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  1. #1
    Justin Vander Pol
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    Suppliers of MacLeods?

    Can you guys list up places to purchase MacLeods? I had a list a while ago, but can't find it. I'm looking for good priced MacLeods without bolts on the bottom of the blade.

    Here's two big suppliers with lots of products, but only FS-style bolted MacLoeds. They both have Corona brand McLeods for about $50.
    http://www.forestry-suppliers.com
    http://benmeadows.com

    Thanks,
    Justin

  2. #2
    beer thief
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  3. #3
    Justin Vander Pol
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    Quote Originally Posted by radair
    Cool, thanks.

  4. #4
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    here's another good one, maybe start at the last page and work backwards.

    http://bb.nsmb.com/showthread.php?t=115762

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by juice
    Can you guys list up places to purchase MacLeods? I had a list a while ago, but can't find it. I'm looking for good priced MacLeods without bolts on the bottom of the blade.

    Here's two big suppliers with lots of products, but only FS-style bolted MacLoeds. They both have Corona brand McLeods for about $50.
    http://www.forestry-suppliers.com
    http://benmeadows.com

    Thanks,
    Justin
    I prefer the heavier "bolted" McLeods. Much easier to work with and VERY sturdy. I have been using one of these for around ten years.
    http://www.terratech.net/product.asp?specific=jqmoiqr4

    I know IMBA says the boltless models are better for compacting soil but I find it is a non-issue. For me using the light weight boltless McLeod is like trying to peel a potato with a plastic picnic knife.
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  6. #6
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    Does anyone use a Rhino outside of Indiana? It is a much better tool to bench cut singletrack. McLeods seem too light to get much done except for raking.

  7. #7
    featherweight clydesdale
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    I prefer the heavier "bolted" McLeods. Much easier to work with and VERY sturdy. I have been using one of these for around ten years.
    http://www.terratech.net/product.asp?specific=jqmoiqr4

    I know IMBA says the boltless models are better for compacting soil but I find it is a non-issue. For me using the light weight boltless McLeod is like trying to peel a potato with a plastic picnic knife.
    I think weight has more to do w/ the thickness of the metal rather than bolt vs no bolt.

    Of the options today, I like the Nupla McLeods, cause they're cheap, durable, and YELLOW. The heads get a little loose which is annoying from a quality standpoint, but doesn't impact performance. An extra screw or two takes care of that.

    Yellow = hard to get lost...

    I've had poor luck with Corona (easy broke blade from shaft) and Lamberton (the handle delaminated then broke). Also, the closely spaced teeth of the Lamberton clog up easily w/ leaf litter and duff.

  8. #8
    zrm
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr
    Does anyone use a Rhino outside of Indiana? It is a much better tool to bench cut singletrack. McLeods seem too light to get much done except for raking.
    Well, I don't use a McCloed to bench cut, that's for the pulaski.

  9. #9
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm
    Well, I don't use a McCloed to bench cut, that's for the pulaski.
    Or a hazel hoe. It really depends on the soil type and conditions. For harder soil the hazel hoe or pulaski are needed to loosen the ground. When it is softer the McLeod works well and faster. Much easier to move masses of loose dirt with, too.

    Several of the DoD crew in Eugene use "Terra Hoes" (from Terra Tech but not on their web site) which are similar to the Rhino but modular, stouter and with a curved blade.
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  10. #10
    Justin Vander Pol
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr
    Does anyone use a Rhino outside of Indiana? It is a much better tool to bench cut singletrack. McLeods seem too light to get much done except for raking.
    We've recently started using something similar - the Rogue 60a - a few in our crew call it a "McLaski". It's cheap ($35) and heavy duty. Seems to be a much better all-around tool than a Pulaski with the wider blade. I'm 6'2", so I wish it had a longer handle. So a basic tool stash for us has some of each - shovels, Pulaskis, McLeods and "McLaskis".

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm
    Well, I don't use a McCloed to bench cut, that's for the pulaski.
    Really? I'm always shocked when any experienced trail builder says they use a pulaski for work that is better done with a pick mattock.

    - The grubbing end of a pulaski is maybe 60% of the width of the mattock.

    - The handle of a mattock has ten times the life span of the pulaski handle.

    - Pulaski heads come loose and rarely can you get them tightened up again.

    - The pulaski handle is shorter and more difficult and less safe to swing.

    - A pick mattock handle can be replaced with another $12 handle, and the heads can also be replaced.

    - The handle on a pulaski is not strong enough to allow users to pry rocks out of the ground with the grub end. It will loosen the head of the tool or crack the handle.

    - Forest Service tool graveyards are full of broken pulaski's.

    - Most Forest Service Districts don't hand out pulaski's on volunteer events, unless it is for an experienced worker who plans to use it to cut trees or tree roots. They just come back with broken handles.

    - A well maintained pick mattock can do the job of a pulaski (including cutting roots),a sledge hammer, a McLeod and a rock bar. I've had three people pry a 500 pound rock out of the ground using just pick mattocks.

    - A pick mattock breaks down to easily fit on a backpack or in a B.O.B. trailer.

    - A pick mattock weighs almost double what a pulaski weighs. Greater head weight means better efficiency digging, deeper, wider cuts.

    - The pick on a pick mattock can split rocks or chip off pedal catching high spots on rocks.

    - Pick Mattocks cost about half of what a Pulaski costs.




