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  1. #1
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    Cordless chain saw....?

    Here is that review I wrote later so you don't have to go fishing through the whole thread to find it

    Trail Tire TV: Battery Powered Chainsaws for trail work,...?




    Anyone played with these yet? What's your thoughts?

    I just got one (well back a few months ago but never got out to play) And I got to say I'm pretty impressed. Now I'm no chainsaw expert (far from it) which is why I decided on this instead of another gas powered one that I keep having to rebuild all the time do to lack of use.. not only annoying but time consuming and sorta costly and it never seems to work when you need it most. anyway, I'll do a full write up once I get some more time with it.
    But I got to say for a simple "round the yard and occasional trail cleaning" this is about perfect! Lasts WAY longer than I expected. Ran pretty much consent for an hour and it's still got 1/2 a charge and had no noticeable down grade in power.

    there are a few draw backs but rather minor and not worth dishing it over... (I'll get into them in the review later..)

    I'm pretty impressed!!

    Cordless chain saw....?-greenworks.jpg
    Last edited by thomllama; 01-16-2014 at 07:58 PM.
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  2. #2
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    I think Makita and Stihl both have battery operated saws too. I'm interested but until I find someone that actually owns one and can say something good about it I'm holding off for the 2nd or 3rd generation.
    Should you do more trail work?

  3. #3
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    haven't used a cordless chainsaw, but I love my dewalt sawzall with a 12" blade. I can't get the fun cuts you can get with a chainsaw, but if you just want to remove smaller trees, works great. Can also remove the blade while traveling and everything fits in a backpack.

  4. #4
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    Cordless chain saw....?

    Will be interested to read your full review. Am considering one but am not sure on battery life, power, or longevity.

    Which model did you get?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    haven't used a cordless chainsaw, but I love my dewalt sawzall with a 12" blade. I can't get the fun cuts you can get with a chainsaw, but if you just want to remove smaller trees, works great. Can also remove the blade while traveling and everything fits in a backpack.
    been doing that for YEARS with my massive 28 Volt Millwakee .. but the battery's have kinda died on it, and to be honest, the chainsaw is a good bit lighter (no gearing and mechanical head needed to go from rotation to reciprocating movement) and WAY more usable.. Plus like 1/2 the price .. don't get me wrong.. the sawzall works great thou for anything smaller than like 4-5 inches.. perfect pruner unit!!

    Quote Originally Posted by plantdude View Post
    Will be interested to read your full review. Am considering one but am not sure on battery life, power, or longevity.

    Which model did you get?
    Greenworks 12" with 40 volt (4 ah) "G-Max" battery, they have a 2 ah G-max battery one that is exactly the same saw just the smaller battery. But after even just the one use today I don't think I would bother with the little battery. Just don't think it would last,.. though if you only need it to do 1 or 2 cuts.. well it will without issue and it's like 60 bucks less.

    They have smaller 18- and 20 volt units..(also like the Mikita and Stilhl mentioned above) but those aren't really big enough blade or powerful enough to "really" cut a tree.. most anything those can comfortably cut I can do just as good with a handsaw. And the exercise is good for ya
    They just came out with a 16" I don't think it's gunna be a big hit as mine definitely had some struggling issues just cutting the 9" tree I cut,.. had to keep rolling it around so the cutting face was smaller.. just think it'll bog too much. But supposedly they improved the motor a bit in that one sooooo...?

    One of the biggest complaints with it when reading reviews is the oil storage cap for the chain oiler leaks,.. I fixed that in like 30 seconds by slapping an 12 cent O-ring on it, honestly it's something that should come with it LOLOL

    The tree in the picture is probably the limit of it's cutting I'd say.. about 9" or so. again, not a major lot clearing tool but it's much lighter and easier to carry than I was originally thinking and would make a perfect "trail day" saw
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bfluid View Post
    I think Makita and Stihl both have battery operated saws too. I'm interested but until I find someone that actually owns one and can say something good about it I'm holding off for the 2nd or 3rd generation.
    I'm like you... this unit is 3rd generation. both updates in motor and style as well as some major improvements in battery. I read a LOT of reviews before even considering one, and I happened to be lucky enough to have a guy come to a trail clearing day with one. Watched him cut down multiple small/mid sized trees with out a hiccup. and the battery lasted him the full 3 hours we were there, not running constant but still pretty impressive enough for me to start looking into them.
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  7. #7
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    My $.02:

    I've had several "cordless" saws over the years; my most recent was a Greenworks 20 volt pole-saw which was really cheap from Woot. I was pleasantly surprised with it's capability; while not much faster than an "armstrong" pole-saw it was much less tiring. (although the reach was limited)

    I have a little 12 volt (NiMH) Makita chainsaw that won't set any records but it's been super-reliable and is good for some types of pruning (like cutting fronds out of palm trees)

    More recent than that is an 18 volt (Li) Ryobi unit that is also only a little faster than a good hand saw but again less effort.

    Hard to beat the power to weight ratio of "regular" gas engine chainsaw though; electric motors may have 8x the efficiency as a gas engine but gas has 50x the energy per weight. If you're cutting all day long gas is the hands-down winner. (When we finally run out of petroleum it'll be a different story!)

    A couple of caveats; battery-powered saws are stealthy (a possible advantage) and also in some local (to me) parks volunteers are forbidden to use gas-driven equipment but are allowed to use battery powered.
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  8. #8
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    Yay. This is the 40 volt 4ah, looked at the 20 volt stuff but like you I've had lots of cordless stuff over the yrs and know that larger is better by a lot. The newer li_on batteries are a big plus. The 20 volt stuff just doesn't have the nut this has... not that a gas wouldn't beat it.

    Again... not an all day unit like you said, but the little I use a chain saw this far exceeds the gas. Gas saws need regular use and service. I've had 6 chainsaws and all have scraped out when in needed them the most, costed bucks to fix, cost bucks to store... Bla bla bla. When you only use it once or twice a yr, gas sucks as it almost always needs something to get it running, even after draining gas or using gas saver crap.

    Gas May have more power, but only when it actually runs.
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  9. #9
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    Does anyone have the Stihl?
    Should you do more trail work?

  10. #10
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    I have been thinking of the Oregon 14" saw, would value the feedback of some actual users. I have used the Stihl AC electric saw a fair amount for carving joints in logs and timbers and the convenience of electric is no small thing. I would keep my Stihl 250, which is what I use currently, along with a 30" bull saw w/ bike scabbard, and a 48" Tuatahi racing crosscut for the big ponderosas.
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  11. #11
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    Yay, looked at the Oregon, but at 2x the price with lower voltage and only a 2ah battery...? Well for that I can get extra batteries for this, as well as chains, oil bla, bla, bla
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  12. #12
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    We have a Stihl MS192t Arborists climbing saw, about 9lbs with gas. Easy as heck to take anywhere, bit pricey, but it does the trick for most clearing. Bigger (1'+ diameter) we have a bigger farm boss and a dakine pack and rigging set up (if necessary).

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    Yay, looked at the Oregon, but at 2x the price with lower voltage and only a 2ah battery...? Well for that I can get extra batteries for this, as well as chains, oil bla, bla, bla
    The Oregon has a longer bar and a built in sharpener. That could be good or bad, I wonder which? Not so concerned about the price but you have make a point.
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  14. #14
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    I guess the operative questions are- will it do anything a hand saw won't? I s it a substitute for a handsaw or a gas chain saw?
    I am not repeating myself I am not repeating myself!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Sugar View Post
    I guess the operative questions are- will it do anything a hand saw won't? I s it a substitute for a handsaw or a gas chain saw?
    I've used electric chainsaws extensively but I haven't used one for trail work. I believe I can answer your questions:

    - will it do anything a hand saw won't? - Cut more faster and save wear and tear on the user. The only thing I can think of that you couldn't actually do with a handsaw would be a plunge cut (I've used them in trail building)
    - Is it a substitute for a handsaw or a gas chain saw? - Can be used where gas saws aren't allowed and is lighter than a gas saw. If I knew the saw would get all the cutting done that I wanted to do that day without running out of power, I'd leave my hand saw home.
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  16. #16
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    This model looks interesting too... says it can cut a cord of wood on one charge.

    Greenworks 20312 40V G-MAX Cordless Lithium-Ion DigiPro Brushless 16 in. Chain Saw Kit
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  17. #17
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    I have always used a cordless saw, they run on gas.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
    I have always used a cordless saw, they run on gas.
    Still has a cord,.... think about it....... think about it........

    Lol
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    I have been thinking of the Oregon 14" saw, would value the feedback of some actual users. I have used the Stihl AC electric saw a fair amount for carving joints in logs and timbers and the convenience of electric is no small thing. I would keep my Stihl 250, which is what I use currently, along with a 30" bull saw w/ bike scabbard, and a 48" Tuatahi racing crosscut for the big ponderosas.
    I took a chance on the Oregon Power a couple of years ago. Love it!! Still not as powerful and capable as the gas but I carry my Oregon on my back with spare batteries and ride the trails to get to the downed trees and work sites. Excellent!!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    The Oregon has a longer bar and a built in sharpener. That could be good or bad, I wonder which? Not so concerned about the price but you have make a point.
    I think that sharpener is one of its big advantages. The price was a bit steep (compared to gas) but still cheaper than the SthiL battery.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmats View Post
    I think that sharpener is one of its big advantages. The price was a bit steep (compared to gas) but still cheaper than the SthiL battery.
    ya, looked at that, but was more than 2x the Greenworks.. can get the newer 16" green works for a hundred less and get an extra battery ..

    Would love to compare the 2 side by side.. I'd guess the Oregon is better, just 2x better?? Hey are you inCT or New England area?
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  22. #22
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    OK, here's my 1st impressions write up.. also edited and added into the first post so it's not lost to a new comer to the thread...

    Trail Tire TV: Battery Powered Chainsaws for trail work,...?
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    ya, looked at that, but was more than 2x the Greenworks.. can get the newer 16" green works for a hundred less and get an extra battery ..

    Would love to compare the 2 side by side.. I'd guess the Oregon is better, just 2x better?? Hey are you inCT or New England area?
    No, unfortunately I'm in Hawaii. I bought mine from Amazon, free shipping here to Hawaii which was a big deal. Also, over the last two years or so, I did manage to get the chain stuck and broke the chain tensioner twice. In both cases, Oregon shipped to me replacement parts no charge to me, not even shipping. Talk about supporting their product. I strap the saw to my pack and carry three batteries in the pack. Ride the trails and clear the trails of the trees that fall across. Oh, and the prices have dropped since I bought it two years ago AND they have an even more powerful battery that wasn't available when I purchased two years ago.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmats View Post
    No, unfortunately I'm in Hawaii......
    errr I think I hate you just a little now.. LOLOLOLOL Hey, What does that saw weigh in at?
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  25. #25
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    I'm using the Ryobi 18v lithium ion and have been happy so far. I wanted to get the higher volt(store guy told me this was almost as powerful as a gas model) but Home Depot was out of stock. Cutting pepper trees and palmetto roots, blazing trail and maintaining existing trail over the past 6 months with great success. I have some other Ryobi tools so always have extra batteries and chargers. Got this version on sale for less than $100. Think the Lithium batteries are way better than the NiCad of the older tools.

    Pros - light weight, instant start, no pull, quiet.

    Cons - not as powerful as gaspowered, battery life is good but gives no indication of getting low, the saw just suddenly stops. Not too bad but can get caught if not paying attention.

    Bottom line is a great quiet light weight tool for the trail. Does not do the big stuff as good as a gas saw but carrying extra batteries is easier than carrying fuel and the instant on vs the pull cord is well worth it for me.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmats View Post
    ...... I did manage to get the chain stuck and broke the chain tensioner twice. In both cases, Oregon shipped to me replacement parts no charge to me, not even shipping. Talk about supporting their product. .....
    that is sweet service, but I got to say Greenworks did REALLY well in the service/customer satisfaction area... read the latest on TrailTireTv...
    Trail Tire TV

    this image is a hint...Cordless chain saw....?-saws.jpg
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  27. #27
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    of course google or blogger got hacked or something as blogger is only giving errors...
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    errr I think I hate you just a little now.. LOLOLOLOL Hey, What does that saw weigh in at?
    HAHA! Living here has its perks and its drawbacks.

    The saw weighs about 9.5 lbs, battery about another 2.75 lbs ea.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    that is sweet service, but I got to say Greenworks did REALLY well in the service/customer satisfaction area... read the latest on TrailTireTv...
    Trail Tire TV

    this image is a hint...Click image for larger version. 

Name:	SawS.jpg 
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    Wow, that is some great customer service. Great and refreshing to hear. I hope the saw continues to work and not break down.

    I'm going to include a pic of my saw on my pack.

    Cordless chain saw....?-saw_pack.jpg

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmats View Post
    HAHA! Living here has its perks and its drawbacks.

    The saw weighs about 9.5 lbs, battery about another 2.75 lbs ea.
    That is about the same weight as a Stihl MS 250, so not much gained there. The convenience is worth a lot but a Bull Saw will quickly cut 6" to 10" material by hand.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cordless chain saw....?-dfpatrol02.jpg  

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  31. #31
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    Not sure about these battery operated saws they may be good for certain applications but for the cutting that I do I'll stick with my stihl 044 mag.with a 20"bar,064-32",and a ms200t-14" with them I'm able to cut everything and anything in these northeast woods. It's all about chain speed.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by TORQUE-29er View Post
    Not sure about these battery operated saws they may be good for certain applications but for the cutting that I do I'll stick with my stihl 044 mag.with a 20"bar,064-32",and a ms200t-14" with them I'm able to cut everything and anything in these northeast woods. It's all about chain speed.
    Agree'd. Understand. As others have noted, this is not a BIG power replacement saw. They're small and light enough to pack on my back when I ride decent amount of trails to do simple clearing and maintenance. It does not have the chain speed and power that the gas saws have. What it does have is the portability, cleanliness and ease of maintenance.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmats View Post
    Agree'd. Understand. As others have noted, this is not a BIG power replacement saw. They're small and light enough to pack on my back when I ride decent amount of trails to do simple clearing and maintenance. It does not have the chain speed and power that the gas saws have. What it does have is the portability, cleanliness and ease of maintenance.
    couldn't have said it better.. not going to carry a 20" gas saw 5+ miles into the woods on my back, with gas, oil.. tools.. bla bla bla..

    this is a track I did last time wit this saw,.. came to like 3 miles of hiking.. i cut out like a dozen dead/storm falls.. one area had like 5 trees down crisscrossing the trail from a domino effect, not something I would enjoy doing with a hand saw and no way in hell I would have done all that searching around hiking with a gas saw on my back... with the smell of gas, the noise of the saw (something the land manager kinda frowns on).. honestly everything I did in a 1/2 day would never have been done unless multiple people went in

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    How do they hold up in the rain? are they waterproof?
    how is the battery life in extreme cold like what we're experiencing lately? If it works for you use it, the gas ones work for me I don't mind the extra weight knowing it'll do the job when I get there.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TORQUE-29er View Post
    How do they hold up in the rain? are they waterproof?
    how is the battery life in extreme cold like what we're experiencing lately? If it works for you use it, the gas ones work for me I don't mind the extra weight knowing it'll do the job when I get there.
    I've had more issues with gas saws not starting...again, if doing a LOT of cutting and larger stuff no question about it. I'd bring a big gas saw.

    As to the cold, it's worked fine every time. I do keep the batteries inside. Also have had gas saws not start in cold sooo that's a wash. Don't care about water proof as I'm not running any saw in water, gas or electric...

    Might want to try one before you form an opinion. There is definitely a place for these battery powered saws for low cost, low maintenance trail up keep
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by TORQUE-29er View Post
    How do they hold up in the rain? are they waterproof?
    how is the battery life in extreme cold like what we're experiencing lately? If it works for you use it, the gas ones work for me I don't mind the extra weight knowing it'll do the job when I get there.
    I can't speak for the cold as I think the coldest I've been out with the saw would have been low-mid 60's. However, I can certainly say it rains a LOT here in Hawaii and I've had no problems to date. I carry the spare batteries in my pack which is sort of water resistant.

  37. #37
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    Cordless tools are simple, convenient, and trouble free, has been my experience. While great for deadfall removal, I agree that for any quantity of cutting a manual saw is not ideal. I'm still leaning towards the Oregon but the bigger Greenworks is interesting too. I have a lot of dead scrub oak in the 4" to 8" range to clean up, and I find a longer bar involves less bending over. The onboard sharpener seems like one less thing to keep track of, price is a factor but durability and service are too. The less intrusive nature or "stealth factor" of cordless is a big bonus (if not requirement) for me. :thumsup:
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  38. #38
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    I picked this up in September for some light cutting-

    Amazon.com: Black and Decker LCS120 20-Volt Lithium Ion Cordless Chain Saw,Includes 20v Battery: Patio, Lawn & Garden

    Decent, and finds it's way into my pack much more than I thought it would. The 20v is limiting though. I was already locked into Black and Decker 20v from other home stuff (leaf blower, weed whacker, drill) so I have 5 batteries. During the days I've been consistently cutting, I can burn through them all in 3 hours. I've got the quick chargers too, but after 5 batteries, the saw overheats itself and is done for the day no matter what. I doubt the saw was ever meant for that kind of work, but the limitation is there.
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    The stihl msa160 fits inside my camelbak and is perfect for stealth trail clearing where a handsaw is not enough. As long s you run high chain speeds it will cut up to 14" logs, haven`t tried anything bigger. onky for no-rain-days

  40. #40
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    Hitachi CS51EAP 50.1CC 20-Inch Rear Handle Chain Saw is well-known chain saw brand known to me so far.. It has automatic and adjustable oiler so user can adjust oil flow to the bar and chain.. It handles great,very low vibration and has a lot of power and is pretty lightweight for the size

  41. #41
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    I use the 40v Ryobi chainsaw for clearing brush and small trees at work. I can get about 1-1.5hrs worth of work out of one charge. I love the thing! It has a self-oiling system so you don't have to manually pump bar oil like you do with the smaller 18v unit.

    I mainly use it for fuel load reduction work (oaks trees and manzanita) and trees that fall on fences. It's not as good as a gas powered unit obviously but it will cut 10" limbs/trees no problem. The fact it is sort of light and I don't have to carry gasoline in my car is my main reason for buying it. It is also quiet which the neighbors enjoy.
    Cordless chain saw....?-ryobi-chainsaw-purchase.jpg
    Cordless chain saw....?-ryobi-battery-chainsaw.jpg

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    I bought the Greenworks G-Max 40V Digipro 16" chainsaw a few months ago to use for trail building and maintenance. Most of our local city/county parks don't allow volunteers to use gas powered tools/chainsaws, but they didn't say anything about electric tools . The lack of noise and reduced maintenance were other reasons to get one. So far I'm fairly impressed with it. I wouldn't use it to cut firewood, but for walking around in the woods and cutting the occasional 6"-16" log it works fine and no gas to carry. The battery lasts a long time, but I do have a spare since I also bought the Greenworks extended reach hedge trimmer. My only complaints are the chain auto oiler does not always seem to work properly, and possibly because of that the chain got dull fairly quickly. If you do need to cut a 20" log, it will take forever and possibly consume an entire battery pack. But I've cut 15+ 8" diameter logs without using the whole battery.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMtnB44 View Post
    My only complaints are the chain auto oiler does not always seem to work properly, and possibly because of that the chain got dull fairly quickly.
    Might want to try winter weight bar oil.

  44. #44
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    If anyone is interested, Stihl has a $100 rebate until June 30th.

  45. #45
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    GreenWorks

    And FWIW GreenWorks is selling this saw directly at $200 again:

    Powerful Cordless Digipro G-MAX Chainsaw 16 inch 40V Lithium-ion Battery Powered -20312 - Greenworks

    I purchased one (not at this low price) and it works well for special occasions like only needing to make a couple of cuts and when not worth the hassle of getting out a "real" chainsaw.

    I think they're marked down because they're pushing the 80v models (which are probably darn close to "real"!)
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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by epic View Post
    Might want to try winter weight bar oil.
    That probably is the solution, as the temps were colder at the time. It seems to be working fine now that it is warm.

    Quote Originally Posted by pliebenberg View Post
    And FWIW GreenWorks is selling this saw directly at $200 again.
    Still a good deal, and probably the best saw in this price range.

    I put a new chain on mine and it cuts like a champ again. The narrow gauge, small tooth chain does get dull quickly. I tried sharpening it, but either I did it wrong or the teeth were too far gone as it still didn't cut well after. But new chains are less than $20 on Amazon. I'll try to keep this one sharp and see how long it lasts.

  47. #47
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    ^Filing chains is an real art, maybe the depth gauges need to be filed down.

    That 80v saw looks promising, and it uses a real chain. I keep putting off buying an electric saw because they are rapidly improving, this one may get me to bite. I cut up a lot of dead 3"-8" scrub oak, and an occasional dead 6"-12" cedar. It would replace an 18" MS250.
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  48. #48
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    BTW, Costco is now selling the 80V Greenworks cordless chainsaw:

    http://www.costco.com/GreenWorks-Pro...=10301&refine=

    Somebody buy one and let us know how it works!
    Rolland

  49. #49
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    I picked up a 58V Echo a couple weeks ago and it's been working out great out on the trail and around the yard. I'm sick of dealing w/ 2-strokes.
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Sagebrush Slug View Post
    BTW, Costco is now selling the 80V Greenworks cordless chainsaw:

    http://www.costco.com/GreenWorks-Pro...=10301&refine=

    Somebody buy one and let us know how it works!
    I wish I'd known that before I went out and bought a new Stihl. Oh well, I'm sure the Stihl will do just fine. I sold my old saw (17lbs) and bough an MS250 (11.2lbs with bar&chain) because carrying the old one into trails any sort of distance was murder. This saw is much easier to carry (6 pounds is HUGE a couple miles in...) and was only a little more expensive than the Costo Greenworks saw. So the Greenworks could have saved me a couple bucks, but either way, I'm sure about the Stihl, and I simply have confidence that the greenworks would have been ok as well.

    2-strokes aren't that bad if A) no one messes them up B) you always use the right fuel/oil mixture (see A) C) you keep stabilizer in your fuel (see A) and know what you're doing with one. The worst time you can have with a two stroke is traveling from low altitude where it's tuned to run normally, and ending up on a trail at altitude and having to retune the saw so it isn't running so rich it'll barely run at all.

  51. #51
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    Update Greenworks 40v 16" saw

    I bought a "used" Greenworks 16" saw kit with the 4 amp battery from amazon warehouse for $170. I find it to be an excellent saw for my purposes, cutting standing dead oak from 4" - 12" and bucking it up for firewood. I finished bucking up my latest small load and was impressed to still have one of four leds showing on the battery level. I use the "pro" narrow kerf chain from Bailleys.

    So all the wood visible in this pic was felled and cut up with 3/4 of a battery charge, and it will take about 2 hours to recharge.

    I can't imagine wanting more power, and the battery lasts longer than I apparently do.

    I hear the 80v saw is a bit underpowered until the new $450 5 amp batteries hit the shelves.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cordless chain saw....?-20160222_141140-copy.jpg  

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  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    I bought a "used" Greenworks 16" saw kit with the 4 amp battery from amazon warehouse for $170.
    We have had a little echo CS-3000 I have had so long I can't recall. We have repaired it numerous times from heavy use.But it left us . Also need similar but not sure about "used" .I saw new Poulan pro 20 Bar for $190 and we're considering the possibility to buy . At first hope for warranty
    Last edited by topazann; 08-26-2016 at 03:53 AM.

  53. #53
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    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...condition=used

    Used means the packaging is damaged, for amazon warehouse purposes. I have never got anything that has actually been completely unpackaged, let alone used.

    I put a pro chain on mine and have never looked back, wouldn't take a free gas saw anymore. No ear muffs, no fumes, cuts with authority/torque that gas saws can't match given the same size. Not any/much lighter but the battery can be detached and carried by someone else. Straps on my loop bar with the big Voile straps.
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  54. #54
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    I bought the 18" Kobalt 80volt cordless chainsaw and it is sooooo solid. It's ease of use is incredible, and the safety/power-saving features are great too. It was pricey at about 300 but well worth it for me. I've seen it cheaper on ebay for around 260. I won't be using anything else anytime soon.

  55. #55
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    Phew, these battery powered saws have come a long way since a number of years I've had mine Oregon. I'm still using my Oregon 40 volt and loving it, have used it for so many years. I still have the old 2.4AH/40 volt batteries. Oregon now has the 4.0 AH batteries too (as do many others). This is great to see so many choices. One of my riding buddies has a DeWalt 40 volt and it seems to be serving him well.

  56. #56
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    I'd like to start this thread again because I have a few questions about the suitability of a cordless electric saw for trail work. Main issue is battery life and is it long enough for trail work like cutting blowdows and notching skinnies? Reviews suggest that the battery lasts pretty long, long enough to cut 1/2 cord of firewood. Also, a minimum recommended voltage and battery capacity. And, are the tool free chain adjusters reliable?
    I am not repeating myself I am not repeating myself!

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Sugar View Post
    I'd like to start this thread again because I have a few questions about the suitability of a cordless electric saw for trail work. Main issue is battery life and is it long enough for trail work like cutting blowdows and notching skinnies? Reviews suggest that the battery lasts pretty long, long enough to cut 1/2 cord of firewood. Also, a minimum recommended voltage and battery capacity. And, are the tool free chain adjusters reliable?
    I can only speak about the tool free chain adjuster on the 16" Greenworks 40v; it seems to work fine---just big plastic wingnuts (most of the saw is plastic anyway).

    It would probably cut 1/2 cord fireplace-lengths firewood if the wood was green. 1/2 cord of dry stove wood I doubt it. There is a "sweet spot" of it's functionality; a lot depends on where you're going and how you're getting there. (Hike, bike, moto, atv, 4x4???) If you're going to hike 10 miles to make just one cut a good handsaw might be the best choice. Somebody ought to make a graph; energy spent hauling the gear vs the energy spent making the cuts.

    It's turned out to be a pretty good saw to use up in trees, no hassle with pulling a starter cord.

    Here's what might have been a "1/2 cord" equivalent:
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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Sugar View Post
    I'd like to start this thread again because I have a few questions about the suitability of a cordless electric saw for trail work. Main issue is battery life and is it long enough for trail work like cutting blowdows and notching skinnies? Reviews suggest that the battery lasts pretty long, long enough to cut 1/2 cord of firewood. Also, a minimum recommended voltage and battery capacity. And, are the tool free chain adjusters reliable?
    Use the GMAX 40v 4 amp batteries with the 16" saw, they have considerably more power and run time, cost ~$125 each. The tool free chain adjuster has been totally reliable. The chain oiling system is a little wonky, but if you store it on it's side with the bar up it won't drip.
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  59. #59
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    Slightly off topic, but since as volunteers, we can't use power tools on our trails, I've been using a Silky Katana Boy, which is super impressive. I call it my inflatable chainsaw since it's edging into power saw territory yet you can still strap it to a pack and ride with it. Depending on your needs ofc, but if you're just clearing the random downed tree it's more than adequate.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Sugar View Post
    I'd like to start this thread again because I have a few questions about the suitability of a cordless electric saw for trail work. Main issue is battery life and is it long enough for trail work like cutting blowdows and notching skinnies? Reviews suggest that the battery lasts pretty long, long enough to cut 1/2 cord of firewood. Also, a minimum recommended voltage and battery capacity. And, are the tool free chain adjusters reliable?
    Cordless electric saws are perfect for trail work. Being quiet and not needing to carry fuel are the main advantages of course. Cutting blowdowns usually isn't all that much cutting compared to cutting firewood. I have two batteries (4 Ah) but only bring one, it's very rare I use more than 1/2 or 3/4 of the battery for clearing blowdowns. Notching skinnies can use a lot of battery depending on the size of the log and how deep your notches are. I have the Greenworks G-max 40V saw, and my buddy has the 80V saw. I think they are very similar in performance, the 80V doesn't really bring much more power. Keeping the chain sharp is most important for efficient cutting.

    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    The chain oiling system is a little wonky, but if you store it on it's side with the bar up it won't drip.
    Mine has the opposite problem, it barely applies any oil to the chain. I keep forgetting to contact Greenworks about it.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    The chain oiling system is a little wonky, but if you store it on it's side with the bar up it won't drip.
    The original creator of this thread posted a review for the Greenworks 40v 4 amp chainsaw in which he included a tip about leaks from the chain oil reservoir:

    Now one of the biggest complaints about the unit I came across while reading all the reviews scattered across the internet was oil leaking out of the oil cap. there is a small breather hole so if you turn it completely upside down the oil can drip out. It's super tiny so I can't see much getting out through it. But what I think they were actually talking about was it dripping from the cap threads, which it looks like it could do. A simple 12 cent o-ring from the hardware store took care of that without a second thought.

    I'm not sure why his recommendation is not convincing enough to go with the Greenworks 40v. If you haven't taken the time to look it over, do so. You don't really want to fool around with the saw not starting when you are out on the trail. You want to get the job done and spend your time riding. Gas saws are better suited to jobs where a truck is involved.

    If leaks are still a problem, make sure you have some cloth rags along or paper towels to absorb the oil so you don't end up with a messy backpack.

  62. #62
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    I decided on the 40V Kobalt with 12" blade because it was an easy choice- there's a Lowe's right around the corner. After about 2 weeks of use I'm ready to say its a great tool for trail building and maintenance. It can easily handle 20-30 cuts of various sized logs on one charge of the battery. Its well made, light, well balanced and very easy to use. The oil filler is on top so it doesn't leak. It has a very non threatening feel when compared to a gas saw. No vibration or engine torque twisting the saw around. And the lack of noise is a huge advantage. I'm going to buy a saw pack and an extra battery or two.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cordless chain saw....?-img_1395.jpg  

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  63. #63
    Ride lots.
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    Have the Greenworks 12" 40V with 2, 2 amp/hr batteries and 1, 4 amp/hr. Can take it on the trail in a large backpack and do an amazing amount of cutting and clearing. I take an extra chain ($10) and change it if I detect the cutting slowing.Take extra oil, too.

