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  1. #1
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    Chainsaw substitute silky katanaboy folding saw

    So for some reason, I don't know why, I find cutting down trees fun. So I was tired to cutting 12"+ inch trees with a 9 1/2 inch folding saw. So I was thinking of getting a chainsaw but I really like ALL my fingers and I know they are not allowed in some trails. So I did some looking on the net and I found the silky katanaboy folding saw. it is a two handed 19 1/2 inch folding saw that is made by one of the top saw makers in the world. so I order one from Forestry Suppliers, Inc. 800-647-5368 and I have used it on a few 10" to 12" inch trees and this thing works great! here is some photos and a video of I made of it.








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  2. #2
    please, just ride
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    COTA Has been using these for the last year or so with great results. The nice thing is that you can take one on your regular bike ride and not have to deal with saw, oil,gas, files, chaps and other PPE. You can't get everything with the Katana Boy but We have been impressed with what we can cut out with them. Four guys with different size Silkys can bust it out pretty good on a ride.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by seedy View Post
    .............. Four guys with different size Silkys can bust it out pretty good on a ride.
    Sounds like a porno.

  4. #4
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    Wow, $184 for the saw and $90 replacement blades. I love buying trail toys but I don't think I can rationalize that much money for a portable hand saw. I have had good luck with the smaller but similar Gerber Double Joint folding saw. Two-handed handle, 13 inch blade and $29.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chainsaw substitute silky katanaboy folding saw-gerber-double-joint-folding-saw.jpg  


  5. #5
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    ya, I was on the fence about spending that much money for a "had saw". I had the money saved up to buy a chainsaw but I thought I would give it a shot and it is great! that is why I wanted to make the post. if you need to cut trees that are "to big for a hand saw" then this is the way to go. also if you need a chainsaw but are not allowed to used one on that trail (the problem I had) then this will get the job done. you can cut trees that only a two man cross cut saw or chainsaw can handle.
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  6. #6
    El Pollo Diablo
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    Cool toy!
    Must comment though, that you are the trail equivalent of the guy who rides to the grocery store and does his shopping with his helmet still on.
    Dork!

  7. #7
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    Great saw

    The magnum hand saw! Thanks for the info.

  8. #8
    I like bikes
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    Like the samurai sword of folding saws. I give folding saws out to my volunteers to keep in their packs. Gotta keep the costs down, but cool tool nonetheless.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnowMongoose View Post
    Cool toy!
    Must comment though, that you are the trail equivalent of the guy who rides to the grocery store and does his shopping with his helmet still on.
    Dork!
    why I keep my helmet on. first is I sweat a LOT, and I like how the sweat runs off the front of the helmet and not down my face, also I don't like to put my helmet back on after is is drench in sweat, and it the fall, spring and winter it gets really cold fast and make that even worse. and the last reason is that I allways leave it on when cutting trees because of falling branches (even thought that tree was on the ground, some of them are not, so it is a good ideal to keep it on when ever cutting trees) so ones the helmet gos on, it stays on untill the rides is over.
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  10. #10
    Single Speed Junkie
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    The Katana is a cool saw, but as others have pointed out expensive. If it were half the cost then I could see it. For a less expensive option the Silky Big Boy is a great saw as well and only slightly smaller.

    Silky Bigboy - Length 14.17" for ~$60 with $30 replacement blades
    or
    Silky Katanaboy - Length 19.5" for ~$180 with $90 replacement blade.

    I've taken out 12" diameter trees with the big boy nearly just as easily as with a longer blade. For the added 5.33" it is not worth the added $120 in cost to me personally.

    I do like how you did the videos though.

  11. #11
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    I can see how the saws would be lighter and safer than the chain saws...can someone educate me on the smart way to use the nylon wedges to enhance the cutting experience so that the saw does not become pinched when you are bucking the downed trees? I am thinking that there are some general rules about wedge placement.

  12. #12
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    I've been using the OregonPower Now Battery powered chainsaw. It rocks! Kind of pricey once again but it works damn great!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by roguehoe View Post
    I can see how the saws would be lighter and safer than the chain saws...can someone educate me on the smart way to use the nylon wedges to enhance the cutting experience so that the saw does not become pinched when you are bucking the downed trees? I am thinking that there are some general rules about wedge placement.

    think physics. and where is gravity going to pull down. if there is nothing holding the log up and you start cutting thru, the log is going to fall down and pinch the blade. you can place the wedge at the top of the cut so they don't come together. there is some other cuts you can make, but i don't know how to desribe them. How is gravity going to affect what you are cutting? that is what needs to be going thru your brain. As far as using wedges to drop the trees, you really should have someone show you how. it can be dangerous. if you are dropping a tree and you pinch you blade. you can always take the blade off of the saw and use more wedges to help get your bar out. And if the tree does come down, it wont take out the motor of the saw.

