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  1. #1
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    Too many chain tool opinions; what abouit NO Tool?

    I have a Pedros Six Pack, a Topeak Hexus II, KMC Missing Links and a Park CT-3 in my Amazon Wish List for several weeks now. I've seen the Youtube videos, read the archives here and reviews elsewhere and can't reach a decision except I know I need to make one.

    Multi-tool (I have a Park 3-Way Hex, Tire irons and a Leatherman Multi in my pack) or Chain Breaker?

    Or should I simply take my bike to the LBS, have them install a master link in my Shimano HG-53 chain and buy a few spares?

    Will the Master Link always break before a regular one?
    IT'S CRACKERS TO SLIP A ROZZER THE DROPSY IN SNIDE

  2. #2
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    I used a park ct-5 (it came in a park kit back in the mid-late 90's) a lot over the years. It still resides in my camelbak. I used a couple of Rivoli's over the years, and they don't last, but are fine for road/trailside use.
    A year or so ago I got the CT-3, for home use, the ct-5 was my go to chain tool before that, but the ct-3 is not what I'd want to carry on the bike.

    I have SRAM or KMC master links on all my 8, 9 & 10spd chains, never had an issue. I keep a couple of extra master links in each of my bike's tool kits & a chain tool (in a small kit or on a multi-tool), just in case. They usually end up being used on a friend's bike, since I haven't messed up/broke a chain in a long time.
    [SIZE=1][/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Anchorage, AK
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    8k miles of commuting so far and no broken master link.

    --Lars
    --Peace

  4. #4
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    I have an older Topeak Alien that looks identical to the Hexus tool. It has never let me down. I like the way the tire levers store on the sides, and they are pretty strong. I won't ride without a chain tool. Good thing, because I have had the misfortune of breaking 4 chains this year! One on my road bike, and three on my mountain. The chains were pretty used and abused, so it was definitely time.

    I also use the KMC Missing Link. I've had 2 on one chain with no problems, and have never had one fail. Also, they are way cheaper than the Sram PowerLink. I bought a card of 6 for about $10 on Amazon. For that price, it is worth having that little extra piece of mind stashed in your bag.

  5. #5
    Give it a crank
    Reputation: Mtn-Rider's Avatar
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    Master link, no buts about it. It results in less chain-related problems and you can easily remove the chain anytime. Carrying a few spare master links can also save somebody's ride out on the trail.

  6. #6
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    Modern multispeed chain always need to be joined by a master link or a special pin. You can't just push out a pin and push it back in like on old chains. The chain tool is there simply to break the chain, and to install the special joining pin if you're using that system.

  7. #7
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    Master links are great and as bad mechanic said modern chains are designed to be joined by a special link or pin, but if you are on a ride and need repair many times a chain tool is the only salvation.

    Pretty much any one will do but you'll be glad it's in your bag if you need it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Master links are great and as bad mechanic said modern chains are designed to be joined by a special link or pin, but if you are on a ride and need repair many times a chain tool is the only salvation.
    That's why I carry a master link and a chain tool. Use the chain tool to break it, and the master link to join it.

  9. #9
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    You do need to carry a chain tool to remove the bent/broken link from the end of the snapped chain, and a spare master link to replace it. Any chain tool on a multi-tool should be capable of pushing the pin out of a broken link, which will leave you with two ends that can be re-joined with a master link. A master link alone won't get you going if you can't remove that bent-out link at the end.
    Justin
    Salt Lake City
    2012 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29
    2006 Specialized Allez Expert Double

  10. #10
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    A master link alone won't get you going if you can't remove that bent-out link at the end.
    -but a chain tool will. If you forget or lose your master link you can join a broken chain using only the tool. I know you're not supposed to but I have ridden chains to the end of their useful lives joined this way with no problems.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Master links are great and as bad mechanic said modern chains are designed to be joined by a special link or pin, but if you are on a ride and need repair many times a chain tool is the only salvation.

    Pretty much any one will do but you'll be glad it's in your bag if you need it.
    Thanks to all. I ordered a CT-5 chain tool, pack of KMC master links and Zinn-recommended Progold.

    I'll practice chain-breaking at home so I can give the chain a much needed bath then treat with the Progold. Hopefully, when the time comes, I'll remember on the trail what I did at home.
    IT'S CRACKERS TO SLIP A ROZZER THE DROPSY IN SNIDE

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