thing, for all of our trail bikes I would aim for 25% sag. And yes, I find that I am sitting at about my body weight (without riding gear) for PSI in the shock.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Transition Bikes View Post
    For what it is worth I would reccomend 25% sag on this bike. The 30/33% sag is really more of a DH bike thing, for all of our trail bikes I would aim for 25% sag. And yes, I find that I am sitting at about my body weight (without riding gear) for PSI in the shock.
    Will do - I'll try bumping it up to 175 psi from the current 160. Thanks!

  14. #14
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    New question here.

    How are you guys setting up your forks?

    What fork?
    Terrain?
    Rebound?
    Damping or full plush?
    using full travel?

    I've got a revelation XX, sometimes I adjust the floodgate to imitate compression damping but I'm still trying to find the sweet spot. I've got 18 points of rebound but I find there is barely any difference between 18(fastest) and 6. I ride loose over hard terrain with some fast bumps but then we have some real flowy pump trails.

    I probably use 80% of my fork travel each ride, I'm going to let some air out so it uses just a little more on the biggest drop, but add some more damping.

    Also anybody here with an 140-110 adjustable fork finding the 110 position completely useless? Feels like I'm trying to push through mud when I had switched it on for climbs in the past.
    Last edited by Joel RW; 06-06-2012 at 05:11 AM.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel RW View Post
    Also anybody here with an 140-110 adjustable fork finding the 110 position completely useless? Feels like I'm trying to push through mud when I had switched it on for climbs in the past.

    +1
    I wanted a black fork and the original kit was not available, so I went with the Talas: more money, some more weight, impossible to pedal at 110..... very good showing



    ....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel RW View Post
    How are you guys setting up your forks?

    What fork?
    Terrain?
    Rebound?
    Damping or full plush?
    using full travel?

    I've got a revelation XX, sometimes I adjust the floodgate to imitate compression damping but I'm still trying to find the sweet spot. I've got 18 points of rebound but I find there is barely any difference between 18(fastest) and 6. I ride loose over hard terrain with some fast bumps but then we have some real flowy pump trails.

    I probably use 80% of my fork travel each ride, I'm going to let some air out so it uses just a little more on the biggest drop, but add some more damping.
    Reba RLT Ti (last year's model.) Not terribly impressed so far. My older Reba 29'ers were more plush. I don't like the new "Black Box" XX compression - the fork feels dead, like most Fox forks I've owned. No small bump feel and never full travel. (My Talas 36 I had on my 575 was the same way.)

    I'm more concerned with small bump/high speed feel than the ability to handle big hits and so far this fork isn't great - the shock feels more plush than the fork (maybe because I'm running too little air in the shock.) I'm running equal 120/120 positive/negative with the compression all the way off and the rebound about 3 to 4 clicks from full "fast." I haven't come close to full travel and with equal pos/neg pressure the fork will "suck down" so I won't ever get the full 140mm of travel anyway. Measuring the visible stanchions, the most I could get would be about 135mm and only if the fork compressed all the way down to the crown. I've had Rock Shox forks do this in the past, but never when the pos/neg pressures were equal. If I take all the negative pressure out, the fork extends back to full travel, but with any negative pressure in there it sucks down. I have a couple of other Reba 29's and neither has this issue.

  17. #17
    RYD W/ FLO
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    What fork? Fox 34 Float 140
    Terrain? rocky desert chunk, slow and technical to fast and rough
    Rebound? 6 from full open
    Damping or full plush? 4 clicks LS (no HS adjustment)
    using full travel? Yes/some times, usually when I screw up
    PSI? 60-65

    I love this fork. I have always been a RS guy but this Fox 34 is awesome. Excellent small bump, semi-linear feel thru 3/4 of travel with a bottom out resistant ramp up at the end. Gotta push it HARD to use all the travel (step downs, drops to crappy trannies) and it would seem that the fatter stanchions do make a difference.
    Last edited by karatemonkey; 06-06-2012 at 08:57 AM.

  18. #18
    North Van/Whistler
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    I'm basically Karatemonkey's twin except I have a white Fox Float 34 and 5 clicks of rebound from full open
    Locals' Guide to North Shore Rides http://mtbtrails.ca/

  19. #19
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    Increased the psi to 175 in the shock last night - just as good small bump compliance, but with little to no bottoming out on bigger hits. Even better, my fork performed better than it ever has - not sure if it just broke in or what.

    The combination of the two led to one of my best rides in as long as I can remember. I have to say that in the 16+ years I've been mountain biking I've owned a TON of mountain bikes of all shapes, sizes, frame materials, travel, and geometry and so far the B29 is the best overall bike I've ever ridden. I just BEGS to go fast, both up and down. Climbs as well as any XC bike I've ever ridden - even lighter ones I've owned - and is by far the most fun bike I've ever had when going downhill. Looking at the geometry numbers and suspension design, I don't get how the bike performs as it does. I expected it to be slow, heavy and ponderous. Instead, it's light, fast, snappy and manouverable as something with a wheel base an inch or two shorter. It eats up small bumps and large ones like they arent' there. I was grinning like an idiot riding down our local "signature" trail which is alternately fast, smooth and straight, tight and curvy and rocky. Never been able to ride down it as fast as I did. Didn't even have to drop my saddle. I haven't had so much fun on a bike in years. I'm not even sure if I can reach the limits of this bike's performance without testing and exceeding my own.

    Transition - thank you!!!

  20. #20
    RYD W/ FLO
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig View Post
    Increased the psi to 175 in the shock last night - just as good small bump compliance, but with little to no bottoming out on bigger hits. Even better, my fork performed better than it ever has - not sure if it just broke in or what.

    The combination of the two led to one of my best rides in as long as I can remember. I have to say that in the 16+ years I've been mountain biking I've owned a TON of mountain bikes of all shapes, sizes, frame materials, travel, and geometry and so far the B29 is the best overall bike I've ever ridden. I just BEGS to go fast, both up and down. Climbs as well as any XC bike I've ever ridden - even lighter ones I've owned - and is by far the most fun bike I've ever had when going downhill. Looking at the geometry numbers and suspension design, I don't get how the bike performs as it does. I expected it to be slow, heavy and ponderous. Instead, it's light, fast, snappy and manouverable as something with a wheel base an inch or two shorter. It eats up small bumps and large ones like they arent' there. I was grinning like an idiot riding down our local "signature" trail which is alternately fast, smooth and straight, tight and curvy and rocky. Never been able to ride down it as fast as I did. Didn't even have to drop my saddle. I haven't had so much fun on a bike in years. I'm not even sure if I can reach the limits of this bike's performance without testing and exceeding my own.

    Transition - thank you!!!
    You are welcome! Glad you are stoked.

  22. #22
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    Sorry for resurrecting an couple month old thread but I figured it would be best to piggyback.

    I've had my Bandit for a few months now and every time I ride I add a little more pressure in the RP23 that came with my frame to keep it from bottoming out. It bottoms out every time I go out. I weigh 150 and have progressed from 150psi to just shy of 200psi last Sunday and it still bottomed out. I have the propedal set to open. Should i flip it on even on downhills? I was thinking propedal was mainly for uphills. Any other suggestions?

  23. #23
    EvilRider
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    ... and if we just ... Redundant Rant ......

    #19 Earthpig hit the nail on the head !!! Ive had mine about five months and love it. Two rides ago I upped the pressure in the rear shock 5psi. I run 203lbs full pack and clothed and had been running about 192 psi with great results (after adding little by little...) however as I keep pushing faster and harder the square edged hits were killing the otherwise plush feel. It was a harsh transition into "Boostvalve" territory. By running it up to 198psi @ (-5lbs under riding weight) it is a smooth transition throughout the entire travel and square edge hits and drops to flat are smooth as S#@!T now !!! I took about -2psi out of the fork @67psi now and five clicks of damping and you can lay over the front into highspeed turnswith minimal breaking ! It is an amazing difference, feels like a custom tune was performed I'm stunned !!! So what did I give up ? Small bump compliancy ??? First small root, rock etc is firm under the rear end then smooths out like butter over successive hits with no packdown or harsh rebound ... Amazing, couldnt be happier

  24. #24
    EvilRider
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    Good job! #22 Rawdoggie

    What size frame and whats the Boostvalve tune on the shock ?? I would start with running -5lbs under your fully dressed weight; pack, helmet, pads, water etc etc. and run it with propedal open and set to "1" as most of us have found. It gives the rear a little platform and seems to help it transition into the mid travel nicely. I have found when the rear shock is over-pressurized or over-propedalled it blows through its travel on big or square edged hits only. What are you running for air pressure in the fork ? at 205 I'm only running 67psi in the front with 5 clicks of damping, I suspect you're running too much pressure in the fork and making the rear do all the work thus blowing through all of your rear travel. Over pressurized air suspension is the MOST common reason for poor performance in full sussers; google it ! Good luck hope it helps, post your findings/results for us

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyD442 View Post
    What size frame and whats the Boostvalve tune on the shock ?? I would start with running -5lbs under your fully dressed weight; pack, helmet, pads, water etc etc. and run it with propedal open and set to "1" as most of us have found.
    by "propedal open" do you mean with propedal ON or leaving the shock wide open (propedal off)? I figure it's the first since I didn't think the propedal setting is relevent if the lever is switched to wide-open but I may be wrong...thanks
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