    With a few extra cuts and creativity, can cut 24" trees with a 12" saw. Must be very careful to avoid binding.

    This thing is a little miracle for clearing trails.

  64. #64
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    Anyone have experience with the Ryobi 40v saw sold at Home Depot? I have their string trimmer and it's excellent, so I'd really like to keep the same batteries and charger if I add to my 40v collection. I started my19.2v tools with a Craftsman impact driver, then added some more Craftsman, but in hindsight I maybe should have cut my losses and gone with a different brand. The drills, drivers and reciprocal saw I have are just fine, but Craftsman doesn't offer the variety of 19.2 tools as some other brands, and I don't want to repeat that with 40v tools. By the way,another fan of Silky hand saws here.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by dman_mb1 View Post
    Anyone have experience with the Ryobi 40v saw sold at Home Depot? I have their string trimmer and it's excellent, so I'd really like to keep the same batteries and charger if I add to my 40v collection. I started my19.2v tools with a Craftsman impact driver, then added some more Craftsman, but in hindsight I maybe should have cut my losses and gone with a different brand. The drills, drivers and reciprocal saw I have are just fine, but Craftsman doesn't offer the variety of 19.2 tools as some other brands, and I don't want to repeat that with 40v tools. By the way,another fan of Silky hand saws here.
    See post #14. It's a great saw.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCWages View Post
    See post #14. It's a great saw.
    Oops, missed that. Thanks!

  67. #67
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    The electric saws do well, but the leather face dance just isn't as cool without the 2 stroke wine and smoke.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by hatfield44 View Post
    The electric saws do well, but the leather face dance just isn't as cool without the 2 stroke wine and smoke.
    Where do I buy some of this 2-stroke wine? I'd like to try it; is it a red or a white?
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  69. #69
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    oops
    From the Sunoco vineyard in smart ass valley.
    They have a 60:1 white or a 16:1 red.
    The older vintages have a stronger varnish aftertaste.

  70. #70
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    For the Greenworks guys, have you also used this? If so... sturdy for light-weight brushing or POS?

    G-MAX 20 Inch 40V Cordless Pole Hedge Trimmer-22342

    I like the idea of using the same battery for both the saw and the trimmer. If there's another brand that has both options folks recommend, I'm all ears.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_Beer View Post
    For the Greenworks guys, have you also used this? If so... sturdy for light-weight brushing or POS?

    G-MAX 20 Inch 40V Cordless Pole Hedge Trimmer-22342

    I like the idea of using the same battery for both the saw and the trimmer. If there's another brand that has both options folks recommend, I'm all ears.
    Yes, see this thread:
    Trimming back trail over growth

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_Beer View Post
    For the Greenworks guys, have you also used this? If so... sturdy for light-weight brushing or POS?

    G-MAX 20 Inch 40V Cordless Pole Hedge Trimmer-22342

    I like the idea of using the same battery for both the saw and the trimmer. If there's another brand that has both options folks recommend, I'm all ears.
    Just be sure you get the "G-Max" 40 volt units; Greenworks also has had "plain" 40 volt L-Ion units---the "G-Max" and "plain" batteries/tools/chargers are not interchangeable. The "plain" units are more on the POS side of things.

    The only thing I haven't liked about the G-Max system is that the batteries are pretty sensitive to getting wet. I've lost 2 (one 4.0 and one 2.0) both from being left out overnight and picking up the morning dew. I'd never attempt to use one of these tools in the rain.

    If water does get on them it needs to be wiped off immediately; if it wicks into the battery management circuitry it's a goner. {I've taken the dead packs apart to see if the problem was something I could fix)
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  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Empty_Beer View Post
    For the Greenworks guys, have you also used this? If so... sturdy for light-weight brushing or POS?

    G-MAX 20 Inch 40V Cordless Pole Hedge Trimmer-22342

    I like the idea of using the same battery for both the saw and the trimmer. If there's another brand that has both options folks recommend, I'm all ears.
    We use the G-Max 40v pole saw at work and it works great. I wanted to try it for a bit before I bought the hedge trimmer.

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