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  1. #1
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    How to stop horse traffic?

    Any suggestion on what to do when horse back riders ignore 6x6 inch No Horses signs? Do you think a more emphatic sign might work, like: "STOP. No Horses. Please stay on predesignated horse trails." Or, threaten a fine? Suggestions appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennasdad
    Any suggestion on what to do when horse back riders ignore 6x6 inch No Horses signs? Do you think a more emphatic sign might work, like: "STOP. No Horses. Please stay on predesignated horse trails." Or, threaten a fine? Suggestions appreciated.
    Make entry to said trail difficult for a person sitting on the back of a 1,000lb animal, but easy to everyone else. Low branches, horse-unfriendly bridges, rock chokes, things like that. Low branches plus log crossings at the same time can help, too. Also, really narrow and twisty trail discourages horses.

    You could try putting a motion-sensing trail camera along the trail at some point to get photos of the offending horse riders. You can submit them to law enforcement AND you can post signs at the trailhead noting that the following photos have been given to law enforcement. You could personally stake out the trail and personally tell the horses that they aren't supposed to be on said trail. If they give attitude, then you can call law enforcement to come give them a fine.

  3. #3
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    You can't keep horses off the trail. They have a god given right to all trails. If you don't believe me,just ask a horse rider,they will tell you so. OK that is a little harsh. But not too far from the truth.
    All the things that NateHawk said have been used by us,except the camera. All of those work good to keep quads and dirt bikes out also. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Maybe this is missing the obvious, but where's your local horseman's organization in this?

    We're pretty lucky here, we get on pretty good with the backcountry horsemen, and they are pretty good at taking care of their own, just as they expect us to try and keep mountain biking asshats under control.

    (fomica will relate a local incident now)

    Interesting case in point, we have an area that is being developed as a MTB/DH/FR park, with permissions and working with the City, but it's not official YET. For the first time in history, some neighbor rode their horse right around the most congested area of downhillers, and then when a very polite young man ( I know him personally)suggested they were possibly not making good trail choices, the horse/riders went off in a snit and proceeded to posthole up the brand new dual slalom course!!

    First thing I did was make some calls, to our parks guy for a heads up ( in case the horse people complain) and then to our IMBA rep who is good buds with the local head BCH guy. The BCH guy was as annoyed as the rest of us.... and he's happy to get the word out as soon as there is an official word to get out. The bummer is that we can't officially ban horses until we go through the parks board with a "bike park package" but that's down the road. So right now we are hoping this is a one time thing... first time horses have ever been seen in there.

    I'm not sure what my point is, but I guess it's make sure your land managers know whats going on, someone had a say in that sign going in.

  5. #5
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    Thanks. This is very helpful. What would make a horse-unfriendly bridge? (The horse has already broken three planks on one bridge).

  6. #6
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Here is a bridge on the Mackenzie River Trail in Oregon, something like this would do it...
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    Last edited by formica; 03-23-2008 at 09:28 AM.

  7. #7
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    A horse trailer unfriendly parking lot helps in some cases as well. That all depends on the location of the trail-head though.

    A rider on a horse needs about 8.5 feet of clearance. A rider on a bike only needs about 7 feet. Make a nice little arch at the beginning of each bridge with just enough clearance for a standing rider.

  8. #8
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    A horse unfriendly bridge would have planks/sticks that are spaced far apart so a horse can't safely walk on it. I don't know what ability level riders you have, but you could also try a narrower bridge.

  9. #9
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    something like a cattle guard except with logs. run a 2x12 across the logs so you can still ride it. we've thought about doing something like that in the past but our trails are multi use so we would get busted.
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  10. #10
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    Thanks all, great suggestions! I'll get to work.

  11. #11
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    IF it's your land, do whatever you want. I'd put up signs about prosecution for trespasers. If it's public/ or government land, talk to the land managers abut building limited access entrances (twisting trails, barriers, gates). Everyone has access to the land, some are just denied because of how much damage they cause.

    In reality, it's up to land managers to control the access of lands. People should have access to beautiful places, but when EVERYONE wants to use it, it can be a burrden. See example: National Park Systems. WAY overused in some areas.

