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  1. #1
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    Setting Up Shop in Spare Garage Bay

    Hey Guys,

    A buddy of mine and I have decided to dedicate half of the extra garage bay at his house to the bikes... All we have now is an L shaped area with two tables, a bookshelf, and a plastic shelving rack. I know we will need a bike stand (recommendations?) but I'm not sure what else to invest in.

    Anyone have a master shop list or anything that I can work to complete?


    Thanks,

    Mike

  2. #2
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    the park website has a tool list. i like ultimate/feedback sports stands

  3. #3
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    I'm in the same process as you are but doing it in my basement. So far I am finding you can't have enough work bench space.

    I agree with reptilezs check out parks website they have recommended tool lists. I have also done some searches here as well but I don't have any list put together yet. I'm buying tools as I need them.

    I also have the Feedback Pro Elite work stand that I really like.
    http://www.rei.com/product/729321

  4. #4
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    Find ourself a wall and put up a pegboard. It's the best way to store your tools, easy access and organized storage. Everyone says to buy the tools as you need them, which I agree 100%, but there are a few tool and supplies you will always need if you don't already have them:

    Pegboard w/hooks
    Workstand
    Allen wrenches
    shop rags - buy a huge bundle at Walmart for $10
    Cleaner
    Chain lube
    Floor pump
    trash can
    decent lighting - I have florescent lights but also a workshop light on a stand
    jam box
    binder - you know all the instructions that come with parts? put them in the binder

  5. #5
    Rider and Wrench
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    Bloodyknee gave some great advice with the pegboard (and other items)- I have a full roll away box for my auto tools but I find that I like the pegboard for my bike stuff- Also a stand with adjustable height is the best way to go-

    I am not sure how in depth you plan on going but here are some other items that are pretty helpful... Of course the extreamly specific stuff is bought as needed but most of the below stuff is fairly ordinary and used for maint etc... alot of it is not even bike specific so you may just need to poach it from another tool box...

    Adjustable wrench
    torque wrench
    torx & allen sockets (to use with the torque wrench)
    Razor knife
    cable cutters
    #1 & #2 phillips head Screw drivers
    Small, med, large flat head screw drivers
    chain whip (park makes a combo w/pedal wrench)
    Pedal wrench (see above though many pedals now use allens...)
    old tooth brushes
    old tupper wear or metal cleaning bowl
    rubbing alcohol (great for cleaning brake rotors)
    emory cloth
    brass punch
    rubber/plastic mallet
    bottle opener (well you know...)
    small dikes
    Zip ties
    set of xtra shifer cables/ends/housing/end crimps
    chain tool & pins
    cassette removal tool (works on centerlock rotors as well)
    Bottom Bracket tool (external ... internal?? whatcha got)
    Tube of grease
    thread lock
    tire levers
    Shock Pump
    Hack saw
    bike repair manual (park's is decent...)

    I am sure I have missed some other basics and put some items that you may not yet find necessary but...

    Have a blast
    I Just wish I could ride more!


  6. #6
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    Wow thanks for the advice guys!

    I'm going to build a second shop in my basement if I really stick with my new hobby

    I need to get some of that nice flooring to put down - like in gyms - and also some table clothes for the crappy foldup tables I'm using...

    And tools!


    -Mike

  7. #7
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    Good luck with it and send some pics when you get it set up. Everybody likes pics of the workshop on this forum. Seems to really get their pants going crazy......

  8. #8
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    I would like some good ideas for a stand. I dont want anything portable. Just want it to be cheap and sturdy. I'm all about fabricating if needed.

  9. #9
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    Has anyone ever used a seat post rigidly mounted as a bike stand?
    I have a way to mount a seat post to a beam in my shop. I figure clamping a bike to a seatpost is not much different than clamping the existing seatpost.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tm240z
    Has anyone ever used a seat post rigidly mounted as a bike stand?
    I have a way to mount a seat post to a beam in my shop. I figure clamping a bike to a seatpost is not much different than clamping the existing seatpost.
    Cool idea, but the main issue you will run into is not all bikes use the same size seatpost. Plus with this method you wouldn't be able to rotate the bike to different angles which you may need for various repairs/maintenance. It also may be more of a pain to hold the bike up while you tighten the seatpost clamp...regular shop stand is really fast/easy to use.
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  11. #11
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    I think i have a way to mount the seatpost/arm so that it will be able to rotate. I can remove the post to install it in the bike, and then slide the arm that holds the post into the bracket that holds everything up. Both my bikes are 27.2 so thats not an issue.
    I'll take some pics when i figure it out.
    It's the scot in me! I can spend a stupid amount of man hours saving a few bucks!

  12. #12
    Squalor
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    Do both of your bikes have seat-clamps, or are the binders welded/brazed to the bike? If they are welded on, I would worry about the constant stress of tightening the binders down (since you will always be removing and replacing your seat and post).

    I say that because I have had one snap off under regular use.

    Sounds like a fun project though.

    LP

  13. #13
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    Just one thing to keep in mind....

    what level of maintenance do you intend to do? And, will you be working on just your bikes or other peoples bikes as well? This will determine what you need for tools. If you want to do be able to do anything and everything then the Park Tool Master Mechanic set is something to look at. But it's HUGELY expensive, but there won't be anything short of actually welding up a frame from raw tubbing that you won't be able to do. Or if you just want to work on your own stuff then getting the tools you need just for your bike(s) is certainly more ecconomical. And you can save money by buying non-bike specific tools from other sources like Sears etc. They'll be cheaper but still of good quality.

    As for flooring, stay away from the stuff you see in the gym! It is NOT oil or grease resistant and not easily cleanable! I would suggest that an epoxy type garage floor system be used for the entire floor, and then an individual mechanics rubber mat be used in front of the main work bench and be large enough to accomodate setting the wrokstand on it and still have enough coverage so you can move around the bike without stepping off the mat. This will make the floor easily cleanable, resistant to grease, oil, etc, and the mat will cushion your feet and provide traction even if you spill a little oil or whatever.

    Everyone else has given a pretty good account of the basics. But there are a couple of essential items missing. You'll need a good shop broom, a mop and bucket, and some good detergent for cleaning the floors, and a shop vac (5 gallon or bigger) wouldn't hurt either. I'd also suggest a good soft jaw bench vice. A couple of other items that may come in handy (depending on how advanced you want to get) are a small bench grinder, and a Dremel Tool. Oh and you also need an old sofa or some such, a small fridge (for cold beer or soda, your prference), and at least a cd player for just hangin' out too!

    Just some stuff to think about. But you do want your work area to be comfortable, easy to clean and keep stain free. Your call on most of it, but it should be a fun place to be.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

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