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  1. #1
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    Recommendation on Gloves?

    I'm working with a lot of granite and going through gloves like crazy as we're doing a lot of rock armoring and reinforcing our benches with a lot of rock. Does anyone have any suggestions on gloves that last longer than 20-30 hours of use?

  2. #2
    JDM
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    What are you using now?

    I've seen masons in gloves like these:Name:  6350_L.jpg
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  3. #3
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    We've tried everything from the cheap leather gloves at Home Depot to nicer leather gloves at HD and even some heavier duty leather gloves from Costco which turn your hands orange once they get wet. Maybe it's time to check out masonry gloves or gloves designed for handling sheet metal. Just thought I'd ask before wasting more money on useless gloves.

  4. #4
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    The only thing we have found with any durability is leather riggers gloves. Goat skin is good - softer, but 20-30 hours of work is a huge ask for any glove. I get 12-15 hours out of good gloves. If there's mud, then leather is hopeless - slippery and it hardens and shrinks making it hard to look at next dig day, although you can hose and wringe them out at times. Problem with all gloves is that they all have weak points that tear, wear. allow thorn penetration or bunch up and abrade. All get grit inside and blisters follow. Face it; this game sucks for your hands and wallet.

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    Find gloves with the seams on the inside. They might not be as comfortable, but they will last longer.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, I may be generous saying that my gloves are lasting 20-30 hours. I found some kevlar gloves for sheet metal workers online, but have a feeling their protection from cutting won't do much to prevent wear from abrasion. Thanks for the tips.

  7. #7
    Off the back...
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    Quote Originally Posted by mealsonwheels View Post
    Yeah, I may be generous saying that my gloves are lasting 20-30 hours. I found some kevlar gloves for sheet metal workers online, but have a feeling their protection from cutting won't do much to prevent wear from abrasion. Thanks for the tips.
    I have found that kevlar-palmed gloves are very resistant to abrasion. I had some Race Face gloves that actually wore through the grips on both my road bike and mountain bike over two years before the seams started going. There was virtually no wear on the Kevlar palm.

  8. #8
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    I had really good luck with Iron Clad gloves when I was doing landscape work for a living.

  9. #9
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    Great suggestion Cotharyus. These look like they could work RANCHWORX®

  10. #10
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by mealsonwheels View Post
    Great suggestion Cotharyus. These look like they could work RANCHWORX®
    You want these kind...

    Grease Monkey X-Large Winter Gorilla Grip Glove-25154 at The Home Depot
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  11. #11
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    bsieb, I like the price but will they last? Have you used those while doing a lot of work with stone?

  12. #12
    saddlemeat
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    The "rubber" coated knit gloves are the only ones that stand up to really rough stone for very long. Just try 'em, you'll like 'em.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  13. #13
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    These have been my favorite so far and I've tried a bunch of different gloves. Soft and durable. Not a ton of dexterity for fine tasks but great for most trail tasks.

    Kinco 1917 Unlined Grain Pigskin Leather Glove, Work, Medium, Palomino (Pack of 6 Pairs): Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    The "rubber" coated knit gloves are the only ones that stand up to really rough stone for very long. Just try 'em, you'll like 'em.
    +1 on this. I have used several different kinds of gloves while working, we landscape and I handle anything from thorny plants to rocks for building waterfalls to pavers for patios.

    Pavers, are the worst, I put a hole in a new pair of leather gloves after 2 hours of working with them, when leather gets wet, it looses its durability, and pavers are cut apart by water-jets when they are made, which leaves a really nice saw-tooth edge on them. That with the pavers being wet from the morning dew destroyed those leather gloves.

    The leather gloves cost like $20, and it would get expensive to keep replacing them, they were pretty heavy too. But the knit gloves with rubber spray on them work great, get the heaviest pair you can find. I used 1 pair of them for 2 months of work and although they are now getting torn up, they cost about $4-6 a pair, plus, they are amazingly grippy.

    But look at the local hardware store, menards, home depot, these places almost always have them, wal-mart does sometimes even. But do not get the thin kind, there are some that are made for grippy use only, and they are very thin compared to the heavier working gloves.

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