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  1. #1
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    Ditch Witch SK500 questions

    Our throttle cable is "slipping" and binding, anyone else have this trouble on the DW SK500? We are going to pull the cable line out to lube, inspect it (?) and perhaps we just need a new one. It does not operate smoothly, sorta full throttle, or idle, no real in between. And lately it has loosened up a bit to where you can't get full throttle anymore. Hmmm, we'll just dig into it, but thought I'd ask.

    The Sixway blade has a bolt right at it's center around which it moves left right. Our has developed a KLUNK and clank right at that point, but the nut/bolt is tight. Is there a bushing in there that may have failed? I can't quite see what caused the loose action there.

  2. #2
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    So, google found me these:

    http://www.equipmentland.com/product...rs/index.shtml

    anyone used such?

    That was one item I was wondering about for the SK500, could be a godsend in our intermittent rocky terrain.
    Last edited by sparrow; 12-31-2007 at 04:07 PM.

  3. #3
    Builder of Trails
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparrow
    So, google found me these:

    http://www.equipmentland.com/product...rs/index.shtml

    anyone used such?

    That was one item I was wondering about for the SK500, could be a godsend in our intermittent rocky terrain.
    I've used DW's hydraulic jack hammers before. We're were trying to break very hard rock....like granite and had to create a seam by hammering along a line a little at a time to get it to break. It's a good tool if you have the budget for it.

    As far as your above mentioned problems, it seems like you're doing the right thing by pulling the cable and inspecting and cleaning it. The clunking could be explained by a worn bearing or bushing. Also, how often did that part get lubed? Periodic maintenance is one routine that cannot be forgotten.

    D

  4. #4
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    Here's Ryan operating a jack hammer that is hydraulically connected to a DW. This was on DuPont SF in NC about four years ago.



    D

  5. #5
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    Any tips on what model/brand of jackhammer/breaker to look at? I guess we'd have to tell the rental place what our machines hydraulic output is etc. This is mainly in limestone or sandstone, to shatter or crack rocks so we can get through the occasional tricky section. We are going to try to get a equipment rental place to let us test drive one. Just wanna know what to ask for. Is it pretty convenient to use the thing, or do you have to top off hydraulic fluid often, any worries like that? I envision working along with the machine, getting to some rocky stretch, pulling the jackhammer out to work a swath infront of the machine 10' or so, then proceed with the blade.

    The Sixway blade gets greased, and only has 80 hours on it. Just gotta take it out for a look, I suppose. Anyone with a quick idea what it could be....

  6. #6
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    All righty, so does the Stanley Jackhammer (pic above) plug right into the DW SK500? Or is there need for a limiter, or hydraulic flow adjustment of some sort to connect. The SK500 has greater capacity than the jackhammers I've seen listed. Do you just power down to an idle with the SK500? Got any photos of the hydraulic hookup?

    And, by the way, we got our SK500 all spiffed up (80 hours on it). We do all the oil, air filter, greasing, etc on the time schedule, if not even sooner. The blade had a loose bolt that holds the bushing into the center pivot, so that snugged her up good. And a little play in the linkage points is just inevitable, it is pretty minor. The throttle cable had a small lock nut rattle itself off the attachment end, no big deal. The gas gage quit working, maybe run it by the DW dealer for that. Oughta be warranty work on a lease machine that is new. But the gage can be lived without.

    I made a little tool carrier (lunch, water, tarp, flagging, grease gun etc...) that hooks on the 6 way blade. I just bolted a couple tarp tiedowns onto a 32 gallon rubbermaid tub, and used some flat steel strap to reinforce the tub so it all doesn't rip right out. I'll snap a photo, it's a nice way to haul things into the work site. It only ran about $15 all total.

  7. #7
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    Simple little tool/accessory carrier

    32 gallon Rubbermaid tub, a couple tarp tiedowns and some metal strapping to reinforce. Makes it alot easier to bring my coffee and donuts along!

    And jackhammer specialists! Drop me a line or PM if you got info on hooking one up, what to look for, size, etc. Gallons per minute, do you have to add a few gallons of hydraulic fluid once you hook it up (I imagine the lines have to fill up and that's gotta take some fluid). Working in some limestone hogback ridges and intermittent rocky spots as we go. Plus the occasional frozen clay section. We are trying to arrange a demo of a Stanley through our Ditch Witch dealer.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Nice work Tim. Looks good!

  9. #9
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    Well, crap. Been talking to the guys at our Ditch Witch dealership. They sell/rent Stanley stuff, too. But the gist of it is, about $2k for a jackhammer, about $2k for a hydraulic-converter (takes the SK500 output and reduces it to the rate/pressure needed for the jackhammer), and a few hundred bucks for hoses and quick connect couplers. Oh, and the converter is about 100lbs, mounted in a frame, so two guys can carry it in. Not real easily portable. Hmm, could *hook* it over the blade, like my ghetto accessory box, but crud.

    The portability is more the bummer. I was hoping the jackhammer would just plug into the machine, then run the machine at idle to power the tool. I guess the machine is "overkill" for the handheld jackhammer, so the converter is needed.

  10. #10
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    I wonder, since it is going to be clunky anyway if there is a full size jackhammer that will work with those pressures?

    Another angle, does the DW have an accessory elec power port? IE: it generates elec? If so the electric jackhammers would handle what we need to do.

    BTW, we are getting the signage started, should be nice.

  11. #11
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    Got a chance to demo a hydraulic jackhammer and hydraulic power pack this wee. Pretty neat set up, the hydro power pack comes on a wheeled frame with wheelbarrow handles so it can be trundled along to the worksite along the trail bench. Heavy set up, requires a couple guys to man handle it and the jackhammer plus hose add up to 150lbs. The power pack is 250lb ish.

    I could see some potential in using it, but we'd need to move up to a larger jackhammer to be effective (we used a 55lb)! I think it could be a time savings if we plan exactly the zones along the trail to use it, and knocked them out with the jackhammer over the course of 2-3 days then return the unit. Better if we can get one donated for a weekend!

    The mounting of a handheld jackhammer to the SK500 is a lot bigger trouble than just plug and play (as I've found out), as the hydraulic fluid to the attachment needs a pressure correcting manifold of sorts to keep the fluid flowing and cooling and to avoid drastic pressure build ups and heat. NOT just to protect the jackhammer, but to protect the SK500 as well.

    There is a bigger attachment jackhammer that fits on the SK500 plate, but at nearly $5k and no one has one to test drive, well, we'll keep slugging it out with the combo of machine and hand labor. The SK500 has really sped things up and opened up a new level of quality bench cut to us, so I guess looking for more mechanized help (the jackhammer idea) is just me being greedy for mechanized solutions.

    Now, where to get one of those Sweco bulldozers.....

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