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  1. #1
    I wreck alot
    Reputation: SoWal_MTBer's Avatar
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    Working with Pine?

    I'm looking to build some trail features using some fresh Shortleaf Pines taken out by a recent storm. Does anyone have experience working with Shortleaf Pine or a similar species?

    I'm interested primarily in how strong the wood is, it's durability and ease to work with.

  2. #2
    Single Speed Junkie
    Reputation: crux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoWal_MTBer View Post
    I'm looking to build some trail features using some fresh Shortleaf Pines taken out by a recent storm. Does anyone have experience working with Shortleaf Pine or a similar species?

    I'm interested primarily in how strong the wood is, it's durability and ease to work with.
    No direct experience with Shortleaf Pines, but have worked with pines and blow down in the past. Since the wood is recent you will have a pretty good chance of having good material to work with. If it is for berms and ramps you would be fine. Now if your going after elevated structures then I would take careful look at what you have and how solid you can build a structure. Last thing I would want is something failing while another rider is trying it out.

    Pines are pretty easy to work with as they are a soft wood. Durability is going to vary depending if the wood is wet or not. Quickest means of drying out a piece is in stripping the bark off of it using a draw knife.

    Best of luck

  3. #3
    Stiff yet compliant
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    Pine is sufficiently strong for most things and easy to work with. In most cases it rots fairly quickly. I would not use it for anything you expect to last a long time or if failure of a structure while it is being used would be dangerous.

  4. #4
    FloridaKeys Fishing Guide
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    The biggest problem with wood features is that if the wood is allowed to stay wet/damp it will obviously rot faster than when the sun is allowed to dry it out. In other words make sure that you either trim away the vegetation above and around it to allow some type of drying and ventilation action, or build these features out in the open when/if possible.
    The Mtb park I ride in is going to address this issue soon on all the wood features since some of them are getting spongy in places. Our swampy climate doesn't help either of course..
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

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