    My wife bought me a pick mattock for my birthday in 1996. It is still in service today. It is a wonder tool. We excavated 400 wheel barrows of soil from our back yard to build a new patio, using a pick mattock, shovel and wheel barrow. It easily cut into the hard ground, broke apart concrete footings, cut tree roots and some buried cables (oops), and pried out hundreds of large rocks.

    Sorry to ramble on but, as you can see, I love working with pick mattocks (hickory handles only).
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  12. #12
    Justin Vander Pol
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    Quote Originally Posted by juice
    We've recently started using something similar - the Rogue 60a - a few in our crew call it a "McLaski". It's cheap ($35) and heavy duty. Seems to be a much better all-around tool than a Pulaski with the wider blade. I'm 6'2", so I wish it had a longer handle. So a basic tool stash for us has some of each - shovels, Pulaskis, McLeods and "McLaskis".
    Forgot to post the linky. Here it is:
    http://www.wtv-zone.com/Phyllis/larry9.html

  13. #13
    I build my own.
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    The specialized tools like the Mcleod and Rogue become very expensive when you have to import them to Canada. I'd say it was worth the cost.

    A pick mattock is a great tool and Prodigal's points are all valid but if I had to choose between a pick mattock and a Pulaski (I have to pack light because I'm walking a long way) the Pulaski wins. I need the axe for roots and logs and it's a lot lighter to carry.

    You do have to be careful not to break it and it's probably not a good idea to loan it out to volunteers.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr
    Does anyone use a Rhino outside of Indiana? It is a much better tool to bench cut singletrack. McLeods seem too light to get much done except for raking.
    We are big fans of the Rhino in Wilkesboro, NC for work on the Kerr Scott Trails. They work well in the soil here. not the best for rocks obviously, but that blade makes quick work of most roots in the top layer of dirt and to me (and my bad back) it is a more superior benching tool than pulaskis, mattocks, adze hoes, Mcleods and anything else I've tried. Not the best for broadcasting; Usually, we keep a good lopping tool and an axe close by for some bigger roots and have someone follow to drag with a Mcleod. We usually move fast with this system.

    The Mcleod though is a versatile tool that we couldn't do without. Aside from dragging and finishing the outslope, we use these to shape and tamp the MANY berms on our trails.

    Happy Building!

  15. #15
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    nice circle of death

    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr
    Does anyone use a Rhino outside of Indiana? It is a much better tool to bench cut singletrack. McLeods seem too light to get much done except for raking.
    Here in Ohio (CAMBA) we use tons of Rhinos. I do 90% of my work with just a Rhino and a Pulaski. Rhino for most stuff and the Pulaski for anything that is too tough.

    Those Rogue tools that have a wide blade on one side and the pick on the other end look promising and I might need to try one for those days when I can only carry one tool. Just need to decide which one.
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  17. #17
    Off the back...
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooldaddy
    nice circle of death
    I was thinking the EXACT same thing...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkrobe
    I was thinking the EXACT same thing...
    Same here. I value my eyes, toes and teeth way too much to work in such a tight group.
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  19. #19
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    Terra Hoe

    For benching and moving a lot of dirt, the Terra Hoe cannot be beat. It will cut roots as well as an axe, peel logs, and skim off high spots. It is not good if there are a lot of rocks, but in our area that is not a problem. For me the Mcleod does not do anything well, but does ok on a few things. I usually carry the Terra Hoe and a heavy duty garden rake.

    I recently bought a ProHoe Rogue hoe. It is not as good as the Terra Hoe for benching and moving dirt, but it is very good at scraping high spots and sculpting trails. The Prohoe does have some longer handles available.

    Keep on digging.

    hankhank
    If you can think of nothing nice to say, it is time for trail work. -George Terror Hoe

  20. #20
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    A guy in our club actually built his own. We looked at the high purchase+shipping price and got a little turned off.

    The ones he built we call "McEberhardts". The head is built up from old car leaf springs! We have a commercially available one and it seemed pretty flimsy for the rocky terrain we have here. These we have now are heavier, and you can swing it a little more like a Mattock.

    I'll post a pic later. I tried getting John to consider building some to sell or review with other trailbuilders.

  21. #21
    Builder of Trails
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son
    Really? I'm always shocked when any experienced trail builder says they use a pulaski for work that is better done with a pick mattock.

    - The grubbing end of a pulaski is...
    I build trail daily for a living, and when I'm not using a machine for the work, I pick up a pulaski. Granted, if it's rocky, and it is in central Texas, I opt for a pick mattock. But I'd much rather swing something repeatedly that is 20% to 25% lighter over the pick for the hundreds, if not thousands, of swings I take building trail with a pulaski.

    And I've never seen a pick mattock that has a width 60% more than a pulaski. That must be one big pick! I certainly would wear out easily if I had to swing that!

    I think what it boils down to is, to quote Bugs Bunny, "To each his own, I always say."

    BTW, I just received five new Zac Mcleods today from UPS.

    D
    Last edited by dburatti; 12-23-2008 at 07:40 AM.

  22. #22
    Builder of Trails
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guitarswheelies
    A guy in our club actually built his own. We looked at the high purchase+shipping price and got a little turned off.
    A friend of mine who doesn't build trail built five for me. Instead of using the thickness of metal I requested, he used 1/8th" cold rolled steel and used a water jet to cut the tines. They...beefy, to put it nicely. I've had them for over three years now and just received some Zacs in the mail.

    D

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