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  1. #1
    Cutlery Fiend
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    Best McLeod Tool? Best Value McLeod tool?

    What would you say is the very best McLeod Tool? And what would you say is the best value in a Mcleod tool?

  2. #2
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    I always liked the ZAC, but they aren't cheap. Used Coronas and Nupla's but think I like the ZAC better.

  3. #3
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    +1 on the Zac, they have good handles and decent faceplate steel. I own Corna, Nupla, Lamberton, and Zacs.

    The Corna steel is probably higher quaility that the Zac which if you are soil with a lot of rock content might be an advantage. (The tines on the Corna's seem to get bent a lot less than the Zacs. But I'm not a big fan of the Corna or any of the bolt on designs, since we have a clay soil which when moist will stick to the face. Zac and other non-bolt on's are easier to clear the soil off the face.

  4. #4
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    I vote for the Zac McLeod not because they work better, they all work pretty much the same, but because of how they stack together. The steel shaft on a Zac McLeod is ovalized so the handle of one Zac slides between the fork tines of another one. This allows you to store 1/3 more McLeods in the same space. This can be particularly important for trail building organizations and tool trailers where space is at a premium and lots of McLeods have to be transported. The nested McLeods are also more easily secured for transport.

  5. #5
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    someone on here made one with an interchangeable head.
    can't find it,does anyone have the link?

    where would the best place to puchase=[least$$] the Zak?
    does it really matter if the handle has the special coating or not?

    thanks in advance.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailYoda View Post
    +1 on the Zac, they have good handles and decent faceplate steel. I own Corna, Nupla, Lamberton, and Zacs.

    The Corna steel is probably higher quaility that the Zac which if you are soil with a lot of rock content might be an advantage. (The tines on the Corna's seem to get bent a lot less than the Zacs. But I'm not a big fan of the Corna or any of the bolt on designs, since we have a clay soil which when moist will stick to the face. Zac and other non-bolt on's are easier to clear the soil off the face.
    What do you think of the Nupla? I plan on ordering a few tomorrow for the price of $40bucks I thought they looked good.
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  7. #7
    Progressing the Sport
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    Hey Clock,
    Let us know how those McLeod's work on our AZ terrain.
    We may be looking for some in the future.

  8. #8
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    Me and my trail work buddies have all been using Nupla Mcleods and love them. They can take a beating and the flat face is great for tamping. Ive got 100+ hours of use out of my current one and it is still in great shape.

  9. #9
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    We have been using Nupla McLeods for a couple of years in rocky soils with similiar failure rates to other brands of McLeods.

  10. #10
    dirt visionary
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    Nice thanks for the info guys!
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
    arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by clockwork View Post
    What do you think of the Nupla? I plan on ordering a few tomorrow for the price of $40bucks I thought they looked good.
    Agree that the durability is close to the same on all of them.

    As was mentioned in an earlier post, one big advantage of the Zac is the way it nests which reduces the amount of space that it takes up by half of all the others but if you are only buying a few or have a lot of storage space that probably is not important to you. I have about 50 tools all crammed into my garage so it's helpful to me.

  12. #12
    dirt visionary
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    Yeah space is no issue as I have roughly 30 tools and out of those only one mcleod. My concern was just on durability . I have seen some mcleods that look as if they would bend if you stared at it long enough and I have seen some that weigh a ton. The nupla look like a good inbetweener that had a long lasting handle.

    Thanks again
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
    arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body.

  13. #13
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    links/pics for lazy folks
    <(*-*<) Go Ride (>*-*)>

  14. #14
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    Nupla McLeod Fire Tool
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  15. #15
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    That Nupla looks very nice!!
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

  16. #16
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    I am a bit of a traditionalist; I don't like fiberglass handles. Wood has inherent shock adsorption qualities- unlike fiberglass- is easier to replace and customize, and has a more pleasing feel. Fiberglass technologies just cannot reproduce these benefits yet; it's only advantage is its ability to be _abused_.
    I don't abuse my tools.
    The advantage of lighter weight is debatable since the heavier weight of the wood helps balance the tool head.

    Agreed that the large bolt head sticking out the middle of the face is counterproductive for our purposes.
    Last edited by KnifeKnut; 03-05-2012 at 10:39 AM. Reason: forgot weight

  17. #17
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    I also wanted a wood handle. Just bought this one from amazon as it was the only one with free shipping and the prices were otherwise comparable. Any one have personal experience with the Truper?

    Amazon.com: Truper 33033 Tru Pro Forest Service Mcleod Fire Tool, Ash Handle, 48-Inch: Patio, Lawn & Garden

  18. #18
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    Another thought I had: what length handle is best? I am only guessing from an ergonomic and geometric standpoint, but wouldn't the shorter handled ones be easier to use while bench cutting and firefighting on slopes, while the longer ones would better suited for fighting fires on flatter ground?

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    ^ your logic makes sense, knifeknut. Of course, you can always just choke up a bit on a longer handle for working on slopes. Can't make a short handle any longer though....

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by deezler View Post
    ^ your logic makes sense, knifeknut. Of course, you can always just choke up a bit on a longer handle for working on slopes. Can't make a short handle any longer though....
    Your logic makes sense too deezler, but work all day "choked up" on a handle that's too long & you'll soon see why the number of tools you need equals the number you have, plus one.
    Short handle for benching and long handle for grooming flat. Neither will work well for the other purpose for long.

    Personally, I use a long (54") handle on my Mcleod (Corona) and use my Rogue for most of my side benching.
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  21. #21
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    ^ I thought of that the other day. That is why I am leaning towards getting a short handled one and reworking it so that I can swap handles as needed, and of course break down for easier transport. 2 tools for the weight of 1 1/4!

  22. #22
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    Interesting. Most people are looking for different heads to put on one handle (axe, pick, rake, etc.), but your idea makes sense to me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja's Son
    You may be happy to hear that my dad has kicked cancer's ass. Now he's looking for whoever sent it.

  23. #23
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    Well, I have settled on a getting Rogue 70HRH, which has a nice curved 40 inch handle and a large rectangular ferrule. From what I understand, it is beefy enough to cut through roots with ease, taking over some of the tasks of the Pulaski when using that length handle; when I figure out how to make a swappable long handle for it, I will effectively have two tools.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by KnifeKnut View Post
    Well, I have settled on a getting Rogue 70HRH, which has a nice curved 40 inch handle and a large rectangular ferrule. From what I understand, it is beefy enough to cut through roots with ease, taking over some of the tasks of the Pulaski when using that length handle; when I figure out how to make a swappable long handle for it, I will effectively have two tools.
    Like the old Lays potato chip ad, one ain't enough; I have Rogue FB70H, 70HR54, and 80RH just given to try / evaluate, and see if we want more for the tool trailer.

    The 70HR54 has replaced my trusty 4 tine McLeod, I still sometimes want a standard 6 tine McLeod, but the 70HR54 now can handle about 80% of what I want to build / maintain / repair. And an occasional pulaski or pick mattock, sometimes a rock bar, sometimes a doublejack, power hedger, loppers, chainsaw, BoB, beloved R5....... Gotta have a stock of tools!
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  25. #25
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    Totally agree on the 70HR54. I have virtually every Rogue Hoe ever made and the 70HR54 is the one I end up using more than 95% of the time.

  26. #26
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    Anyone have a good source to replace a broken Corona handle?
    In the summer I build trails: www.sinuosity.net
    In the winter I build these: www.fatbikeskis.com

  27. #27
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    We have a lot of 70's and also a few 80's and the 80 is the best tool to replace Mcloeds. Far more effective in bench cutting can cut through all but the largest of roots. Has a good broad face for tamping.

  28. #28
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    i just found this one today:
    Interchangeable Mcleod hoe/rake tool head with 2-4ft Telescopic pole - Inteletool - The Tool Solution

    INTERCHANGEABLE MCLEOD HOE/RAKE TOOL HEAD WITH 2-4FT TELESCOPIC POLE

    $$$

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailYoda View Post
    We have a lot of 70's and also a few 80's and the 80 is the best tool to replace Mcloeds. Far more effective in bench cutting can cut through all but the largest of roots. Has a good broad face for tamping.
    When you say 80's, you are referring to the 80RH (Rhino)?

  30. #30
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    I go with the Rogue Hoe 70HRH with a 40" handle 95-98% of the time.

  31. #31
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    Another vote for Rogue 70HR54. We have a trailer with (4) ZACs and (2) Rogue 70HR54 and (2) Rogue 70HRH, and the Rogue Hoes (new to us) are far superior now that I've tried both. The balance, size, weight, and sharp-edges all make the Rogue better IMO. YMMV...

  32. #32
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    Found 4 coronas at a closeout store, they were marked as roofing shingle removers. $10 each!!! What a deal.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by peteuga View Post
    Found 4 coronas at a closeout store, they were marked as roofing shingle removers. $10 each!!! What a deal.
    I love when that happens. I found a bark spud at my local hardware store for $9.99. They thought it was an ice scraper. No one would buy it because it was only 3" wide.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja's Son
    You may be happy to hear that my dad has kicked cancer's ass. Now he's looking for whoever sent it.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bart.taylor.sucks View Post
    When you say 80's, you are referring to the 80RH (Rhino)?
    Yes, I am referring to the 80RH. I just bought another 6 of them. For most volunteers the 70H is a better tool since it is lighter. But if you want to get a lot of benching done and have the fitness to match the 80RH is the ticket.

  35. #35
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    New question here.

    Ok so I'm looking for a wood handle McLeod and after reading about 10 threads here and looking online have it narrowed down to 2:

    Zac
    BuyZacTools.com
    Name:  Zac.JPG
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    and

    Lamberton Rake
    12" X 9" Heavy Gauge Trail Rake Wood Handle (Weight ~ 8 lbs.)
    The Lamberton Rake
    Name:  Lamberton.jpg
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    The details: Already have a Rogue hoe for benching, root cutting and most of the swinging that doesn't require an axe or pick mattock. So the McLeod will be for raking the loose organic material out of the surface, for final finish raking and for most of the tamping.

    I like the boltless face of both of these and read lots of good things here on the Zac. Anyone used the "Heavy Gauge Trail Rake" version of the Lamberton? For my purposes I don't think the extra weight will be an issue so I am leaning towards this.

    Thanks in advance for any feedback

  36. #36
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    For raking, it's 6 of one and half a dozen of the other. Go with the widest one that you can handle. You'll get your work done faster.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja's Son
    You may be happy to hear that my dad has kicked cancer's ass. Now he's looking for whoever sent it.

  37. #37
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    My Corona McLeod has a bolt on the bottom thus it does not tamp to good, dirt sticks to the bolt area really bad. I am thinking of buying a heavier dedicated tamp.

  38. #38
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    I own one of the Lamberton heavy gauge McLeods and the head is extremely heavy. It works well if you are pulling the head along the tread like a road grader. It is too heavy to get much work done using the McLeod with a chopping motion.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markhpnc View Post
    Ok so I'm looking for a wood handle McLeod and after reading about 10 threads here and looking online have it narrowed down to 2:

    Zac


    and

    Lamberton Rake
    12" X 9" Heavy Gauge Trail Rake Wood Handle (Weight ~ 8 lbs.)



    I like the boltless face of both of these and read lots of good things here on the Zac. Anyone used the "Heavy Gauge Trail Rake" version of the Lamberton? For my purposes I don't think the extra weight will be an issue so I am leaning towards this.

    Thanks in advance for any feedback
    Mark,

    As bweide pointed out the heavy duty is really too heavy for effective building of single track tread. Get the 12"x9" size head being 6 lbs. not the 8 lbs. I got Merritt at Recycles that one since he uses it for the most part in shaping jumps and berms which makes it a good rake and tamp more for jump park construction than for building single track. If you would like to try either the Zac or the 6 lbs lamberton before you pull the trigger you can try either out of my stockpile. Mark in GSO, NC aka Singletrackmind.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrailYoda View Post
    ..........I own Corna, Nupla, Lamberton, and Zacs.
    +1 on the Lambertons. Have much better luck in tough soil with my Lamberton than with my McLeod (large one is heavier with more blade surface). They also cost less!
    PrOxY

  41. #41
    saddlemeat
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    As a retired carpenter I much prefer a wood handle for it's shock absorbing and balance characteristics. A heavy handle makes the tool less responsive and transmits more shock to your joints. I don't break tools so I prefer the lightest and best balanced. I prefer a tool that doesn't need to be swung if possible, I find I can use my legs to more advantage with a sharp zac trail shovel, especially when dealing with scrub oak roots and sage brush removal.

    Our local YCC crews use the heaviest and most durable tools they can find, and still are constantly breaking, repairing, and replacing all their tools. They tend to use Nupla becasue there is a local supplier. According to the superintendent, the most durable mcleods are the repaired ones where an extra 6" x 6" x 1/4" plate has been welded between the handle socket and the head. This eliminates a lot of flex and allows for fatter welds... but they still only last so long, two years is exceptional performance, even for tampers and digging bars.
    I ride with the best people.




  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    As a retired carpenter I much prefer a wood handle
    Im not a carpenter but I prefer the same. Sand off whatever crappy finish is on there then rub it down with boiled linseed oil

    Oh and Im about to order the Lamberton "trail" with a wood handle. Even though they only list the wood handle on the "heavy gauge", I emailed him and they can put the wood on any of them.

  43. #43
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    Collapsible Mcleod alternative.

    Due to repeatedly getting frustrated that I'd see small maintenance jobs on the tracks that I couldn't fix without the whole saga of going home, packing tools in the car, driving to closest point and walking in just to attend to a few 5 minute tidy up jobs, I've started making collapsible rakehoe type tools.

    These aren't a replacement for regular full size fixed Mcleods etc, but are intended to be carried in a small pack (it fits in the Camelback Mule and other 10Litre'ish size packs) while riding. It can tackle many typical maintenance tasks but certainly isn't intended to be used for hours on end, or for serious trail construction.

    I've had a bit of interest in them, so I've started a simple web page.
    home.exetel.com.au/peterbmack/packhoe.php

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikerPeteOz View Post
    Due to repeatedly getting frustrated that I'd see small maintenance jobs on the tracks that I couldn't fix without the whole saga of going home, packing tools in the car, driving to closest point and walking in just to attend to a few 5 minute tidy up jobs, I've started making collapsible rakehoe type tools.
    I have started using the Rogue Hoe and find it works great for the above mentioned problem. It is lighter and smaller than a McLeod and digs similar to the Polaski.

  45. #45
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    I use a gravel rake from Lowes. Works pretty well for roughing in a trail in the woods behind my place. Nobody else is riding my trail, so it ain't worth spending $80+ bucks on a mcleod and bench cutting. North Carolina jungle.
    There, I said it.

  46. #46
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    Are there any other options to the intellitool for take-down portable McLeods?

  47. #47
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    My answer would be my Packhoe, but have you got a link to the Intellitool, I haven't seen that.
    Quote Originally Posted by beechnut View Post
    Are there any other options to the intellitool for take-down portable McLeods?

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikerPeteOz View Post
    My answer would be my Packhoe, but have you got a link to the Intellitool, I haven't seen that.
    The intellitool was listed up above in the thread.
    Firefighting Tools - Inteletool - The Tool Solution

  49. #49
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    Ahh. Quite right. For some reason I was thinking that had a different name.

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