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  1. #26
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    We have already decided against chicken wire, because of the chance for tire punctures down the road. We have talked about tar paper, and will address after they are built and it becomes a issue.
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  2. #27
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    I just rode the 24hrs of Adrenaline in Canmore. The Nordic Centre had many wood bridges and boardwalks for us to ride. They used concrete wire and sandwiched the edges of the wire between wood. I would suppose they also use nail-on staples to hole it down. This is much heavier gauge, but does a great job for traction, as it was wet at times on the ride.


    If you go to their photos page you can scroll through and find some shots of what I'm talking about.https://www.facebook.com/pages/24-Ho...09625625787403
    Last edited by ghglenn; 07-23-2012 at 08:24 AM.

  3. #28
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    From what I've read in here it looks like you have most, if not all of your answers. 2.5" sounds way too big for the conditions you have mentioned. 1-1.5" is definitely the largest you want to go. As for the grip issue, you CAN use chicken wire if you apply it correctly. It also depends how much traffic the trails will see, more traffic=more wear and tear on the wire. Your other alternative is the textured paint/cement as mentioned earlier. (a better option no doubt)
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMHZ2401 View Post
    These bridges are not meant for horses. We do have horses in the area and they have the fire roads. Since cutting the first trails we have had a couple horses check out some of our trails and we have put up temp bike only signs which seem to have worked.

    So we are not building the bridges for horses. Bikes and people, mostly bikes.

    I personally like the 1 inch gap on the boards, but others think the 2.5 inch gap will help scare the horses away. Hopefully the bridges will scare them off regardless.
    You never know when an equestrian might be from a foreign country that doesn't understand a "NO HORSES" sign, so you better make the tread out of 8X8's, then you won't need a stringer, if you use a 36' width.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    You never know when an equestrian might be from a foreign country that doesn't understand a "NO HORSES" sign, so you better make the tread out of 8X8's, then you won't need a stringer, if you use a 36' width.
    Sign can include picture of horse with the standard red circle with a line thru it. That pretty much would cover everyone except blind equestrians
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  6. #31
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    I'm just curious. Who owns the property you are building these trails/bridges?
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by pascale27 View Post
    Sign can include picture of horse with the standard red circle with a line thru it. That pretty much would cover everyone except blind equestrians
    I find that anyone who wants to ignore any sign on any trail will do so, regardless of mode of transport, language spoken, or physical abilities.

  8. #33
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    True but atleast the builders "should" be covered if a horsey has an accident on the bridge.
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  9. #34
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    On the bridge we just built we used rough sawn 2x6. The rough sawn gives you an extra 1/2" of thickness and it has better traction than finished lumber. It can be cheaper too since it saves a step. Just make sure it doesn't have ground contact. You could probably use a PT at each end if that's an issue. We used 3/4" gap. We had a gauge/tool that was a 3/4" board that had had 2 pieces of scrap nailed to it to set the distance from the stringer, the decking and set the gap.

  10. #35
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    I love the rough sawn stuff. A few local warehouses get it at braces for the deliveries in trailers, and they usually cut it up and throw it out. I have them save it and I pick up 100+ boards every few months. They usually pay people OT to come in on a Saturday to cut it up and toss it in the dumpster, so it is win win for everyone. I use if for most the decking on the structures I build but I do stain it first.

  11. #36
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    Just finished a bridge here in the PNW and we reclaimed downed cedar and axe split the decking boards. Traction is great dry or wet and cedar lasts a long time. I've used the rough sawn cedar as well, and will sometimes score it a bit more with a chainsaw for extra traction.


  12. #37
    gran jefe
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    that has a really nice look, woodway.

  13. #38
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    For traction try epoxy based paint topped with sand
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  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boulder Pilot View Post
    I'm just curious. Who owns the property you are building these trails/bridges?
    County property.
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  15. #40
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    I helped with this recent bridge project in Downieville, CA
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Building bridges-016a.jpg  


  16. #41
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    2x6 or 2x8 decking. Coated deck screws. I use play sand mixed with exterior latex floor paint for traction if using smooth PT decking. On the Cedar, Western Red Cedar is very rot resistant. Eastern Red Cedar is not.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    I helped with this recent bridge project in Downieville, CA
    Is that pressure treated plywood ?
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  18. #43
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    I've been building bridges lately (on public land) using a USFS engineers plan. Depending on length and width, we use 2x12's glue laminated and nailed together in doubles, triples or quadruples. The quads are effing heavy! Depending on application, equestrian or bike, we deck them with 4 inch rough cut or 2 inch rough cut treated pine.

    Will post pics as soon as my post count is higher!

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    I helped with this recent bridge project in Downieville, CA
    Where's the pic of him riding the white skinny past the guy in purple?

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by M5Tucker View Post
    Way to make the rest of us humble builders look bad, Zachi Beautiful stuff! I was supposed be around Nevada City this weekend for some riding & camping but injury put rest to those plans.
    Hey Tucker,

    Sorry to hear about your injury.

    That wood banked turn at the fasta project is some awesome action.

    Hope you can make it up again sometime.

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  21. #46
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    I wanted to update this. We got the bridges built. Turned out pretty good I think. We might have to make a few small adjustments. Here is a couple pictures, and some of these were taken while we were still doing the work. I have not been back to the area since this day due to weather, and not having a bike to ride right now.

    The first bridge into the trail.


    The second bridge on the trail


    Third bridge on the trail.


    The last bridge ciming out of the trail.


    The same last bridge but while on it.


    Also the last bridge looking back into the trail.


    We were able to build 4 bridges in about 4 hours. This included cutting the boards.
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  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by snug dug View Post
    I've been building bridges lately (on public land) using a USFS engineers plan. Depending on length and width, we use 2x12's glue laminated and nailed together in doubles, triples or quadruples. The quads are effing heavy! Depending on application, equestrian or bike, we deck them with 4 inch rough cut or 2 inch rough cut treated pine.

    Will post pics as soon as my post count is higher!
    Here's a 20 foot long by 8 foot wide equestrian bridge. We build all our bridges like this and narrow the width depending on use.
    glue laminated and nailed 2x12 stringers and 8x8 sleepers


    installing blocking, 1/4 inch angle plates visible that lock the stringers down


    stream bank armoring, done first!


    getting ready to deck 4"x8"x8' rough cut decking


    decked, handrails up, face plates on, just need to ramp up with dirt, rock and stone

  23. #48
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    Those turned out really very nice! Are the stringers treated? Either way they're beefy enough, they should last awhile.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by TFitz View Post
    Those turned out really very nice! Are the stringers treated? Either way they're beefy enough, they should last awhile.
    Definitely treated. I don't know how much difference it makes in the long run, but we ask our suppliers to provide materials that at a minimum meet UC4B use category, which apply to these conditions: Ground contact or fresh water. Critical components or difficult replacement.

  25. #50
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    a few more

    Here's a 4 foot wide by 20 foot long bridge built the same way as the 8 foot wide by 20 foot long.


    Here's a hybrid bridge/puncheon


    Here's a puncheon

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