Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fully's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    169

    Revenue for trailbuilding clubs?

    Beyond dues and grants income, I'm wondering what other trail building orgs (IMBA affiliated or otherwise) have done to get serious cash (and materials) rounded up...

    Races? Fundraisers? Sponsorships?

    All strategic and tactical ideas welcome!

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Just roll it......
    Reputation: ebxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,471
    Mt. bike movie premiers can bring in some good revenues. One of our clubs just put on the NWD 9 premier and ended up making some decent cash out of it.

    Also, something to consider, my wife put on the "Roam" premier in Seattle a couple of years ago.....her employer matches her charitatble donations and she ended up donating over $2k to Colonnade bike park in Seattle.

    Cheers,
    EB

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BRKNSPOKE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    212
    The SORBA-CSRA chapter but on a ride called the 49'er last year to raise money for FATS ( Forks Area Trail System ) For a $20.00 donation you got a map and SAG support for a 49 mile ride with a mix of singletrack, gravel, and some paved road's. They raised a good bit of money for FATS from this ride, and it was alot of fun.
    The way we ride today shapes mountain bike trail access tomorrow. -IMBA

  4. #4
    JmZ
    JmZ is offline
    Reformed Lurker
    Reputation: JmZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,015
    Quote Originally Posted by fully
    Beyond dues and grants income, I'm wondering what other trail building orgs (IMBA affiliated or otherwise) have done to get serious cash (and materials) rounded up...

    Races? Fundraisers? Sponsorships?

    All strategic and tactical ideas welcome!

    Thanks in advance!
    Dues and grants are a good starting point.

    Other fundraisers I've seen are:
    Selling stuff - shirts/hats/socks/jersey/heaset caps.
    Poker runs/time trials/races
    Festivals & organized rides.
    Swap meets
    Bike Raffle (check your local laws)

    Seen most of 'em from NIMBA and HMBA. Most are worth a few hundred to a few thousand depending on turnout and logistics. Some of the rides/festivals are as much about building community and awareness as they are about raising a few bucks.

    Good luck,

    JmZ
    JmZ

    From one flat land to another.

    Advocate as if your ride depends on it...

  5. #5
    featherweight clydesdale
    Reputation: Fattirewilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,356
    1) Like many small cities, we have a "Friday's After 5" venue where bands play, people come out, pay money, and drink beer. Local non profits volunteer and run the beer tents. They "pay" our club something like $8 per hour per volunteer. Works good, a free beer, also good.

    2) We don't affiliate with a specific bike shop. We've approached ALL our local bike shops and they support us by purchasing banners on our website.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ricks_smbc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by fully
    Beyond dues and grants income, I'm wondering what other trail building orgs (IMBA affiliated or otherwise) have done to get serious cash (and materials) rounded up...

    Races? Fundraisers? Sponsorships?

    All strategic and tactical ideas welcome!

    Thanks in advance!
    First, I think you are asking the right question. I would ask you what you are thinking in regards to what you need the money for? How much? What's the vision?

    I believe that for mtn biking to create IMBA ride centers or for that matter to maintain any significant trail networks, we will need to get to a position of paid staff.

    I think that all the responses so far are valuable and will certainly help build bank accounts as well as community. But for paid staff, you will need to go beyond these options.

    I am in northern vermont and the kingdom trails is a great example of a success story. I can't say for sure how they are funded, but trail access fees are part of it. Could you ride there without paying, probably, but riders are pleased to pay due to the quality of the 'product.'

    I have been lobbying our local community and asking for a line item in the town budget. It has been growing and coincidently, yesterday they stepped up for the largest amount yet. I happen to live in a resort community, so it is a little easier sell than someone in a more standard setting.

  7. #7
    I should be out riding
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    940
    Good topic.

    Here in Seattle, the historical revenue source has been dues and contributions (having 501(c)(3) status has helped a lot). Fees from beginner mtn bike courses have helped, and bene pretty consistent over the years. Grants from both corp and gov't sources have really increased the past few years, but most are related to specific projects and have limitations on how they can be used. Events can be good, but the $ is usually not as significant if you consider the volunteer resources they consume. Though if you have the resources they're great, and of course in addition to raising $ you've put on a good event, so it's a win win. The Colonnade project in Seattle sold rocks for 200 and 300 that you could have your name or whatever engraved on, and I think I recall seeing a velodrome project in Boise doing something similar with a $1K pricetag.

    The biggest thing for paid staff is a large base to draw from. A 30 person club in a small town will have a tough time, even in Seattle with a large population base it's not easy.

    Edit:

    Another thought, if you're curious how other bike organization or local hiker organizations are funded, and they're 501(c)(3) org's, check out guidestar.org and you can check out their 990's online. IMBA's is up there too if you're curious about their finances.

  8. #8
    IMBA Canada
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    845
    Rick... Kingdom Trails sells "membership"... daily membership or annual membership... They're riding a thin line between "buiseness" and "trail association group"... But it gets them the revenue to get an executive director...

    Fellowship of the wheel were able to get 2 part-time trailbuilder... I don't know how they did it... Is SMBC going the same way? Do you need as much advocacy when you have VMBA to support you? Or you have need for trailbuilders on private (and allowed) land?

