Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 66
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rickcin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    881

    Value of owning a work stand?

    I am a weekend tinkerer and between the wife and I, we own 4 bikes.

    I was thinking of buying a work stand to hold the bikes when washing them, cleaning and lubricating the chain, etc.. I am not proficient enough to adjust the derailleur but would like to have a work stand for stuff I can do and or learn to do.

    Is the work stand a waste based on my intended use?

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,480
    I don't know. Can you afford it? What are you doing now?

    I've never owned a work stand. For the last five years, I've always kept some bikes on a rack that leans against the wall. I can adjust the height of the hooks on the rack. I use work stands on occasion, when I'm using a professional shop space usually. They're nice. It's nice that the bike doesn't move around.

    Anyway, for me, a work stand isn't enough better than my rack for me to go out and spend money on one.

    If you haven't already bumped into the Park Tool web site, I highly recommend it. IMHO, all mountain bikers should understand their drivetrains and the bike's systems well enough to fix things and get out of the woods should something fail off-road. (Which never happens, of course. )
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gmats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    2,154
    No, the work stand is an amazing tool which is incredibly handy. You will find other uses for the stand as your experience grows. If you can afford one, get it. If you can't afford one, there are many threads in the tooltime section on building them. While sometimes not so elegant, they are still useful and often work great.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rickcin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    881
    Yes, I can afford one and think it would be good when washing the bikes or cleaning the chain and cassette. I would just drag the stand onto a level spot in the yard to was the bikes and lube the chains. Biggest advantage is to have the rear wheel off the ground when lubricating the chain.

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,480
    OK, so get it. At worst, you lose some money that you can afford to lose, and you might find you have a better work process with its help.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mountain Cycle Shawn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,747
    I use an old trainer for a work stand that someone gave me a long time ago. It's the kind that you take the front wheel off to put it in. And it allows me to spin the rear wheel. I like it because the bike doesn't wiggle all over the place when you work on it like an ordinary stand.
    '96 San Andreas
    '12 Santa Cruz Nickel LT
    '08 KTM 530
    '12 Toyota FJ TT
    '05 MiniCooper S
    '95 Honda HB Si
    '71 Dino 246 GT

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sasquatch rides a SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,708
    If you've looked around on threads about repair stands on mtbr, you'll find a lot of the same thing; people saying how working on your bike turns into something fun with a repair stand. I don't think I'll ever go back to not using a stand. Once you find that you're able to do more with the bike secure and elevated, you'll want to learn how to do more. While you'll likely be spending more money on additional tools, you'll be saving money by not paying a shop to do your tune ups, cable changes, whatever it is you're doing. I say if you've got the money, do it. A portable/foldable repair stand is great...it's surprisingly nice to work outside in the sun some days
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride have no legs...
    Road riders who don't mountain bike have no soul...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4,123
    I had one for a while. I dont now. I dont really miss it or anything.

    It was nice to work on, but I have 2 bikes that get tuned up twice a season. It just didnt see that much use. I do everything from wheel building to full suspension rebuilds. My wheelbuilding stand however, I couldnt live without!

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: btrutta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16
    Definitely worth it, it will also allow you to learn how to do a lot more maintenance on your bikes as well.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    99
    I recently got back into mountain biking last year in September. Soon after I bought a stand, Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance book and a inexpensive set of bike tools. Best money I have spent in a long time. I have since learned how to put a bike together and adjust everything I need to. It is a hobby in itself and I have saved a ton of money doing my own repairs and bike builds. The bad thing is that I keep tinkering and upgrading parts and bikes. I still support the LBS and they are helpful with advice when needed.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: One Pivot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4,123
    Quote Originally Posted by btrutta View Post
    Definitely worth it, it will also allow you to learn how to do a lot more maintenance on your bikes as well.
    Theres nothing you can do on a stand that you cant do otherwise. It makes working more ergonomic, but thats it. Dont buy one expecting to expand your skills!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rickcin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    881
    Yeah, many people have posted great info on a simple subject and I think the bottom line is the work stand is a big convenience. One could do without it but it does make things easier so I think my drivetrain would benefit from having one.