  12. #12
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    Horse owners although very self absorbed tend to love their horses more than themselves. They also have big resources (aka $$$) Be careful about unsafe bridges where they would fall through. A very tall stepover could be just the ticket. Say about 2.5 feet. (think of a gate with a bar like an "H".

    I would consider an unsafe bridge a liability. The high step-over could be jumped but the owner won't risk hitting a clearly solid crossbar. It is too likely to break the horses leg but is obviously due to the owners negligence.
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    How about this, Our local trail has horse owners living nearby who can access the trails at any variety of points along the trail through the woods which are adjacent to their property. The trail is MTB specific and we have had the horse riders fined before and they continue to ride the trail, especially when it's very wet. Any insight on this?

  14. #14
    SamIAm
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    string barbwire all up above the max clearance you need so they horse riders have to watch their heads. make sure its electrified so when they try to take it down they get zapped like a bug.
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

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    hahaha, while inventive and effective I'm sure, I don't wish to decapitate or kill these guys

  16. #16
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    motion activated airhorn might be a good one to. scare the horses so much they wont go back
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by EclipseRoadie
    How about this, Our local trail has horse owners living nearby who can access the trails at any variety of points along the trail through the woods which are adjacent to their property. The trail is MTB specific and we have had the horse riders fined before and they continue to ride the trail, especially when it's very wet. Any insight on this?
    Education. Talk with them and acknowledge their "desire" to use the trail. Make it clear that postholing the trail when its wet is the worst thing they can do and if it persists, you, the land managers, or whoever will get MUCH more aggressive in enforcing the rules.

    Fence off the trail or neighboring property may be the most aggressive thing you can get away with. Horse riders are typically early morning or late evening riders, particularly in summer they like to avoid heat of the day rides.

    Now for fun (as a joke only...):
    you could lobby your state game commission for a "horse season." Late summer before deer season would work.
    put a horse head on a stick at the property line
    paintball 'em

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattirewilly
    ......paintball 'em
    Probly the best idea i've heard all day.

  19. #19
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    Already tried the buddy-buddy nice guy way of asking. They act like its all cool then do it again a week later. I think the motion activated airhorns are the way to go. Hmm... or paintball mines.

  20. #20
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    Who owns the land? Who is the Land Manager? Who installed the "NO Horses" signs? Even if you own the land, if you build what some people are calling"Horse unfriendly Bridges", you may set yourself up for a liability lawsuit due to creating a hazardous condition.
    If you don't own the land, you, and better yet, an organized bike riders group, should contact the actual land manager to discuss the situation and let the Land Manager take care of enforcement. I don't know where your trails are located, and I don't know how many multi-use trail networks are in your area, but if you have a "Bikes Only" trail, you should consider yourselves very fortunate and let the authorities do their job. You guys can take pictures of horseriders breaking the law and provide the photos to the land manager. Take pictures of the riders in the parking lot with their license plates. If there is bad vibes between bikers and horseriders, I wouldn't bother trying to engage in polite conversation with the horseriders.
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    Post a no smoking sign.

  22. #22
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    Make the trail-head IMPOSSIBLE for horse access. Install a gate thats not wide enough for a horse, and a bit of chain-link fence so they can't get around it. Bridges work, as does very rocky, windy and narrow trail sections

    Call the 5-0 if you see horses at your spot. All it would take is one talk with a cop and you can be assured that they won't come back.

    Paintballing them is also a good option.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boulder Pilot
    Who owns the land? Who is the Land Manager? Who installed the "NO Horses" signs? Even if you own the land, if you build what some people are calling"Horse unfriendly Bridges", you may set yourself up for a liability lawsuit due to creating a hazardous condition.
    If you don't own the land, you, and better yet, an organized bike riders group, should contact the actual land manager to discuss the situation and let the Land Manager take care of enforcement. I don't know where your trails are located, and I don't know how many multi-use trail networks are in your area, but if you have a "Bikes Only" trail, you should consider yourselves very fortunate and let the authorities do their job. You guys can take pictures of horseriders breaking the law and provide the photos to the land manager. Take pictures of the riders in the parking lot with their license plates. If there is bad vibes between bikers and horseriders, I wouldn't bother trying to engage in polite conversation with the horseriders.
    If the trail is posted, "No Horses" then using bridge designs that do not accommodate horses is in no way a legal liability to anyone. Now, if you install a booby trapped bridge, then that might get you in trouble, but making bridges too narrow for horses to use or making bridges with widely spaced decking so the horses can see through it are accepted bridge designs for discouraging horse traffic (perfectly acceptable for bike and foot traffic, though). The cattle guard idea is outstanding.

