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  1. #1
    viva la v-brakes!
    Reputation: FishMan473's Avatar
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    work bench construction?

    My wife and I are FINALLY moving into a house after five years in four different apartments. So I am ready to settled down into a permanent bike workshop. The good news is that I have like half of the basement to work with. The bad news is that I don't know where to start. I think I would like a bench that's about 10 feet long and 2 feet deep. I am not sure if I want to put in storage below, or if I want to leave it open underneath so I can slide my stool in and sit down. And what about building materials and construction? Right now I have a work bench made of lumber, but I'm no carpenter so it is quite rickety, and too small and not as well thought out as it should be.

    This thread has given me some ideas but I'd like more nuts and bolts info.

    Also, what re people's favorite bike storage methods? Right now we have a bike tree which I hate, might work OK if there were only two bike and it was placed up against a wall but with 4 bikes in the middle of the room its a disaster. I have been happy in the past hanging bikes from hooks on the wall, but the concrete walls of the basement I think will only allow for hooks to hang on the above floor beams which might not be the right width apart for bikes. Any thoughts?
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    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  2. #2
    conjoinicorned
    Reputation: ferday's Avatar
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    there are many ways to get a hook into the concrete walls, i recommend renting/borrowing a drill and a couple of threaded inserts, then using the threaded hook of your choice. you can also hilti gun a couple 2x4 pieces into the wall and screw a normal hook into those.

    as far as the workbench, i made mine 36" deep, then recessed the bottom shelf (24" deep) so i could pull a stool in. i made mine out of wood with the intention of sheeting the top with steel, but haven't got there yet...

    have fun!
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    My current workbench is made from 5/8" plywood for the top and a 2x4 framework. If I were to do it again, I'd stick with the same construction. The difference is that I'd take a 4'x8' sheet of the plywood and have Lowes/HD rip it to 30" and 18" wide by full length. The smaller piece would then be a lower shelf. I recently put up a 4'x8' pegboard behind my workbench. What a difference!

  4. #4
    viva la v-brakes!
    Reputation: FishMan473's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice on the concrete drilling. I guess I'll look into that and head to the hardware store. I'll probably go with your latter suggestion since I have about a dozen bike hooks I could use.

    Does anyone have plans or other detailed info? Good photos of really good set ups?
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  5. #5
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    I've seen a lot of bike shops bolt a 2x4 to the overhead rafters (floor joists in your case), and then screw in bike hooks spaced as needed. It looks like it works pretty slick, and no need to fasten to the concrete wall. Just a thought...

  6. #6
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    here are enough ideas to make your head spin: free work bench plans

  7. #7
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    I made mine with $60 worth of lumber. 1 12 ft long, 4x4 cedar post (Chopped into 4 equal sections), 1 sheet of 3/8 in. CDX plywood (Ripped in half at the yard) about 30 foot of 2x4 and a sheet of peg board. I cant lag into the wall to affix permanent like, but its pretty stable as is. I have a huge tool box, and between that and the peg board, I have no need for drawers...yet. I am dangerous with a circular saw, so anything is possible!
    It is 34 inches high, 2 ft deep and 5 feet long.
    Also, whenever possible use screws instead of nails. Stability is a plus! (Sorry about the bad picture!)
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  8. #8
    Prez NMBA
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    for going into concrete walls or block, get a hammer drill, this is key, as a regular drill will take all day even with a masonary bit and use TapCons
    http://www.buildextapcon.com/ available at any home store. I know they dont look like much but they work AWSOME. also make sure and use a driver with a hex head driver to put the tapcons in with after you drill the hole

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