Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    19

    Alternative to wheelbarrow

    We are to the point of putting in signs on the local county recreation area singletrack. Need a way to carry 15-20 six foot carsonite signposts and the driver and starter. Is there a long, low, narrow trailer that could be pulled by one guy on singletrack without too much trouble? What do you use, and did you have to build your own?

  2. #2
    saddlemeat
    Reputation: bsieb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,572
    My experience with this is that there can be a lot of stress on the bike frame. I used a BOB with a custom rack. Frame cracked at the rear dropouts. This was with the heavy driver and a dozen carsonite posts. YMMV.
    Making the smack track baby.


  3. #3
    I build my own.
    Reputation: Trail Ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    5,285
    I've used a rescue litter similar to this. It's a walk-in wagon as opposed to ride-in but it will handle any terrain and a lot of weight.
    Mule Litter Wheel with Handles
    There are many incarnations of this design, do a little searching. No need to pay $1500 for one. Not that hard to build from a bike wheel.

    I found a lighter version for half the price.
    Advance Series Trail Technician
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    19
    Thanks for the suggestions. We'll probably build something along the lines of the litter that one person can handle. Or use a pack animal.

  5. #5
    Masher
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    534
    2 wheeled canoe cart, a couple of nylon straps, and multiple trips!

  6. #6
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4,664
    Sometimes there's no substitute for manpower hiking stuff in with back packs/pack boards. Bike trailers are great for many situations, but they definitely have limitations.

  7. #7
    I build my own.
    Reputation: Trail Ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    5,285
    There are plenty of options if 2 wheels will make it. This is one of my favourites. strap a plastic garbage can to it and it can be used to carry almost anything. I've never tried to attach one to a bike but if you're inventive...
    Around $50.

    Name:  images.jpg
Views: 1261
Size:  6.3 KB
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    19
    The handtruck is a great idea. I have one just like that with Stan's in the tires. I wasn't looking for something to pull with a bike, just something narrow enough to pull on singletrack to get more done with fewer trips..

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    243
    Check out folding game carts. They're usually rated for 300 lbs and the larger wheels are a lot easier to pull along a trail. I'm not sure if they're 29" or 650b...

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    914
    Just get a honda wheel barrow. Should make it easy.

  11. #11
    backwoods and backwards
    Reputation: MOJO K's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,244
    I think the game-cart idea is the winner.
    MERCY! MERCY! MERCY!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ray.vermette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    305
    Anyone have any experience using game carts to move heavy rocks (ie 100-300lbs)? Will they hold up to the abuse? The larger wheels and foldability would be a plus for me, but I wonder if I can find one durable enough to last.

    I've used moving dollys like the one Trail Ninja posted above, rated to 500lbs, and I've busted them.

    Tree dollys are stury enough, but not easily as portable.

  13. #13
    FloridaKeys Fishing Guide
    Reputation: OscarW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,822

    ... and if we just ...

    We have been using this gem for 4 months now and it is a great machine as we no longer have to use buckets to haul fill to 90 % of the trails. The dumper is 4WD and climbs like a mountain goat. Of course it isn't the end all to everything and you can't haul 800 pounds on a super steep slope but 1/2 a load still beats 20/30 buckets and wearing out the volunteers prematurely...

    MAX DUMPERô Motorized Wheelbarrow - Dumper
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    68
    We (FWMBA) just purchased a Gorilla Cart from Northern Tool.
    4 wheels
    1200lb capacity
    dumpable
    handle big enough for two people to pull it
    handle spins around for hitch to 4wheeler/tractor
    ~$170

    We haven't used it yet, but our first workday is this Saturday. We'll be hauling ~30 bags of quickcrete through the bush, so I'll report back on it's ease of use.

  15. #15
    I build my own.
    Reputation: Trail Ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    5,285
    Quote Originally Posted by beechnut View Post
    We (FWMBA) just purchased a Gorilla Cart from Northern Tool.
    4 wheels
    1200lb capacity
    dumpable
    handle big enough for two people to pull it
    handle spins around for hitch to 4wheeler/tractor
    ~$170

    We haven't used it yet, but our first workday is this Saturday. We'll be hauling ~30 bags of quickcrete through the bush, so I'll report back on it's ease of use.
    Is this it? I've been toying with the idea of getting one. It would never do for the trails in BC but now that I'm in Ontario, I could see where I could use one. I'd be interested in hearing how it worked.

    Gorilla Carts 1,200-lb. Poly Dump Cart GOR865D11-1 at The Home Depot
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja View Post
    Is this it? I've been toying with the idea of getting one. It would never do for the trails in BC but now that I'm in Ontario, I could see where I could use one. I'd be interested in hearing how it worked.

    Yeah that's it. Looks like HD as a better price.

    It's narrow enough for all our trails, but might be too sketchy for the rocky bits, or steep areas. If it's a 50% solution, I think it's a score.

  17. #17
    I build my own.
    Reputation: Trail Ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    5,285
    Fairly new product from Home Hardware. I'm not sure if it's available in the States. They never have them in stock but it looks promising. It's a rock sling/wheelbarrow/hand truck all in one. It's kind of lightweight but 300lbs will get you a long way in general trailbuilding. Watch the video.

    Home Hardware - Multi-Use Wheelbarrow/Handtruck
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  18. #18
    FloridaKeys Fishing Guide
    Reputation: OscarW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,822
    I hate to be negative on wheelbarrows but judging by the wrecked ones we have laying around, you'd better have someone who knows how to handle one.

    We ended up doing a huge fundraiser and got the Muck-truck for all our (hill) work. Even that beast can't be loaded to the max on uneven terrain unless you want to lose the load, but at least we get work done and don't wear out the build team as fast. It is amazing that equipment of the right type increases the amount of people volunteering to help out.
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

  19. #19
    humber river advocate
    Reputation: singlesprocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    6,150
    Quote Originally Posted by chinacap View Post
    We are to the point of putting in signs on the local county recreation area singletrack. Need a way to carry 15-20 six foot carsonite signposts and the driver and starter. Is there a long, low, narrow trailer that could be pulled by one guy on singletrack without too much trouble? What do you use, and did you have to build your own?
    i did to haul in bridge spans ... easy to build using old bike fork and wheel.

    here's one with a span...

    Support TORBA
    Sunnyside Bike Park Working Group
    Albion Hills Conservation Area Master Plan Public Advisory Committee

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    243
    Awesome prototype 10 passenger DH unicycle!

    Since it's obviously top heavy, what did you do to stabilize it? (The last time I built a bridge span I carried it up in pieces- by hand, backpack & BOB trailer. It sucked! I like your way better.)

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    68
    Here's the report from the maiden Gorrila Cart use:

    It easily handled 6-7 80lb bags of quickcrete at a time. The dump action worked ok, but you're certainly limited to however much you want to lift during the dump. The deep wagon also proved useful for carting tools on and off the trail.





  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    22
    I'm surprised that there wasn't enough local rock or downe trees to make that little kicker. Kinda looks like wasted concrete. I think a more natural choice would have sufficed. "Leave no trail"?

  23. #23
    I build my own.
    Reputation: Trail Ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    5,285
    Quote Originally Posted by singlesprocket View Post
    i did to haul in bridge spans ... easy to build using old bike fork and wheel.

    here's one with a span...

    Thanks for posting that, singlesprocket. I knew I'd seen that before but I couldn't remember who had it
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    19
    Great idea, Singlesproket! We have donated gluelams to pack in for bridge spars as well.

  25. #25
    humber river advocate
    Reputation: singlesprocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    6,150
    Quote Originally Posted by warmonkey View Post
    Awesome prototype 10 passenger DH unicycle!

    Since it's obviously top heavy, what did you do to stabilize it? (The last time I built a bridge span I carried it up in pieces- by hand, backpack & BOB trailer. It sucked! I like your way better.)
    the bridge spans are standard length. the pic includes one span already bolted on. i use a ratchet straps for the rest (3 or 4). it's important to balance the load. i nail extra control 2x4s onto the front and back (use the wood in the build). with two people it's easy and fast. on one trail i've used it as a wheel barrow and moved all the spans myself. it left people scratching their heads how the build went so fast.
    Support TORBA
    Sunnyside Bike Park Working Group
    Albion Hills Conservation Area Master Plan Public Advisory Committee

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •