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  1. #1
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    Bush opens Mountain Bike Acess to National Parks

    i've always grumbled that the guy never lifted a finger to help mountain biking out. Now i cannot make that case so much.

    Beyond this, how outstanding would this be. There's been so much good news lately on the national front of mountain biking access i have to pinch myself. Still where i'm at in Washington State we're still threatened with losing access to hundreds of miles of backcountry trail (mostly to Wilderness Designation Cancer), but it's so good to hear positive news.

    As far as we're concerned here, Mount St. Helens was being seriously considered as having it's designation revised to a National Park. So this is where this decision would have a pretty immediate impact as we would have the capability to preserve around 70 miles of trails for mountain biking.

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/nation...in_biking.html
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  2. #2
    zrm
    zrm is offline
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    It won't have an immediate effect on existing trails in parks. It doesn't "open" national parks to mountain bikes. It gives local superintendents the authority to do so in the units they are responsible for. There would still be a process, although I'm not sure it would be a full blown NEPA or not.

    National Monuments, are still under the authority of the Park service but administered under a different set of rules than parks. they do tend to have less restrictions on bikes (and a lot of other things) than parks, but that's not a given. As I read it, however, it will give a superintendent more latitude to grandfather trails that are currently open to mountain bikes if a monument becomes a park.

    Don't expect to start riding lots of singletrack in National parks anytime soon though.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm
    It won't have an immediate effect on existing trails in parks. It doesn't "open" national parks to mountain bikes. It gives local superintendents the authority to do so in the units they are responsible for. There would still be a process, although I'm not sure it would be a full blown NEPA or not.

    National Monuments, are still under the authority of the Park service but administered under a different set of rules than parks. they do tend to have less restrictions on bikes (and a lot of other things) than parks, but that's not a given. As I read it, however, it will give a superintendent more latitude to grandfather trails that are currently open to mountain bikes if a monument becomes a park.

    Don't expect to start riding lots of singletrack in National parks anytime soon though.
    Yup, advocating will likely be a necessity in order to open up any existing trails that are deemed appropriate for mountain bike use.

    And again the unjust ban of mountain bikes from Wilderness Designation is also a dampener for the promise of trail openings. Wilderness makes up virtually the entire percentage of Washington States current National Park Land.

    But how many people thought that this day would realistically come, to where we could actually advocate for access on singletrack in Parks? The very fact that this is now possible have huge positive ramifications for mountain bikers.
    Last edited by Skookum; 10-16-2008 at 10:16 AM.
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