    A lot of the design features that restrict or prohibit ATV's are also applicable to horses. If horses are accessing from side trails or cutting in from a nearby road, railroad, or private property, then that can be tougher to police. If it's private property, you can talk to the owners (if they're complete idiots, it'll be the property owners poaching the trails). If railroad property, you can send the railroads after 'em (in addition to the park rangers). I strongly recommend motion-sensing trail cameras (heavily camouflaged and locked to trees, of course) if you've got a major problem. Those photos will give law enforcement a history of illegal access and that can really add up when they finally get caught. Just make sure you get one with an IR flash that doesn't tip them off to the location of the camera.

    If you've tried the buddy-buddy route already and it doesn't work, then it's time to bring the law into it. Document, document, document. Recently I saw some really severe horse damage to my local trails. Now my trails are true multi-use...the horses are permitted there. Only thing is, they rode the trails after a day where we got 2" of rain, and before that 4" of snow melted. The trails were super soft and the horses SHREDDED them. I turned an ankle walking and mapping them. I know some of the local horse riders (who are involved in the trail stewardship group I'm in) and I'll bring it up to them so that hopefully they can talk to their horsey friends and so on and hopefully we can convince the horse folks to be especially careful about riding trail when they're wet. Unfortunately, in this case, there really is no way to get the law involved even if a small group of horse riders continue to ignore people telling them to wait until the trails dry before they ride (unless the park decides to restrict horse use due to resource degradation, but that's not likely to happen).

  24. #24
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    A .30-06 will drop a horse (*snap*) just like that.



    (I'm kidding, I'm kidding...)

    It's a tough situation because I would like to think most of us know how they feel... as mountain bikers, we've all been there ourselves. What do you do if you love to ride, but can't find anywhere legal to ride? I don't horsey, but can sympathize.

    Of course, that being said, I OBEY the trail rules. If it says "no bikes", I don't ride there, and would expect the same level of respect from horseys.

  25. #25
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    If the trail is posted, "No Horses" then using bridge designs that do not accommodate horses is in no way a legal liability to anyone.
    The OP has not answered a few very important questions: Who OWNS the land? WHO is the Land Manager?

    If the OP owns the land and creates what can be considered a hazardous situation, he most definitely will expose himself to legal liability. The solution would be enforcement of tresspassing and illegal use of private property by the authorities, ie. local police. Example: True story. Shop owner in NYC was burglarized I believe 4-5 times. He hooks up 120 volts to the steel gates in front of his shop. Puts a sign on the gates stateing that they are electrified. Asshat tries to break in and gets fried. Shop owner gets tried for manslaughter. I know this is extreme, that the OP is not trying to kill anyone.

    Even if said person could be considered tresspassing, and property owner has minimal legal " Duty of Care", the tresspasser can still bring a "Negligence" lawsuit against the land owner. This is why most land owners develope a Risk Management Program to minimize hazards.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boulder Pilot
    The OP has not answered a few very important questions: Who OWNS the land? WHO is the Land Manager?

    If the OP owns the land and creates what can be considered a hazardous situation, he most definitely will expose himself to legal liability. The solution would be enforcement of tresspassing and illegal use of private property by the authorities, ie. local police. Example: True story. Shop owner in NYC was burglarized I believe 4-5 times. He hooks up 120 volts to the steel gates in front of his shop. Puts a sign on the gates stateing that they are electrified. Asshat tries to break in and gets fried. Shop owner gets tried for manslaughter. I know this is extreme, that the OP is not trying to kill anyone.

    Even if said person could be considered tresspassing, and property owner has minimal legal " Duty of Care", the tresspasser can still bring a "Negligence" lawsuit against the land owner. This is why most land owners develope a Risk Management Program to minimize hazards.
    The point is to make it physically impossible to get the horse there, not to cause injury if the horse rider chooses to ignore the signs. If the trail corridor is not cleared to the right dimensions, the horse+rider will not fit. If the bridge is too narrow for the horse rider to use (and fording options are blocked), then the trail becomes impassable.

    Again, nobody here is (seriously) recommending a bridge with a trap-door and spikes underneath it, or tiger pits or anything like that to punish the horses for riding the trails. People just don't want 'em there in the first place. The open-slatted bridge works exactly the same way as a cattle guard. The horse will refuse to cross because it does not see a solid walking surface.

  27. #27
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    Nate, I understand what you are saying. The question remains: WHO owns the property? If the OP doesn't own the property, he can't build anything without written permission from the Land Manager. There are very effective ways that address this situation. Nate, you have mentioned a few; cattle crossing grate, physically blocking access.

    Even if the OP owns the property, if he builds anything that may cause injury to a trail user, he runs the risk of being sued. He may win the case, but he will still have to pay to defend himself.

    If you (I mean everyone, not you specifically Nate) were to research areas where there are multi-use trails, horse specific trails, and bike specific trails, you will most likely find that there are indeed physical filters to keep the trails rider specific. You will also find that these filters are part of a Land Management Program that includes multiple elements and are enforced by the Land Manager.

    I agree, a narrow bridge with spaces between the slats would most likely deter most horseriders, it's the other few that I would be concerned with. If this was MY private property, I would have law enforcement deal with this. If this was not my property, I would contact the Land Manager, and let the Land Manager manage the land.
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  28. #28
    Silence! I kill you!
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    Just import a couple hungry mtn lions, and train them to attack whoever is illegally on the trails
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  29. #29
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    we had a nice fallen tree laying low going into a nice trail . It got mentioned on the boards. It got mentioned on how nice it was since it kept horses off.
    It got cut up shortly thereafter...

    Yes horses are allowed, but it was nice not having any potholes on that trail....Its mostly downhill

  30. #30
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    The Santos Trail system has specific trails for Horses, hiking and mountainbiking and typically have low branches just above or below rider (MTB) head height at intersections of the higher use horse trail intersections. It works pretty effectively and offers no excuses to on trail horseback riders ,and in that case all dismount and approach the horse slowly rules are off!
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  31. #31
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    Where I was riding this summer the horse riders were pretty nice and would stay on their own trails. The problem I had was that the horse trails crossed a paved path you had to ride to get to the mtb trail head and if a horse was in sight distance you had to stop and wait for it to get out of sight because our bikes spooked the horses. I actually got chewed out a couple of times because of it.
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  32. #32
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    a possible solution is at every trailhead, dig about a foot deep by 6 inches wide hole evenly spaced out enough...fill with concrete to nearly the top and stick a 4x4 wood post in each


    or you could move boulders in the way, but thats gonna be a little hard
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  33. #33
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    So will a .45

    Quote Originally Posted by benlineberry
    A .30-06 will drop a horse (*snap*) just like that.



    (I'm kidding, I'm kidding...)

    It's a tough situation because I would like to think most of us know how they feel... as mountain bikers, we've all been there ourselves. What do you do if you love to ride, but can't find anywhere legal to ride? I don't horsey, but can sympathize.

    Of course, that being said, I OBEY the trail rules. If it says "no bikes", I don't ride there, and would expect the same level of respect from horseys.

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  34. #34
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    motion activated airhorn might be a good one to. scare the horses so much they wont go back
    Gets my vote. But you need to set up a motion activated video camara.

  35. #35
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    Or do what my friend did, let the air out of there trailer tires everytime they parked on his property and use his trails, .....im not advocating this, dont actualy do it. But I personaly would look the other way.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boulder Pilot
    Nate, I understand what you are saying. The question remains: WHO owns the property? If the OP doesn't own the property, he can't build anything without written permission from the Land Manager. There are very effective ways that address this situation. Nate, you have mentioned a few; cattle crossing grate, physically blocking access.

    Even if the OP owns the property, if he builds anything that may cause injury to a trail user, he runs the risk of being sued. He may win the case, but he will still have to pay to defend himself.

    If you (I mean everyone, not you specifically Nate) were to research areas where there are multi-use trails, horse specific trails, and bike specific trails, you will most likely find that there are indeed physical filters to keep the trails rider specific. You will also find that these filters are part of a Land Management Program that includes multiple elements and are enforced by the Land Manager.

    I agree, a narrow bridge with spaces between the slats would most likely deter most horseriders, it's the other few that I would be concerned with. If this was MY private property, I would have law enforcement deal with this. If this was not my property, I would contact the Land Manager, and let the Land Manager manage the land.
    You are incorrect. If the trail is only designed for MTB riders, then they don't have to accomodate horses at all. Meaning they can do poles, boulders, narrow bridges, low tree's, etc. I doesn't matter if the rider or horse gets hurt. They should't have been there and were trespassing.

  37. #37
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    i'm building a trail in our local state forest (with permission) and it's to be strictly a bike trail. so my buddy and me were taking a break by the car when this lady pulls up on her tractor (after skirting the gate) to collect pine straw for her flower beds. we start chatting and i'm telling her about the bike trail and she's telling us about the area. come to find out she's got a donkey and an alpaca. she want's to get a cart for the donkey and she wants to walk the alpaca and donkey down to the creek via our parcel. i have a feeling we'll be seeing alpaca and donkey prints and droppings on the trail before anyone even gets a chance to ride it. signs will be going up soon.
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  38. #38
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    You are incorrect
    Please explain which part(s) of my response is/are incorrect. You state that if the trails are mountain bike specific, that they don't have to accomodate horse riders. I never said they have to accomodate horse riders. I'm trying to find out who manages the land. If the OP builds anything that LEGALLY can be determined to be a hazard,and someone gets injured, the OP can be held responsible.
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  39. #39
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    First off, fvck all the stupid lawsuits in this country. If someone tries to walk their horse across a 12 inch bridge, thats their fault.

    I personally think that limited access is the best way to deal with such problems. Skinny entrances, things you can lift a bike over are my favorites, those tend to work the best to avoid destruction and horse poo.

    Typically though, I just yell "FVCK YOU" everytime I cross a horse on our trails.

  40. #40
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    Just put one of these at each trailhead and set it to HORSE. Problem solved. You can also sell the horse meat to raise money for trail building tools.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    put up a sign that says something like

    mountain bike trail and free horse dismemberment service
    this trail has built-in features that are designed specifically for mountain bike riding and horse dismemberment. By using this trail you are explicitly agreeing that you are either riding a mountain bike or intending to dismember or kill your horse

    That way, if someone clipetty clops up the trail and Mr Ed breaks his leg, you can just say "thanks for taking advantage of our service, have a nice day"

    sorry but horses are a personal pet peeve. if my kid pooped wherever he happened to be walking; bit people and jumped around when he was nervous; was always nervous; took up the entire width of singletrack so that others couldn't pass and refused to move his fly-catching a$$ over; was the worst cause of erosion per capita of all non-motorized trail users; had to be driven around in his own parking-lot-hog trailer behind a 6mpg chevy duallie; ...[embolism] what was the question

  42. #42
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    photos. seriously. it's easy. have a camera in your camelbak or car, and take a picture of the person on horseback and then their trailer. cops can match them up and fine/yell at them. if this happens a couple times, word will get out and they'll knock it off.
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  43. #43
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    like this?

    I think the image says it all here.

    Taken on a ride on specific mountain bike trails at a park outside of Indianapolis a few years back.

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  44. #44
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    what the hell is enjoyable about attempting to control a dumb 1000+ pound animal just so your ass can feel bad. get a bike and ride it

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by JmZ
    I think the image says it all here.

    Taken on a ride on specific mountain bike trails at a park outside of Indianapolis a few years back.

    JmZ
    What park was that? Westwood, Avon?

    You know, I did some hiking at Mammoth Cave NP a year ago on some multi-use trails. On my last day, I filled my pack with garbage...most of which were beer cans and bottles. I have no doubt the horse riders hauled that stuff in. Worst part about it is that the NPS puts garbage cans out in the middle of the woods to deal with the garbage.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
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    How about horse (height) activated cougar recordings or grizzily bear recordings?
    IF YOU CAN READ THIS, YOU'RE NOT RIDING (or building)!

  47. #47
    Masher
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    what the hell is enjoyable about attempting to control a dumb 1000+ pound animal just so your ass can feel bad. get a bike and ride it
    Now theres a comment out of ignorance, I'm sure alot of people think the same about us with our dumb 20-40Lb bikes and sore asses.