    It's really a tough situation for mountain biking... But we're getting there!
    ADSVMQ :: Quebec mountain bike trail advocacy group www.ADSVMQ.org

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ricks_smbc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    61
    Kingdom also brings in a lot of $$ via their land trust initiatives. It is good to see it works and funds 4 or 5 trail builders. They did some great work last year.

    Fellowship did an awesome event at the VYCC (Vt Youth Conservation Corps) barn. They had bands, food and raffles. They raised a very good amount of money in one night. People were very generous!

    We are looking to build out a pretty large network and it is beyond the scope of volunteers. It will be a VMBA project, but we have a very big interest since a lot of it runs through town. Stowe ponied up last night with a substantial commitment.

    Acree: Yes, we are a 501 c3. I looked at the Guide Star sight but am not real sure what value it gives the local club. Say a little more about Guide Star.

    Some question I have: Are user fees viable? And what are the implications with insurance?

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    158
    In Washington State, there are grant programs that allocate a percentage of gas tax money to recreation. (Long story--the idea is that for gas burned on roads not maintained by DOT, the gas tax income should not go to DOT but go back to the activities that motivated people to drive on forest roads--i.e. ATV use and trail-based recreation.)

    The money is available only to public agencies (USFS, state land management deptmt, counties, etc.) but user groups regularly team up with public agencies to put together grant proposals that they execute together. The volunteer labor put in by the user group is valued by the hour and considered a matching amount that strengthens the grant application.

    No idea if this construction exists in other states.

    I recommend looking at better established groups for other activities (i.e. hiker groups?) and see where they're getting funding.

    There's also increasing grant money available for youth sports facilities--charitable foundations are worried about child obesity.

  11. #11
    I should be out riding
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    940
    Quote Originally Posted by roundnround
    In Washington State, there are grant programs that allocate a percentage of gas tax money to recreation. (Long story--the idea is that for gas burned on roads not maintained by DOT, the gas tax income should not go to DOT but go back to the activities that motivated people to drive on forest roads--i.e. ATV use and trail-based recreation.)

    The money is available only to public agencies (USFS, state land management deptmt, counties, etc.) but user groups regularly team up with public agencies to put together grant proposals that they execute together. The volunteer labor put in by the user group is valued by the hour and considered a matching amount that strengthens the grant application.

    No idea if this construction exists in other states.

    I recommend looking at better established groups for other activities (i.e. hiker groups?) and see where they're getting funding.

    There's also increasing grant money available for youth sports facilities--charitable foundations are worried about child obesity.
    OR has something similar. In WA, part of the reason so much NOVA $ is available for nonmotorized trails is because of the WTA suing and causing problems (their normal 'hate moto' practices). I don't think anything has happened like that in OR, so the funds may be mostly targeted toward moto trails and facilities. I even recall seeing a private, for profit MX track getting some of the funds in OR, using the argument that all the mx bikes had paid gas tax. No idea about other states though.

  12. #12
    I should be out riding
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    940
    Quote Originally Posted by ricks_smbc
    Kingdom also brings in a lot of $$ via their land trust initiatives. It is good to see it works and funds 4 or 5 trail builders. They did some great work last year.

    Fellowship did an awesome event at the VYCC (Vt Youth Conservation Corps) barn. They had bands, food and raffles. They raised a very good amount of money in one night. People were very generous!

    We are looking to build out a pretty large network and it is beyond the scope of volunteers. It will be a VMBA project, but we have a very big interest since a lot of it runs through town. Stowe ponied up last night with a substantial commitment.

    Acree: Yes, we are a 501 c3. I looked at the Guide Star sight but am not real sure what value it gives the local club. Say a little more about Guide Star.

    Some question I have: Are user fees viable? And what are the implications with insurance?

    Guidestar markets themselves as providing lots of value to clubs by having information about you available to potential donors who might be viewing Guidestar. We've haven't seen any benefit from that. But, it's free to fill out the data, or at least it used to be. I really only find it useful for obtaining a copy of the tax return of any 501(c)(3) that's out there. Nice to be able to pull up the WTA (WA hiking group), Backcountry Horsemen, IMBA, etc. to see what their finances look like relative to ours.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ricks_smbc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by roundnround
    In Washington State, there are grant programs that allocate a percentage of gas tax money to recreation. (Long story--the idea is that for gas burned on roads not maintained by DOT, the gas tax income should not go to DOT but go back to the activities that motivated people to drive on forest roads--i.e. ATV use and trail-based recreation.)

    No idea if this construction exists in other states.
    We have a similar program in Vermont. The majority of the money goes to the snow mobilers. I have always thought that we should be able to tap into more of that fund.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    51
    Some of the clubs here in Texas have worked with the local grocery stores to get special cards that give a percentage of your grocery purchase directly to the club. Also, Sweet Tomatoe's restaurant chain will donate part of the revenue if you host a meeting at their locations.
    Texas based trail builders: www.sstrails.com

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    571
    Minnesota Off Road Cyclists puts on two races a year as fund raisers. One is a race in the Minnesota race series (MNSCS) and the other is a 24 hour race. Both are a lot of work, but we generally get a good amount of money out of them. We also get a lot of sponsorship $ and swag for the races which helps a lot.
    =========================================
    Minnesota Off Road Cyclists www.morcmtb.org

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •