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  1. #1
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    Chainsaw Carrier Recomendations?

    What are people doing for hauling a chainsaw on their mountain bike?

    I've come across the MacKenzie Chainsaw Pack, which look like an option they are fairly pricey.

    I've also seen attachments for ATV's and dirtbikes that may be easily adapted to a MTB with a rear rack...

  2. #2
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    We use a BOB trailer, it's big enough to also carry gas mix, chain oil and other tools.

    IMBA has a special deal for affiliated clubs to get them for near cost.

    http://www.bobgear.com/trailers/trailers.php

    Nashbar has this one on sale for $99 for a limited time. Not sure how construction compares to BOB.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...All%20Products

    I extend our capacity by putting a plastic milk crate in the bed, then use lots of bungies.

    Don't forget the safety equipment:

    http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/dr...ry.asp?cat=204

    Chain saw chaps will stop the blade in a second before it cuts into your leg too deep.
    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    www.IMBA.com
    NY State Trails Council Member

  3. #3
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    Check out the builders pack by Dakine

    link
    review (by nsmb)
    for sale (at pricepoint)

    *edit* Picture taken from the nsmb review
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
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    Thanks sick4surf, we have 2 bob trailers now, but my saw usually gets covered in mud when I pull it around in there.

    The dakine pack looks like it would work great! Thanks x-ker...
    Last edited by jmitchell13; 03-18-2008 at 08:42 PM.

  5. #5
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    I have a BOB that I have used and just (three days ago) received a Dakine Builder bag. I am pretty excited to use it, but I have to say that it seems as though chainsaw pocket was built for a pretty small saw (Of course, that photo from NSMB proves me wrong!) We have a Stihl 250 which isn't that big but the hand guard doesn't fit completely in the hole and the handle doesn't slide down as well as I hoped. Its certainly better than some of the rigged set ups I have seen and the construction of the bag is great.
    For our BOB, we built a wooden box set up with tie downs and also slots for a Pulaski and a McCloud. It works pretty well, but I don't know about mud.

    edit I just went and read the NSMB review, I think I'll back off on the smack talk until I have the bag in the woods. I guess its just bar envy or something...

  6. #6
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    I have a backpack that I line with cardboard on the bottom and against my back. I also use a bob trailer. I cut down a broken bike fender and put it on the bob,it works well. I also use bungy cords to support the saw,it helps to absorb shock to the saw. Let me know if you want a photo of the fender.
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  7. #7
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    You can always put the chain saw in a garbage bag to protect from the mud. The dakine pack looks cool.
    Michael Vitti
    CLIMB President
    www.CLIMBonline.org
    www.IMBA.com
    NY State Trails Council Member

  8. #8
    zrm
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    I use a BOB and carry my saw inside its case to protect it. I dunno, but I would never carry a saw on my back while riding a bike.The thought of having the blade, even if it had some kind of shield over it makes me shiver. Not to mention I personally don't like lots of weight on my back while riding and my smaller saw, a Sthil 026 with an 18" bar, is more weight than I'd want to carry but that's just me, some folks are fine with heavy back packs. I'd rather use the trailer..

    I do have an old external frame backpack withoutthe bag that I can rig up with bungees and cam straps to carry awrkward loads like a saw for hiking which I usually do if I have less than tree or four miles.

  9. #9
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by th29
    That looks like a decent idea. I had come across that article shortly after starting this thread.

    Keep the ideas coming...
    Last edited by jmitchell13; 03-21-2008 at 09:19 PM.

  11. #11
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    When I was a wildland fire fighter, we made our own. It was a simple scabbard to be worn on the back like a backpack. The saw was carried bar down with the power head between the shoulder blades. We used scrap fire hose for the bar, and some heavy plastic as a frame. We riveted old pack straps to it and it was good to go.

    It worked well with the motor up, because we carried all of the rest of our gear on on web gear belt. The swamper carried a pack with fuel, bar oil, and tools.

    Sorry, I don't have any pictures.

  12. #12
    jalepenio jimenez
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    Don't forget, you can always take the bar and chain off of the powerhead and carry your saw that way. Drop the PH into the bottom of your pack, slide the bar in alongside it along with the chain (off of the bar) and you have a much more consolidated package with no exposed sawchain protruding out to lacerate your tires, arms or legs in case of sudden dismounts.
    Reassembly only takes a few minutes and also gives you time to look over your clutch, drivers and oil port to ensure all is in working order.
    Here is a tip from me, an old log cutter from Idaho: if you've ever pinched your saw in a cut to the point where it is stuck fast, carrying an extra old bar and chain may save the day for you. Just remove the PH from pinched bar and reassemble with extra bar and chain and you are back in business. Beats chopping with an axe or going for another saw.
    I dig, chop, strangle, yank, stomp, annihilate, mutilate, eradicate, and FU goatheads

  13. #13
    WTF.......
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    The Co-Op also has tons of packs at a reasonable price. I have the one with dual carbon spines for support and load it with about 75lbs (nails, tools, food, water, saw) for large days. Its pretty beat down now but has served me well for 5 years or so.

  14. #14
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    I also use a milk crate in a BOB trailer....I cut a couple of slots in the crate and the saw slides down into it....has worked well for 2 years. Even with the saw in the crate, there is room for some fuel, oil, etc.

  15. #15
    Sheepherder/Cat Herder Moderator
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    for mud...mount a fender on the arm that connects the BOB to your bike AND put a fender on the BOB trailer itself...for its wheel. Hope that makes sense.
    ...building wherever they'll let me...

  16. #16
    Wiz
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    Ski specific packs & their on sale now

    I use my (old) Dakine Chute. Any ski pack w/sleeves (or even Daisey chains) works great. They are tough & don't rip like lite fast packs. You can load em w/everything, slip the handle end in the lower loop (binding area) then strap the bar end diagonally with the adjustable tip strap. I got a picture somewhere. Works awesome & convenient for multiple quick stop-N-gos. To keep it stable;e, a little webbing never hurts & setting web length w/loops and carabiners is a snap. Leaves plenty of room for fuel, tools & beers. Trailer is sweet, however not for my general work clearing multiple blow downs on ST.

    You can never have enough packs anyway, I could use 5 more.

    Gotta look for that photo, pretty hardcore even the hunters were avoiding me...Rrrrr!

  17. #17
    RXL
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    Here's my carrier mounted on the back of my winter/ trail maintenance bike.

    A chunk of poplar, spare tube, some hockey tape, handful of copper roof nails, a saw guard, and a couple of carriage bolts/ wingnuts for easy removal.





  18. #18
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    the final idea is sweet. you still using this set up?
    Its the internet...we all sleep with supermodels.

  19. #19
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    Here's a similar set-up that our local USFS trails crew uses. Note the fuel filled water bottles, and the block of wood giving extra height for the use of the long bar. It's simple, but works if you're not trying to haul ass downhill.

    I love mankind - it's people I can't stand. ~Charles M. Schulz

  20. #20
    Err
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    I use an old Dakine Heli-Pro pack to carry my saw. Using the snowboard straps, I point the blade down and run the upper strap around the handle and the lower strap around the blade (inside a scabbard). I can fit a McLeod and a Pulaski on the outside of the pack as well with room inside for extra fuel (MSR fuel bottle), bar oil, chain, spark plug, wrench, gloves, water, food and, of course, beer. I tend to work on trails that would be pretty hard to get down with a Bob otherwise, that would be a nice option.

  21. #21
    RXL
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    Quote Originally Posted by greg de taos
    the final idea is sweet. you still using this set up?
    thanks. used it this morning to clear some deadfall.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by RXL
    thanks. used it this morning to clear some deadfall.
    Thanks everyone for the pics! I think my winter project will be to build a couple of these.^

  23. #23
    I build my own.
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    A rectangular plastic waste basket (like in an office) in the bottom of your pack will keep anything from "eating" through. Put a little padding between it and your back. It will keep spilled fuel from burning your skin too.

  24. #24
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    I like the idea of using the rack th hold the saw it's slick.

    One way Ive been using a 12 foot long webbing and my chaps to tie the saw to my back. Start with putting the saw on the ground with the brake plate up. Slide the webbing under so equal lenghts and on each side. Fold up the chaps and put them on the flat brake plate and secure with a simple over hand knot, just like when you start to tie your shoes. grab the webbing on either side of the saw and get it against your back. The saw hangs bar down with the motor between my shoulder blades. The two free ends of webbing go over your shoulders, around your back and then secure in the front with a square knot. Over time the straps can get tight, but no to the point where I have to readjust. I use this for big saws and long distances.

    The second way is using one or two dog leashes. Tie one to the cross bar and then to the handle. Ware it like a sling and adjust it so its comfortable. I use this method when I have alot of cutting. The second leash a second leash can be tied to the cross bar and then secured in the front, this can help keep the saw in one place. I like dog leashes cause you can always find them on trails, and they have thousands of uses.

    Both these methods can be used to cary hand tools.

    For a good scabard go to the local fire departments and ask for scrap 2 1/2 inch hose. Offer beer or fatty foods and they are more likely to find stuff laying around they don't need. This will slide over most saw bars. Use an old shoe lace to tie it to the cross bar or it can fall off.

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