  48. #48
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    1. bear traps
    2.buy a horse, ride it and kill someone,ok just assult a police officer or something. repeat as needed. horse riders will soon have a bad name and horses will be banned throughout northern america and parts of nebraska.
    3.speaking of nebraska,can we sell it back to the french? driving through it to moab made it seem like buying it was waste of money,pretty useless......
    4. ok back to horses, make a decoy path that is full of pits of death that bikers know not to ride on.

    See that wasn't so hard was it?

  49. #49
    shred
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    shoot em in the ass with a slingshot!. one time i was in some crappy trail in so cal and this skank started yelling at me for riding near her horse.

  50. #50
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    also, you could do a horse cookout on the same day as they tend to ride. they'll see a roasting horse over a fire and probally never come back.

  51. #51
    shred
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    that sounds mighty tasty

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTN MAN
    that sounds mighty tasty
    im vegitarian, ill just drink the beer, but i bet a nice 7% IPA would pair well with something like horse!

  53. #53
    shred
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    beer sounds mighty tasty with a nice raosted horse. i bet that would be delish or it could taste like a horses ass

  54. #54
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    Back on track, peeps

    You're posting in a Trail Building and Advocacy Forum, and frankly, as trail advocates, I'd say some of the responses are inappropriate and don't shed a very positive light on mountain bikers attitudes towards equestrians. I can see what some of you might consider as good natured humor in your replies, but there's also some pretty disturbing stuff in here that's bordering on downright ugly. Try to keep it on the up and up, I'd hate to see the OP's thread locked and sent to the Recycle Bin, or worse yet deleted because of someone crossing a line.

    Thanks for understanding. In the meantime, carry on.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  55. #55
    shred
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    wuw i wonder how many people read these little coment things

  56. #56
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    Gotcha. Politically correct keyboard is now turned on........
    Round of golf anyone?

  57. #57
    shred
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    Listen!

    i like turtles

  58. #58
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    OP here. Bob, thanks for keeping eye on this as I have gone back a number of times to reference ideas. To answer some questions, trail is in a county park. I am the local club's trail liaison to the park. The park is short handed and looks to the club to keep up the trail. Ideas suggested here that create new, interesting features for the biker while making it difficult for horses are on the money (as there is little money for things like cameras). Thanks to everyone who has contributed, very helpful.

  59. #59
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    While some horse people are a$$holes, most of the ones I meet are actually halfway cool - much like mountain bikers. A few ruin things for the lot. Now - how to keep horses off of "bike" trails.... Cattle guards work for cows - why not have a cattle guard at the trailhead, with some fencing on both sides? More effective than posts - harder to install, but much harder to remove. Then - make sure that if there is a bridge it is too narow or hard-to-use for horses. If some place is convenient, a height obstacle near the start of the trailhead might help, it will discourage any rogue horsey pilots from laying a 4 x 8 across the cattle xing and getting into the trail, as it "won't be worth the effort" for them. Signs on the bridges with "Max weight 600 lbs - One rider at a time please" might also do the trick! Another option would be to get together with responsible equestrians and build a "horse only" trail that is parallel or routed through a different part of the park. Have a bike-only trail, and a horse-only trail, and respect their trail and hopefully they'll respect yours. If they have a trail where they know no bikes will be coming up behind or at them, they will likely stay on it!
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living
    http://www.endlesscyclesonline.com

  60. #60
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    Thanks ATBScott for the new thoughts.

  61. #61
    Lobbyn ur Leedrz!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTN MAN
    wuw i wonder how many people read these little coment things
    Eh, I wouldn't worry about it, carry on.

    Cameras ain't so 'spensive ennymore: freeware + ebayware.

  62. #62
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    We always try to route the trailhead near something that the quads can't go over,but it works for horses also. Then make a narrow bridge that only hikers and bikes can use. The photo shows a trail we are building. When we scouted the trail,we made sure the trailhead was near this blowdown. The standing trees and the blowdown trees block the trail very well, and the bridge is fun to ride.
    The bridge in the second photo is over a hole that was made when a tree fell over and pulled the roots up. The trail is blocked on the right by the tree and on the left by a wetland filled with sticker bushes.
    Good luck with your project.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  63. #63
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    Very cool! Thanks

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