    Pretty funny reply reply from Andrw..., you will be losing money you can afford to lose!
    Unfortunately, I do have toys/tools that I do not use that often, but when I do, I love the fact that I have them.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: btrutta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16
    No, won't expand your skills. It will make learning much easier though. PITA swapping cranks, adjusting deraileurs and brakes, swapping chains, swapping tires, rebuilding forks...it makes doing a lot of maintenance a heluva lot easier having the ability to hold the bike in a fixed position. but ymmv.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rickcin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    881
    No bad thing about tinkering and spending money on parts, it is a healthy sport/hobby. Better than spending the afternoon in a bar or wasting in another way!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,054
    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    I am not proficient enough to adjust the derailleur but would like to have a work stand for stuff I can do and or learn to do.
    Rickcin,
    You absolutely can learn how to do these things, and once you understand how they work, it is super simple to adjust!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rickcin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    881
    Quote Originally Posted by nov0798 View Post
    Rickcin,
    You absolutely can learn how to do these things, and once you understand how they work, it is super simple to adjust!
    You know what, I like your attitude, just about everything boils down to attitude and desire, not intelligence. I hope to learn, thanks for your input.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: husonfirst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    78
    It makes working on your bike easier. Being a tinkerer, you will probably start to do more maintenance work yourself rather than taking it to the shop. You don't need one but I believe in using the right tool for the job.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    51
    I debated buying a workstand, but ultimately I screwed a couple eye screws into the ceiling and I hang my bikes using motorcycle Ancra tiedowns. It allows me to raise/lower the bike easily depending on what part of the bike I'm working on. I can also hang it by one area to get it at a severe angle. Much simpler/cheaper than a workstand.

    Value of owning  a work stand?-gianttransformation-011.jpg

    AM.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rickcin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    881
    Very clever and I assume it works well but the bike will swing back and forth when working on it.

  20. #20
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,480
    The rack I use shares that disadvantage.

    My feeling is that having the bike at a good height gets me most of the way "there" on what I get from a real work stand. I'm nervous reefing on anything on my bike and trusting a work stand to hold it steady. So I'd have a hand on the bike in that circumstance anyway.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    51
    I haven't had much of an issue with it swinging. As the poster before me said, when using any significant leverage, I tend to hold the bike to keep it from moving. A stand would certainly be better, but I always seem to have something better to spend $150 on!

    AM.

  22. #22
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,331
    I have a Feedback Sports stand that I love. Setting up a drivetrain becomes easy when you're not wrestling the bike around on the floor.

    Check Ebay. I have the Pro, which I've seen on there for 149. They make a sport model that has a simpler clamp system that's even less expensive.
    I like turtles

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,239
    Buy it. Sounds like you want to already. It's convenient to have a stand, and it sounds like you will definitely be using it, for whatever reason or another.

    I use one that folds up (if needed, though mine is always out) so transporting/moving it around is easy.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rickcin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    881
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    The rack I use shares that disadvantage.

    My feeling is that having the bike at a good height gets me most of the way "there" on what I get from a real work stand. I'm nervous reefing on anything on my bike and trusting a work stand to hold it steady. So I'd have a hand on the bike in that circumstance anyway.
    Thinking of getting the Feedback Sports Pro Elite stand and just want to get the bike in the air to sit on a stool to service, clean & lube the drivetrain and crank.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sasquatch rides a SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,708
    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Thinking of getting the Feedback Sports Pro Elite stand and just want to get the bike in the air to sit on a stool to service, clean & lube the drivetrain and crank.
    Good choice. I don't think you'll ever go back to working on a bike without one
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride have no legs...
    Road riders who don't mountain bike have no soul...

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. work stand
    By smokey0066 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-15-2012, 02:18 PM
  2. Best Non Portable Work Stand?
    By jimarin in forum Tooltime
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-05-2011, 12:15 PM
  3. which work stand
    By buckshotsktm in forum Tooltime
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-11-2011, 05:32 PM
  4. $20 Work Stand
    By bing! in forum Tooltime
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-18-2011, 01:41 PM
  5. My $40 work stand...
    By Dad Man Walking in forum Tooltime
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-12-2011, 05:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •