Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldschoolReloaded's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    353

    New question here. Suspension Fork install.... what tools do I need?

    Hi guys...
    I have a new frame and want to install my new suspension fork. I know I need a headset and bearings, but what tools do I need? Or should I say, what would be the minimum tools I would need. I figure I need a bearing cup press, and head wrench, but what else?

    I would like to do this as cheaply as I can, and would prefer not to spend a fortune. I know I could take it into a bike shop but I want to do it myself. I am sure many of you have figured out ways to do things without expensive tools, so let me know what you use. I assume that tool rental companies do not rent out bicycle tools.

    I am clueless and tool-less...

    OSRL

  2. #2
    because GIANT
    Reputation: 127.0.0.1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    2,562
    you need the proper cutting tools for the steerer

    typically carbon or aluminum

    has to be done right, or you will b running a risky setup.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,601
    Idf there is a bike COOP in your area that lets you pay to work on your bike then that could solve your budget issue.

    There are so many threads on MTBR on pressing headsets with DIY tool, just do a search for them. However, I'd spend the money on a proper press.

    You will need to set the crown race on the fork, search for that process on MTBR, too. I use a proper crown race setting tool but place a section of PVC on top and hammer it with a rubber mallet. When you do this, do NOT place the fork dropouts on something hard like the floor or a block as it risks damaging the fork legs when you hammer. I set mine with the fork resting on a thick air mattress last time I did it. You can avoid all this and go cheapo if you buy a split-ring crown race that works with your headset. With split-ring you just place it on the fork crown with your hand--no hammering.

    You need a proper pipe-cutter tool to cut the fork's steerer tube to proper length, you also need a deburring tool or ewhatever it is called to address mushrooming. If you skip the latter you will never be able to set the star-nut.

    So next thing you need is. A starnut settting tool. Search MTBR for this process too.

    If you want to DIY, you either beg, borrow or buy the tools, or do it with hack-tools.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rngspnr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    421
    2' PVC pipe for crown race, Hacksaw, Hose clamp, scribe, file. For steerer tube.
    Piece of all thread with nuts and fender washers large enough for headset cups.
    Socket for star nut.
    This is how I have installed and cut all of my forks.
    OK obviously the all thread and washers are for the headset cups. You set the cups in place run the all thread through head tube slide fender washers 3 each side to be stiff enough then the nuts. Keeping the all thread centered as best possible tighten the nuts until cups are seated in head tube. Remember to grease cups and head tube before installing.
    Next slide crown race onto steerer tube. Using the PVC pipe turn fork upside-down and holding the stanchions hit pipe on floor until crown race is seated all the way down onto fork. Place lower bearing on fork and slide fork into head tube, assemble headset with stem and the amount of spacers you need. Mark steerer tube at top of stem and then disassemble everything. Using the mark for top of stem measure 3mm below this and mark on steerer tube again. This is where you will be cutting the fork. Take the hose clamp and tighten around steerer tube at your cut mark and cut alongside hose clamp with hacksaw this will give you a straight cut. Once cut, use file to smooth cut and remove any rough burrs. Next using a socket larger than the threaded nut on star nut but not as large as the tangs drive star nut into steerer tube about 10-15mm making sure it goes in straight. Once this is done assemble fork with headset, stem and spacers. Remember to grease everything as you assemble to prevent creaking.

  5. #5
    Class Clown
    Reputation: dundundata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,078
    You can pound headset cups in with a piece of wood and mallet. Crown race is trickier. Starnut can be down without special tools as well but you have to be careful it goes in straight.

    I use a pipe cutter for the steerer.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldschoolReloaded's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    353
    Thanks guys...
    What about a cheap (but functional) work stand...any suggestions on that?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rngspnr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    421
    This right here. Have had mine for 13 years does the job.
    https://www.feedbacksports.com/shop/...al-work-stand/

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeBurnsie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    323
    I used a 1 1/2" pvc pipe to set the crown race. get a piece long enough so you can invert the fork and wack the pvc off the floor, you won't and can't damage your fork that way. Home depot sells 24" pieces. I did have to chamfer a little for a better interface. Here's a link to a video on how to make a star nut setter. It worked like a charm. https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q...B0CD&FORM=VIRE
    I had the bike shop press in the headset cups.
    2016 Transition Patrol
    2011 Stump Jumper
    2005 Iron Horse Warrior

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RS VR6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,933
    Quote Originally Posted by OldschoolReloaded View Post
    Thanks guys...
    What about a cheap (but functional) work stand...any suggestions on that?
    I have one of these. Been using mine for about four years now.

    Pro Bike 41"To 75"Repair Stand Adjustable W/Telescopic Arm Bicycle Cycle Rack | eBay

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldschoolReloaded's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    353
    So which gives a cleaner cut...the hacksaw with a guide, or the tubing cutter? Overall the tubing cutter would be cheaper, unless I need some special type of tubing cutter.

  11. #11
    Class Clown
    Reputation: dundundata's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,078
    i've always used a regular tube cutter. i think it's easier and makes a nice cut

Similar Threads

  1. Tools needed to install dropper on Trance??
    By norcalbiker111 in forum Giant
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-12-2015, 06:46 AM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-07-2014, 03:05 PM
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-19-2013, 11:18 PM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-16-2013, 08:34 AM
  5. Tools to install BB?
    By Super Bajones in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-13-2012, 07:10 PM

Members who have read this thread: 46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •