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  1. #1
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    Reputation: LarryFahn's Avatar
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    Traction on slick rocks?

    I thought of this idea the other day and was wondering what you guys thought.

    We have plenty of Flagstone here in NE PA and as soon as a drop of water hits it it's like riding on ice. I put in a new trail called The View and there was this natural rock section that needed to be included. After about 6-8hrs of work, we have a 40'+ section of Flagstone road. Well, we found out how it rides wet the other day! I thought of a solution and was wanting some feedback to this idea.

    I want to clean the rock off with some bleach and a brush. Being careful not to spill any on the ground I'd use a spray bottle. The brush would be used to scrub off the moss and algie.

    Let it dry for an hour or so and come back with some (A)Dupli-Color truck bed liner that you spray on. I'd put down small sections where the traction is needed most. This way the rocks aren't all black and uniform.

    Or (B) Rubberizer spray used for the undercarrage of vehicles. Rubber on rubber is pretty slip-resistant.

    What do you guys think? I'm going to give it a shot and see if it works. I think this is an outside-the-box experiment that might lead to something for future trailbuilding.

    Ttyl, Fahn

  2. #2
    backwoods and backwards
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
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    Sounds like a bad idea to me. On rock sections I go wire brush with no chemicals to prep. After that let time and tires finish the job. It's up to the rider to make sure their bike is set up to the task. I happily push super slow kenda stickies all day so I don't wipe on that 40' section of rock, or I walk.

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  3. #3
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    rubberized spray doesnt dry.. ever. its tacky and messy and hideous, the first ride over it would wipe it 90% off. its really just for underbody coating to keep rust off.

    you want paint on safety grip stuff. you can buy a gallon of it at home depot for pretty cheap, its specifically for giving traction to loose surfaces, dries hard and is quite durable. chemical and water resistant too.

    but yeah.. i dont think smearing chemicals all over a natural trail feature sounds like such a great idea.. both environmentally, and just for the sake of riding natural trails.

  4. #4
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    I personally think it's a horrible idea to use any chemicals or adhesive spray on a trail, unless it's a manmade object such as a bridge. Cleaning the rocks with a wire brush would be fine, but even the careful use of a cleaner could be disasterous to the environment. I suggest an alternate route and/or signs to warn riders.

    FWIW, only tires with very soft / tacky compounds and lots of surface area do well on wet rocks & roots.

  5. #5
    ups and downs
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    You might try texturing the rock surface similar to what's done with logs with the chainsaw crosscuts. Could be done with a diamond blade concrete saw, but it sure would take some time (and tool rental costs).

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MOJO K
    Sounds like a bad idea to me. On rock sections I go wire brush with no chemicals to prep. After that let time and tires finish the job. It's up to the rider to make sure their bike is set up to the task. I happily push super slow kenda stickies all day so I don't wipe on that 40' section of rock, or I walk
    I agree 100%.

  7. #7
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    id say wire brush to scrape away, and then the grippy roll on anti-slip would do the trick, but just dont go overboard, just mainly a dab here and there on the main line of the feature

  8. #8
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    Maybe the sharp end of a pick will give the rock some texture and all the chips left over can add some traction?

  9. #9
    sgabyenom e
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    It would be a travesty to attempt to improve mother nature so it was 'easier' for you to ride when it's wet.

    Buy sticky tires.
    Ride it when it's dry.
    Build a walk around for people who do not wish to attempt it rather than give them false hope/impression for riding it with your modifications.
    Don't pollute the environment and other people's bikes/wilderness experience with chemicals or modifications you see fit.

    Better yet: PRACTICE and then ride it as is and amaze yourself with what you can do if you just try.

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