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  1. #26
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    The folding saws have the edge in weight, and they never run out of juice (the people running them - that's another story...), and can be carried around all the time to take care of the unexpected fallen tree. If it's known work - I've had great luck with a cordless sawzall. I have the Makita 18 volt LTX, and use 12" blades. 1 battery can usually take care of 3 or 4 cuts through decent sized hardwood.

    The downside is weight, and when the batteries die you're done. As a side note - Unless I can see clear sky all around me, I leave my helmet on when working on blowdowns. More than once clearing out a blowdown other stuff came down with it...

  2. #27
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    Very cool! I didn't know folding saw that size exist. As for cost, I've never priced chainsaws (never bought one). Can you get a good chainsaw for $180? (I thought they were considerably more?)

    I have a small Gerber folding saw, and I can easily cut things up to 6" in diameter with it (maybe a bit more).

    Fortunately, in my experience, 90% of the stuff I find that I want to cut is 6" or smaller...so the small folding saw works fine.

    As to the argument that a 7-minute chainsaw job = a 20-minute handsaw job, I've got no problem with that. I like the exercise of a handsaw...and unless I'm in a huge rush (like an hour before a big race with several trees down across the trail)...I've got plenty of time, and don't feel like making a pile of noise pollution (as well as CO2) in the woods.

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  3. #28
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    I have the Silky Gomboy 300mm. Just less than 12" long blade and folds to less than 13", VERY SHARP. When cleaning trails I ride with it in my back pocket and sharp pruning shears in my other back pocket. I can walk the trail and use the saw for removing fallen branches without bending over, very versatile. I think it was $50.00 new and a replacement blade was around $33.00.
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  4. #29
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    I have a Silky Bigboy, as do a few other trail crew members in the local club. Nice thing about folding saws like this is they are light enough and small enough to always carry in your camelback, so when you find deadfall on the trail, you can quickly deal with it, before ride-around trail braids become established.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    I think my Fanno 30" Bull Saw is a good chainsaw substute. It rides in a leather scabboard that straps to my bike frame and takes 15 minutes to cut a 12" deadfall. I'll be done before you even get there with your bob'n saw.
    Good one! Yup, you could probably cut it with a butter knife before I get there w/ a bob'n saw.
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  6. #31
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    Impressive folder!

    I have never gotten a good feeling from the folders I have tried, and I prefer a smaller one handed saw.

    I carry one of the non-foldable 13" corona saws in a kydex sheath. I ziptie this to the outside of my camelbak since it's longer than the internal storage compartment. Forrestry Supply sells them for about $40 with the sheath.

  7. #32
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    had no idea you could chop such big logs with such a compact saw. will have to get one of these!

  8. #33
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    ... and if we just ... I'm going to try that! :D

    Hey, thanks to the OP for posting his video and thoughts, and for everyone who has shared their perspective - you all have inspired me to buy this type of saw to remove some trees that are blocking the Santa Anna River Trail, just east of Angeles Oaks!

    And because I love tools, I bought both the Silky Katanaboy and Bigboy models, to see for myself if the extra length is worth the extra cost and/or the trouble to carry. Also, I'm typically riding with at least one other person, so I don't want to hog all the fun out there - this way, others can join in on the woodcutting!

  9. #34
    jalepenio jimenez
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    roguehoe, what is it you don't understand about using plastic falling wedges? I understand you aren't falling trees, but rather bucking through fallen trees on or above the ground.

    the wedge should be put in to the kerf behind the saw blade/bar to keep the kerf open (so as not to close and pinch the blade/bar.)

    if you have room to insert the wedge into the cut and whack it in with a 3"- 4" tree limb (or axe, rock, etc.) then you will be able to benefit from the use of a wedge. the wedge is only keeping the cut open.

    if the tree is supported at each end and you need to cut it in the middle, that is where the wedge will work for you..., but, it's best to use an under-buck to finish the cut, even if you have set a wedge in the top cut.

    the compression forces generated at the top of the tree where you will be putting a wedge are so great that often a wedge is useless, and your saw will be pinched solid no matter what as you attempt to saw from the top down.

    with a wedge in the topside, you can usually cut down 3/4 of the way no problem.

    it's best to finish the cut from the bottom up, and that looks like one of the advantages of chevyM14's saw: it looks like it could handle the final cut safely.

    by finishing the cut from the bottom, you are releasing some incredible tension that has built up in the bottom side of the tree as you've cut down from the top in the first cut.

    usually, the tension is so great that the tree snaps rather quickly as you begin your under-buck. don't be in it's way.
    I dig, chop, strangle, yank, stomp, annihilate, mutilate, eradicate, and FU goatheads

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWriverstone View Post
    Very cool! I didn't know folding saw that size exist. As for cost, I've never priced chainsaws (never bought one). Can you get a good chainsaw for $180? (I thought they were considerably more?)
    Silky saws are nice, but be careful on the push stroke. If it jams and bends the blade will probably eventually break at that point. I've broken 2 blades, but I blame myself, I get carried away.