  14. #14
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    thanks..that is pretty much what I have been doing..I was just looking for other tricks/tips about the wedges that someone with more experience would have. I rarely have the need to fall a tree, but there are lots of blowdowns thanks to the pine beetle infestation we had a few years ago.

  15. #15
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    i will try and explain how i do it without wedges.

    The log is parellel to the ground but not on the ground. I will make a downward cut in the log to roughly the half way point or a little more. when i see the log starting to pinch, i stop and pull the bar out of the log. I than move over a couple of inches, depending on size of log and cut at an angle towards my first cut. I than remove that wedge. I than go back to the area of the original cut and finish cutting thru the log. That way when one side drops, there is no material to catch on.

    typing and writing are not my strong point. i hope this makes sense.

  16. #16
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    Yes, I have seen this done before...seems to be good technique. Thanks for sharing.

  17. #17
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    I like the 15 inch sven saw about 30 bucks weighs about a pound. It's nice to be able to clean up trails without having to wait for crews. I Love wood tools

  18. #18
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    I cut the biggest tree yet over the week end. I used all 20" of the saw to get this done (the tree was not 20" but you need some room on the saw to go back and forth)








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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyM14 View Post
    I cut the biggest tree yet over the week end. I used all 20" of the saw to get this done (the tree was not 20" but you need some room on the saw to go back and forth)
    Wow, that's impressive. How long did that take? I've been packing a battery powered chainsaw that rocks but this saw could be useful for a lot of the smaller stuff.

  20. #20
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    I was there for about an hour, but I was only cutting for about 20 minutes. I an not in shape enough to cut non stop and it was very hot with 100% humidly so I was taking it slow.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyM14 View Post
    I cut the biggest tree yet over the week end. I used all 20" of the saw to get this done (the tree was not 20" but you need some room on the saw to go back and forth)
    Chevy:

    How long has that log been down? It amazes me how long it takes people to do some trail maintenance. Great Work You have to wonder why pepole have to pay to go to the gym

  22. #22
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    Lass then a week as far as I know.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyM14 View Post
    I was there for about an hour, but I was only cutting for about 20 minutes. I an not in shape enough to cut non stop and it was very hot with 100% humidly so I was taking it slow.
    Love the saw, love the thread. If I rode places I couldn't use a chainsaw, a saw of this caliber would be a consideration.

    Going to the title of the thread though, chainsaw substitute, that last tree is a 7 minute project with a chainsaw, that includes putting on and taking off all the proper protective gear from a Bob trailer. I wouldn't consider 20 minutes to one hour a "substitute". It's a poor compromise, one forced upon you by your land manager. I just though I'd mention this in case a land manager reads this thread and says "see, we don't need volunteers using chainsaws!"

    I use a hand saw on occasional blow-down softwoods under 7" and hardwood under 6". In those situations, I feel I can cut through the log with my handsaw, a $20 Corona from Lowes, faster than I can unload the chainsaw from the Bob, gear up, start it, un-gear, and repack the Bob.

    I do want a Silky Big Boy.
    Last edited by Fattirewilly; 08-28-2012 at 06:16 AM.
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  24. #24
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    That's an impressive folding saw. How does it compare to a hand-powered chain saw?

  25. #25
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fattirewilly View Post
    Love the saw, love the thread. If I rode places I couldn't use a chainsaw, a saw of this caliber would be a consideration.

    Going to the title of the thread though, chainsaw substitute, that last tree is a 7 minute project with a chainsaw, that includes putting on and taking off all the proper protective gear from a Bob trailer. I wouldn't consider 20 minutes to one hour a "substitute". It's a poor compromise, one forced upon you by your land manager. I just though I'd mention this in case a land manager reads this thread and says "see, we don't need volunteers using chainsaws!"

    I use a hand saw on occasional blow-down softwoods under 7" and hardwood under 6". In those situations, I feel I can cut through the log with my handsaw, a $20 Corona from Lowes, faster than I can unload the chainsaw from the Bob, gear up, start it, un-gear, and repack the Bob.

    I do want a Silky Big Boy.

    I think my Fanno 30" Bull Saw is a good chainsaw substute. It rides in a leather scabboard that straps to my bike frame and takes 15 minutes to cut a 12" deadfall. I'll be done before you even get there with your bob'n saw.
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