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  1. #1
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    How do I make the track??

    I've found a great spot to make some tacks for downhill but there is heaps of weeds and littles bushes in the way. How do u get rid of them I know I can just rip them out but there's a lot anybody got any tips?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isaac View Post
    I've found a great spot to make some tacks for downhill but there is heaps of weeds and littles bushes in the way. How do u get rid of them I know I can just rip them out but there's a lot anybody got any tips?
    Thanks
    Get permission?

  3. #3
    saddlemeat
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    Weedwacker, Round Up, rugged lawn mower, weed whip, rake, McCloed, shovel, hoe, are a few methods that can be used. Just ripping it out has simplicity and low overhead in it's favor. There must be fifty ways...
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  4. #4
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    Mate, if you think weeds and bushes are a problem, then you better learn about trail building before you even touch the land. Not trying to be rude, but mapping out trail, planning features and drainages, digging properly and looking after the land you work on are the big issues. If you were here I would say come and learn at an authorised build day, rather than doing something dodgy that I will have to close and rehabilitate, instead of using my time to build something else properly. Then continue to come and work at authorised build days instead of doing something dodgy. Also as cmc says - make sure you have permission before you start. Then make sure you are prepared to maintain the track for ever after.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    Mate, if you think weeds and bushes are a problem, then you better learn about trail building before you even touch the land. Not trying to be rude, but mapping out trail, planning features and drainages, digging properly and looking after the land you work on are the big issues. If you were here I would say come and learn at an authorised build day, rather than doing something dodgy that I will have to close and rehabilitate, instead of using my time to build something else properly. Then continue to come and work at authorised build days instead of doing something dodgy. Also as cmc says - make sure you have permission before you start. Then make sure you are prepared to maintain the track for ever after.

    I'm not building a proper mountain bike trail it's just me for and some mates where 14, it's not going to great or anything just some little jumps and berms. I don't think the land is owned by anyone aswell because there are no signs anywhere people pass by on motor bikes when they go for a ride. So I was just really asking how to get rid of it all but that's answered now.
    But thanks anyway mate.

  6. #6
    I build my own.
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    Isaac, the land is owned by somebody, signs or no. There's no land on the planet that isn't owned by somebody. I'm just warning you that anything you build, especially if it's close to a town will likely get torn down or shut down and you could get into trouble for building there. Kids have been building trails like yours for decades and will probably continue to do so.

    The people in this forum are dedicated, and some are professional trail builders. We have worked very hard for many years to get legal access to build mountain bike trails all over the world. We as a group have loosely adopted some guidelines that make getting permission and building trails easier. This ensures that the trails get to stay and this helps the entire mountain biking community.

    One of the obstacles we run into are what we call renegade trail builders. People like you who just go and build a trail on what they think is unowned land. When the landowner or some local person who walks their dog there sees the trail and gets upset, it sets us back a little bit and we have to fight harder to get access to legally build trails. We have all done it, been renegade trail builders. Most of us, back in the day when mountain bikes weren't allowed anywhere.

    Personally, I would appreciate if you would take some of the advice you have gotten in this thread. Try to find out who owns the land. Get permission to build there. Get involved with your local bike club. Learn how to build trails, jumps, etc. properly so they will last. I know you just want to have some fun and all this seems like it will be too much time and effort but you could be part of a solution or part of a problem. I'd like to see you be part of a solution.
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  7. #7
    I build my own.
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    P.S. If you want to build a legitimate trail, I'll be happy to give you all the help and advice you can handle.
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  8. #8
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    It's important to know the lay of the land.
    It's tough to judge over the internet whether it's something that could be a bad idea or not. You could be out in the sticks with a bunch of land nearby that's going to be an industrial park a number of years down the road. In that sort of case, nobody is likely give a damn about kids (or old men) building a few bike trails. Bulldozers and dynamite are coming at some point anyway. Or, you could be in an place where there is this whole crazy level of contentiousness over how every square inch of woods gets used, and people have been sitting through boring ass meetings with the local politicians for years, trying to get permission to build awesome trails, and staking a lot on promises that mtn bikers are going to go by the the rules. You don't want to mess something like that up.

    The lines between these types of land are invisible. That's where things get tricky. I've got both, and have built miles of trail on both, right out my door. I hope for your sake, you've got a bunch of dirt that nobody gives a damn about and can get out there and scrape in all sorts of sketchy lines that you and your buddies can just go out and have a good time ripping. Cuz just going out building and riding is way more fun than jumping through endless hoops at City Hall, even though it definitely has to be done in a lot of cases.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isaac View Post
    I'm not building a proper mountain bike trail it's just me for and some mates where 14, it's not going to great or anything just some little jumps and berms. I don't think the land is owned by anyone aswell because there are no signs anywhere people pass by on motor bikes when they go for a ride. So I was just really asking how to get rid of it all but that's answered now.
    But thanks anyway mate.
    Isaac, building sustainable trail is really hard work, requires expensive tools and commitment. It sounds like you and your riding buddies are looking for a spot you can put in a minimally built trail to have fun on, so unofficially this is what I would suggest.

    Try to use the natural features of the hill to pick and make the riding line. Don't make anything tight to avoid losing flow and having braking ruts form. Don't make anything out of rubbish. If you are going to build a jump, make it carefully and try to let the hill be the jump and the landing transition. If you must excavate, don't leave a hole that fills with water. Be subtle. Dig down to create a kicker and use the spoil to make the lander. Think of which direction water will flow through your features and don't ride straight downhill if you can weave, so water can run off the trail.

    With regard to the weeds and bushes, try to leave as much low vegetation as you can. So long as there are no stumps, rocks etc hiding where a pedal hit is possible, a tight line will attract less attention while you are finding who to ask permission from. It also allows you to work out where jumps etc can be best placed and is a challenge in itself. Try to cut bushes off cleanly so they are low enough to ride by, but allowing them to keep growing. Their roots will stop the trail from eroding as fast and they will recover if you move on to bigger things. Any noxious weed can be removed. Do it root and all and hang them upside down (we get big ones here) to die. Proving you are looking after the place will go a long way if you have to explain yourself.

    You are young, so don't get yourself in trouble over this. I suspect everyone on this forum wants you to get the love of trail building and you are also new to MTBR, so welcome and all the very best from me and sorry if I came off a bit tough on you. There are too many examples of fun trails gone bad here. So, don't build a dud.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    Isaac, building sustainable trail is really hard work, requires expensive tools and commitment. It sounds like you and your riding buddies are looking for a spot you can put in a minimally built trail to have fun on, so unofficially this is what I would suggest.

    Try to use the natural features of the hill to pick and make the riding line. Don't make anything tight to avoid losing flow and having braking ruts form. Don't make anything out of rubbish. If you are going to build a jump, make it carefully and try to let the hill be the jump and the landing transition. If you must excavate, don't leave a hole that fills with water. Be subtle. Dig down to create a kicker and use the spoil to make the lander. Think of which direction water will flow through your features and don't ride straight downhill if you can weave, so water can run off the trail.

    With regard to the weeds and bushes, try to leave as much low vegetation as you can. So long as there are no stumps, rocks etc hiding where a pedal hit is possible, a tight line will attract less attention while you are finding who to ask permission from. It also allows you to work out where jumps etc can be best placed and is a challenge in itself. Try to cut bushes off cleanly so they are low enough to ride by, but allowing them to keep growing. Their roots will stop the trail from eroding as fast and they will recover if you move on to bigger things. Any noxious weed can be removed. Do it root and all and hang them upside down (we get big ones here) to die. Proving you are looking after the place will go a long way if you have to explain yourself.

    You are young, so don't get yourself in trouble over this. I suspect everyone on this forum wants you to get the love of trail building and you are also new to MTBR, so welcome and all the very best from me and sorry if I came off a bit tough on you. There are too many examples of fun trails gone bad here. So, don't build a dud.
    Thanks heaps this is really a lot of help to me for when we go there I'll keep it small anyway but later on I might just end up bould a proper trail with permission haha.

  11. #11
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    Gotta say - this post is an excellent example of someone in need of knowledge getting exactly what they needed, without preaching or smart-assery.

    Trail building seems to attract good people. Thanks for spreading the word.

    Steve Z
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    And paddling when it's wet

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  12. #12
    saddlemeat
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    Kids riding bikes on vacant land doesn't seem like it should be so complicated. It was considered a wholesome activity when I was growing up.
    A Useful Bear is a handy thing.

  13. #13
    I build my own.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    Kids riding bikes on vacant land doesn't seem like it should be so complicated. It was considered a wholesome activity when I was growing up.
    Yeah, me too. Unfortunately things have changed a lot since I was a kid. Nobody would have thought of suing if they hurt themselves while riding on a vacant lot so therefore landowners had no problem with kids doing so.

    I have a good example close to me. There is a "pit" where the kids have built dirt jumps for years. The land owner knew but didn't do anything about it. He liked the fact that the kids were having fun there. About 10 years ago an older gentleman from out of town heard about the "mountain bike trails" so he drove up and went for a ride. The first thing he did was ride blind off a 15' drop, broke his XC bike and his neck. The next thing he did was sue the land owner for $13 million dollars even thought the land was fenced and posted. He won.

    So now the kids still build dirt jumps there and the land owner still lets them. Unfortunately he goes about every 3 months or so and bulldozes everything flat. It shows his insurance company and the next lawyer that tries to sue him that he's practicing due dilligence to reduce the risk of trespassers getting hurt on his land.

    40 years ago the whole situation would have been handled by telling the injured biker "Serves you right".
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