    The silky's are definitely worth the money though IMO. We have a major blowdown problem due to caterpillars killing thousands and thousands of trees about 8-9 years ago. Now every time the wind picks up they fall like matchsticks. I try to carry the handsaw with me all the time but nothing beats a chainsaw. I got a Husqvarna 240 for $199 and it does pretty well. But I've been out cutting with a guy who has the Husqy 455 and that one is a serious saw, much more power and a longer bar. But, it's also twice the money and heavier, and since we carry them in backpacks that's a big deal.
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  11. #36
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    Yep..I see what you are saying. I talked with some experienced sawyers and feel quite confident now. I just wanted to know all the tricks of the trade so to speak. I like working smarter and not harder. Thanks.

  12. #37
    Blargen
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    I have a Silky Bigboy, as do a few other trail crew members in the local club. Nice thing about folding saws like this is they are light enough and small enough to always carry in your camelback, so when you find deadfall on the trail, you can quickly deal with it, before ride-around trail braids become established.
    I picked up a silky bigboy folding saw after reading this thread - love it. It fits easily into my camelback and cuts through pine and redwood like a warm knife through butter. Highly recommended.

  13. #38
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    Need IT!

    Should be nice for setting up NICA courses too.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChevyM14 View Post
    So for some reason, I don't know why, I find cutting down trees fun. So I was tired to cutting 12"+ inch trees with a 9 1/2 inch folding saw. So I was thinking of getting a chainsaw but I really like ALL my fingers and I know they are not allowed in some trails. So I did some looking on the net and I found the silky katanaboy folding saw. it is a two handed 19 1/2 inch folding saw that is made by one of the top saw makers in the world. so I order one from Forestry Suppliers, Inc. 800-647-5368 and I have used it on a few 10" to 12" inch trees and this thing works great! here is some photos and a video of I made of it.








    why would you cut that down when its so easy just to ride over. i love down logs there fun to try to get over with out hitting your chain ring or going OTB.
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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by tevor4 View Post
    why would you cut that down when its so easy just to ride over. i love down logs there fun to try to get over with out hitting your chain ring or going OTB.
    What you like and what the land manager who governs the area requires can differ. It is the old, "the boss is not always right, but he IS always the boss".

    Trailbuilders must work with the land managers to gain and keep trail access.
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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by tevor4 View Post
    why would you cut that down when its so easy just to ride over. i love down logs there fun to try to get over with out hitting your chain ring or going OTB.
    ...also depends on the overall technical difficulty of the trail, and how the tree falls across the trail.

    If the trail is intended to be technically difficult and the tree falls across the trail in a way that 1) it's do-able for the intended trail skill level, 2) it's not easily ridden around and 3) it's stable, not rotten, and unlikely to move, then sure, I agree with you, leave it in place for the added tech factor.

    On the other hand, if the trail is intended to be easy, or the tree is elevated off the ground, or falls at an angle that makes it difficult/dangerous to ride over, or the tree is easily ridden around, or it's rotten and decaying, or it really messes with the flow, then I would remove it.

    In the first 2 pictures, the tree is elevated, at an angle, rotting, easily ridden around on the left, and difficult by most riders to clean on an otherwise buff, low-tech-looking trail. I would remove it before a trail braid gets established on the left.

    The last picture, I can't tell if the tree was a candidate for removal.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    ...also depends on the overall technical difficulty of the trail, and how the tree falls across the trail.

    If the trail is intended to be technically difficult and the tree falls across the trail in a way that 1) it's do-able for the intended trail skill level, 2) it's not easily ridden around and 3) it's stable, not rotten, and unlikely to move, then sure, I agree with you, leave it in place for the added tech factor.

    On the other hand, if the trail is intended to be easy, or the tree is elevated off the ground, or falls at an angle that makes it difficult/dangerous to ride over, or the tree is easily ridden around, or it's rotten and decaying, or it really messes with the flow, then I would remove it.

    In the first 2 pictures, the tree is elevated, at an angle, rotting, easily ridden around on the left, and difficult by most riders to clean on an otherwise buff, low-tech-looking trail. I would remove it before a trail braid gets established on the left.

    The last picture, I can't tell if the tree was a candidate for removal.
    you are 100% right on every point about this tree. it would have made a bad log roll for anyone of these reasons and it had all of them! "In the first 2 pictures, the tree is elevated, at an angle, rotting, easily ridden around on the left, and difficult by most riders to clean on an otherwise buff, low-tech-looking trail. I would remove it before a trail braid gets established on the left."
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  18. #43
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    So for the guys who've used the 15" and 20" blades, is the larger one worth the extra money, weight and size to pack?
    Bend, OR

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by INABIL View Post
    I have the Silky Gomboy 300mm. Just less than 12" long blade and folds to less than 13", VERY SHARP. When cleaning trails I ride with it in my back pocket and sharp pruning shears in my other back pocket. I can walk the trail and use the saw for removing fallen branches without bending over, very versatile. I think it was $50.00 new and a replacement blade was around $33.00.
    Got one as a gift, awesome trail tool.

  20. #45
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    The 14" (or whatever it is) just barely fits in my C-bak Mule. It's awesome.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by TroyS600 View Post
    So for the guys who've used the 15" and 20" blades, is the larger one worth the extra money, weight and size to pack?
    Obviously the katanaboy is probably amazing, so get one if you want.

    But are you talking about the katanaboy and also the bigboy? Cause' I didn't see a 15" blade katanaboy. I have the bigboy 2000 and it is the best folding saw I've had by far, but it isn't as good as the Corona non-folding pruning saw I used for a while.

    That Corona wouldn't fit inside my pack, and the bigboy does(barely) so that makes the bigboy good for me to carry along to clear deadfall as it pops up. If I was going to prune all day I might bring the Corona because the blade is about twice as thick and doesn't flex like all the folding saws do. The Corona is a 14" blade and it got dull eventually so I use it around the house only.

    My point is, if you are going to get the 20" blade and strap it to your pack, why not get non-folder and do the same, it will be cheaper and better than every other folding saw. Silky has some real nice non-folders it looks like, if you want better than corona, and you can pick any length you want. Just make sure you get a scabbard with it, I homeade one and it wasn't the best.

  22. #47
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    With the spring trail maintenance season starting, I picked up a 14" Silky Bigboy and a 10" Corona Razor for comparison, figuring I’d use the silky for the early season cleanup and the Corona as an everyday pack saw.

    The Silky is built like a tank and pretty hefty, being all metal except for the rubber handle covering material, which provides a great grip. It has two locking positions for the blade to accommodate varying cutting angles, but oddly, the blade doesn't lock in the closed position, which can be a bit of a safety concern, depending on how you carry it. The blade pivot is very tight, so the blade isn’t likely to move unless it’s jarred pretty hard.

    The Corona is plastic except for the blade and its pivot and lacks the solid feel of the Silky. The grip material only covers about half of the handle and it’s not very tacky, but the flare and curve at the end provide a solid grip in use. The blade locks both open (1 position) and closed.

    Comparing the blades, the tooth size is essentially the same, with the Corona being slightly finer pitched (7 tpi vs. 6.5 for the Silky). Both are incredibly sharp. The Corona was more polished and the back of the blade had smoothly rounded edges. The Silky blade has sharp edges on the back that took a few minutes with 400 grit sandpaper to smooth.

    With both saws, some of the blade teeth are partially exposed when the saw is closed, so you don’t want to pack them close to anything delicate or that could snag on the blade.

    In use, they both cut very quickly, with the Silky having an advantage only because of it’s 4” longer stroke (13 5/8” across the teeth, vs. 9 5/8”). After a quick test on a fresh 2” poplar branch, it was time to hit the trail. The first tree I cut with the Silky as a nice test, a 10” live pine that had been blown down only a month prior. It took me about 15 minutes to make two cuts to remove a 4’ section, including time for resting and panting. Not that it really matters, but I was amazed at how smooth the cut surfaces were and really impressed with the saw’s performance. I didn’t need to cut anything else on that ride, but that was enough to gauge its performance.

    I took the Corona out the next day and we encountered quite a bit of downed wood that tested the capacity of the smaller saw. It worked fine on both live and dead pine up to 8” in diameter. On the bigger stuff, I missed the Silky, but with a bit more effort the Corona did the job. Overall, it performed really well.

    The bottom line? The saws will do exactly what I had hoped. The Silky is ideal for the early maintenance season and larger trees. Its construction will ensure that it lasts for years. The Corona’s light weight and outsized performance will make it a great daily companion for the rest of the season. And the other bottom line? At $50 on Amazon, you get what you pay for with the Silky Bigboy. However, the Corona was only 20 bucks at Lowes and performs nearly as well, which makes it an outstanding value.

    Both saws will fit in a typical hydration pack and I intend to carry the Corona that way, but for spring cleanup where they’ll get used a lot, I wanted a quicker to access carry method. I used some 1/1/4” PVC pipe and a heat gun to create a couple of mounting brackets that will attach to water bottle mounts. You can see them in the following post:

    Handsaw Mounted On Bike

    The Corona can also be stuffed into a wide-mouthed water bottle for a “quick and dirty” carrying solution.
    Last edited by Bnystrom; 03-13-2014 at 08:43 PM. Reason: fixing typos

  23. #48
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    A bunch of use use a Thomson Seat Post Stem bag to keep our Corona Saws in.

  24. #49
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    I guess great minds think alike!

    That's exactly what I do when I don't have the saw mounted on the bike or on the outside of my pack. I guess that's just one more good reason to buy Thompson posts.

    Are you using the bags with folding or fixed-blade saws?

    The silky got a workout today, but nothing we encountered would have been more than the Corona could handle.

  25. #50
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    I use the Thompson bag with the Corona folding. I have a larger Corona fixed saw that came with a Cardboard cover. I saved the cover and wrapped it with Duct Tape to make a cover for that saw. The Corona tools have been dependable and a great Value for the cost. I ride with the folding in my hydration pack when needed. I would never ride with a fixed saw sticking out of my pack.

    Bnystrom is also the name of an awesome and famous Hockey player from the Islanders. He is also a local Mountain Biker.

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