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Thread: 40 acre track

  1. #1
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    40 acre track

    Ive got 40-50acres of mostly wooded land I would like T build a course on,about 1/4mile square and has some rolling hills,just looking for some ideas and if this is a big enough area?

  2. #2
    I need skills
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    yes

    yes

  3. #3
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    milk it

  4. #4
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    The 40 Acre Track, that's where Winnie the Pooh rides, right?

  5. #5
    featherweight clydesdale
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    Quote Originally Posted by quinton View Post
    Ive got 40-50acres of mostly wooded land I would like T build a course on,about 1/4mile square and has some rolling hills,just looking for some ideas and if this is a big enough area?
    Think of trail "density" in terms of numbers of acres you need per mile. It's possible on many tracts with rolling and wooded topo to get about 1 mile per 10 acres and still get that feeling that you're going somewhere instead of being on a gerbil wheel. It's certainly not a backcountry experience, but what I mean here is that one trail leg is hidden from the next, you might see a rider on it, but the trail isn't so close that you'd be encouraging short cuts by hikers. You might be "herding wildlife" at density this tight. I have section of 18 acres like this w/ 1.8 miles, I move the deer here, I move the deer there, as I ride.

    It's possible to do 1 mile per 5 or 6 acres but you're getting into a situation where you'd be high-fiving your riding buds on the opposite trail leg or creating a spider web of trails.

    If it were me, I'd shoot for 4 to 5 miles. Print out a large topo map of the property with a distance scale, laminate, design, redesign, hike, scout, take your time. Build something you're proud to show off to people. You can use a piece of string measured out along the scale to estimate the distance of your trail before you start cutting stuff in. 70% of getting it right is done in the design and layout before you start actually cutting the trail in.
    Charlottesville Area Mountain Bike Club
    www.cambc.org

  6. #6
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    Thanks willy,thats the kind of info im looking for,very helpful.Im wanting to start after the first of the year because its 50 min to my closest riding area.I have owned this land for years and just hunt on it,it will be nice to get some more use out of it.

  7. #7
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    Exactly what Willy said. Take your time laying it out. Fall and Winter are the best times to do that since the leaves will be off. I'd guess depending on the topography that you will yield 3-5 miles of trail. I remember the first few miles of trail I designed from scratch. Took me 3 months to lay out 2 miles of trail! But it's still there, sustainable and pretty awesome if I do say myself.

    What he said about pride in your work, too.

    Best of luck and have fun!

  8. #8
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    I have a 40 acre tract that I have built a trail system on. Wooded and hilly. The estimate of 1 mile per 10 acres is a good one. But there are ways to have a longer and more diverse ride without looking at 3 other lines. It depends on terrain and vegetaion thickness. I have about 5 miles on the property, but, I can ride for hours at a time easily without too much repeating. A normal is 6 - 10 miles.

    What I do is use parrallel lines with cross over trails and follow the terrain. Setting up loops with a "Hub". With multiple "hubs" it gives you the abillity to weave around the property and back without repeating. I try to use the terrain for maximal fun factor. Climb and dive to reuse the same relief. Trying to make the longest DH runs possible. Grade reversals take back altitude to keep a run going.

    Good luck

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