Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Landfill Cap

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    57

    Landfill Cap

    There may be a similar discussion buried deep down in this forum, but I'm lazy so I'll start a new one: Does anyone here have experience building (or deciding not to build) trail on a landfill cap?

    My group is in the process of receiving final approval for a trail design at a local park here in Wisconsin. Part of the park is the sight of a former landfill (closed and capped in the mid '80's), and the Town Board and DNR have obvious concerns about the possibility of a trail running across the cap. Basically, the potential for standing water, ruts, and/or erosion are big deterrants to allowing us to build on this particular piece of the park.

    I've done a bit of interweb searching and have come across a few places where it appears to have been done, but I don't have much more info other than the existence of such trails. I've also talked to an official at Waste Management who deals with redevelopment of closed landfills, and he thinks it has been done, but again, doesn't have much info. So I'm turning to this board to help me out! Any specific examples of trails/locations would be helpful, just for us to reference in our discussions with the Town Board.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    427
    I've steered away 2 potential projects that would have been on closed landfills because of concerns with how shallow the cap was.

    Do you know how much depth you have to work with? I don't think we had more than 18" in each case.
    CAMBr West
    Gives us a couple bucks and we'll give you some trails with sweet jumps and stuff.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    57
    I'm not positive on the depth, but it's clay covered in some top soil. Considering how long ago it was capped, I'm guessing it's not much more than 18".

    To make matters even a little more discouraging, I also just learned that building on the cap would require an annual permit/inspection by the DNR that costs $500. Sure, we could raise those funds, but that'd be a hefty sum to give up if they decide to close down that portion of the trail at some point.

    I'd still love to hear people's experiences, but at this point, it's not looking too good for us.

  4. #4
    humber river advocate
    Reputation: singlesprocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    5,929
    Support TORBA
    Sunnyside Bike Park Working Group
    Albion Hills Conservation Area Master Plan Public Advisory Committee

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    48
    In our case we were dealing with a thin cap as well as a methane gas collection system which involves numerous riser valves scattered all over the cell. There were concerns from the waste management folks about potential damage to both the cap and to the gas risers. We explored several options including asking for a thicker layer of soil on the cap(no dice due to cost), fencing the many risers off and hauling in compactable soil and bigger equipment to essentially build a reverse bench if that makes sense. In the end it was just too costly to develop trail in our case. There are 2 other unlined cells on this site that could come into play down the road as the lengthy decommissioning process continues and the gas production plays out. We ended up with a couple of miles in the buffers at this location.

  6. #6
    humber river advocate
    Reputation: singlesprocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    5,929
    Quote Originally Posted by Blurred_Vision View Post
    In our case we were dealing with a thin cap as well as a methane gas collection system which involves numerous riser valves scattered all over the cell. There were concerns from the waste management folks about potential damage to both the cap and to the gas risers. We explored several options including asking for a thicker layer of soil on the cap(no dice due to cost), fencing the many risers off and hauling in compactable soil and bigger equipment to essentially build a reverse bench if that makes sense. In the end it was just too costly to develop trail in our case. There are 2 other unlined cells on this site that could come into play down the road as the lengthy decommissioning process continues and the gas production plays out. We ended up with a couple of miles in the buffers at this location.
    i make protective covers for landfills as well as protective liner for the membranes. if this is helpful just pm me...
    Support TORBA
    Sunnyside Bike Park Working Group
    Albion Hills Conservation Area Master Plan Public Advisory Committee

  7. #7
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: mtbxplorer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    5,404
    The biggest landfill on earth now has mountain biking Freshkills Park : NYC Parks. More expensive to build than "regular" trails though, so it may not be practical unless the Town (or some other group) is really on board and wants to help fund it. Developing trails on landfills is best suited to places with little other public land available, making the extra build cost more acceptable.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    57
    Thanks for the info everyone. At this point we're likely going to bypass the cap, but may leave the design open to building on it in the future.

    It's a shame to lose the acreage for trail, but I could see it being the main source of controversy, too. We've been given a lot of leeway with regards to the where and how of the trail, but I know that if we went in with dump trucks full of topsoil to build up berms, things would get interesting. We'll be sharing the immediate area with hikers/birders/etc., so I think it's best that we start out with the most "peaceful" trail possible.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •