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  1. #1
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    Mcleods and or Rogue Hoes online

    I'm looking to purchase either one of these tools (mcleod or rogue hoe) online and need to know the best place or deal to get them. Any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Go right to the source http://www.prohoe.com We have been using these and find them to be great trail tools.
    Trail Builder, Trail Rider,and Trail Protector

  3. #3
    HIKE!
    Reputation: sparrow's Avatar
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    You can set up a wholesale account with ZAC tools (they have a lot of other things) and get free shipping on a $850 order. My shop did that and sells tools to our club members. McLeods in combo with a pick or pulaski has been our #1 trail building tool solution.

    We have used ProHoe's Rogues and have too rugged/rocky soil for them and have broken them under the hands of over zealous volunteers. They do have their place, but around here it's the Pick/MCLeod combo that works best

  4. #4
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    Ok so who has the best deal on mcleods? I just need one. I'm a one man wrecking crew here.

  5. #5
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    New Trail Building or Existing Trail Maintenance??

    Depending of the type of trail work you plan to do, you might want to prioritize which tool you buy. If you are primarily building new trails from scratch, IMO go with the McLeod. If you are doing maintenance to existing trails, IMO go with the Rogue Hoe.

  6. #6
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    Trail Builder, Trail Rider,and Trail Protector

  7. #7
    featherweight clydesdale
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    Quote Originally Posted by donwatts

    http://www.benmeadows.com/search/McL...sredirect=true

    Same place, different model. A friend had a Corona and it broke in a day. I like Corona hand saws though.

  8. #8
    Builder of Trails
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    You can also find trail tools at Forestry Suppliers. Unlike ZAC, these McLeods have a bold on the bottom, which can cake up with sticky dirt and leave pock marks in your trail.

    D

  9. #9
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    I feel the Zak is the best as it does not have the bolt issue and it has the joint welded. We have broken 2 of them but getting a reweld is not an issue. The thing I like the most is that they weigh more than the other 3 brands we have and they make the best tampers as well as the head shape and rake teeth work the best around these parts. I have not tried a Lamberton rake.

    Be sure to get a fiberglass handle on whatever tool you decide on!
    IF YOU CAN READ THIS, YOU'RE NOT RIDING (or building)!

  10. #10
    Who turned out the lights
    Reputation: Francis Buxton's Avatar
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    http://www.zactool.com/productonlinecatalog.html

    Click on "online catalog".

    I agree with 777, the Zac McLeod (now manufactured by American Presto) is the best McLeod. They give a 10% discount if you're an IMBA member. I'm a big fan of the McLeod.

  11. #11
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    Our club uses the prohoe to clear the corridor of small trees on the first pass and the mcleod for removing leaves and light dirtwork on the second pass. Then the prohoe again for small bench cuts on the third pass. In the hands of the right person, prohoes are one of the most productive and versatile tools you can get. However, you don't want to put a prohoe in the hands of an inexperienced worker. The prohoe is not an axe or a pry bar, and using it like one will eventually brake it. By chopping the surrounding roots holding trees in place, you should be able to quickly remove up to wrist-size trees (again, if you chop at the tree itself, the prohoe will eventually break). Usually there's one or two small roots that once cut, will allow the tree to just lay over.
    Part of what makes a prohoe so useful is how sharp it is, so a dull blade will make it less effective. We don't have rocky soil here, so I'm not sure how that would affect it, but I'm sure it could make quick work of the prohoe's thin blade.
    We have several models that prohoe makes. The ones with curved hickory handles are by far the most durable http://www.prohoe.com/productCat100753.ctlg
    My personal favorite is the 55H http://www.prohoe.com/item573082.ctlg
    There are definately some tasks for which there's no substitute for a mcleod. But given the choice of a tool, particularly for tree removal and rough dirtwork, I'm a fan of the prohoe due to it's lighter weight and superior cutting ability.

  12. #12
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    Damn! After the 4th or 5th post I went ahead and bought the CORONA one at Ben Meadows cuz of the price. Now I hear it's gonna break on me. I also bought a rogue hoe. My trail is barely rocky and not much root so maybe the CORONA wont be so bad. Right? Someone say RIGHT!

  13. #13
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    I think you're just fine. I've had a corona mcleod for 2 years without any problems. I mainly use it for finish work on bench cuts.
    You mentioned you also had a rogue hoe. Used in combination, the rogue hoe and the mcleod can't be beat. The rogue hoe cuts into the soil easily and is great for roughing in a benchcut. It easily slices through large roots. The rogue hoe's blade is too small to get a nice finish on the tread, so that's where the mcleod comes in. A sharp mcleod will take care of the remaining "thumb-size" roots and create a nice smooth tread.
    Personally, I spend alot more time removing small trees and doing maintainence on existing trails. Unless I have a new trail to construct or specific dirtwork planned, I usually don't carry the mcleod.

  14. #14
    Human Power LLC
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    I bought my Mcloud on Ebay for around $60. Brand new.

  15. #15
    featherweight clydesdale
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giant24Yukon
    Damn! After the 4th or 5th post I went ahead and bought the CORONA one at Ben Meadows cuz of the price. Now I hear it's gonna break on me. I also bought a rogue hoe. My trail is barely rocky and not much root so maybe the CORONA wont be so bad. Right? Someone say RIGHT!
    If it breaks, you can get it welded back on with a little extra support.

  16. #16
    Builder of Trails
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    Quote Originally Posted by donwatts
    Go right to the source http://www.prohoe.com We have been using these and find them to be great trail tools.
    Our company just received three new rogue hoes and put one to use yesterday. Very sweet! I love the longer handle, and the hoe end is great for cutting roots. The seven-inch wide hoe even tamps decently.

    D

  17. #17
    beer thief
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    Quote Originally Posted by th29
    ...There are definately some tasks for which there's no substitute for a mcleod. But given the choice of a tool, particularly for tree removal and rough dirtwork, I'm a fan of the prohoe due to it's lighter weight and superior cutting ability.
    Another fan here. I've had a Rogue 55A for a few years and love it. We gave away a couple more to volunteers, and they are always the tool everyone wants to use. I just bought 10 more from Prohoe and they included an 11th one free, with the kickass hickory handle to boot.

    These tools are excellent for our bony New England soils. They hold an edge really well and cut duff like butter.
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